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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

wl -j; jw . THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. mi on in the frivoltios of the day, but that ho enjoys those memory-waking scenes was evidenced by the shining, red, leathery face, and furtive gleams of his oyos, as well as by his occasional bluff at a war-whoop. A hush, and then simultaneously each leader sounded his respective war cry. Then came tho fireworks. It was a very cataclysm of white ponies, with green tails, black ponies with yellow stripes, and pink manes, polka-dotted and checked ponies, and ponies, .in fact of all colors. Some had tails plaited with gaudy ribbons, withes and willow branches. Others had buffalo horns attached to the sides of their heads, and scalps and coyote tails streaming from bit and girths, while their wild riders, with lance and shield, faces and naked bodies, bedaubed with flaming serpents and horse tails, with cracking rifles and twanging b6ws all gave vent to the fiercest and most blood-curdling yelps and whoops that over rent a sum mer air. In a flash all wo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

mmmmsamtiSStSSiSm H THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. For it is a law of Divine justice that satisfaction must be given for every sin; and though the eternal punishment of Hell, due to mortal sin, is forgiven when the guilt of the sin is forgiven, yet even then there still remains the debt due to Divine justice. The debt, if not paid in this world by penance, must be paid in the world to come before the soul is fit to enter into the complete possession of its reward. Of this debt due to the Divine jus tice we have many examples in Holy Scripture. When the Israelites mur mured against the Lord, and Moses, after much prayer, obtained their par don; nevertheless God would not allow any of those that had sinned to enter into the promised land; and the same punishment, a most severe one, was inflicted upon Moses and Aaron for their want of faith when they brought forth water from the rock, though doubtless the guilt of their sin was repented of and forgiven. Again, when David had sinned against Urias...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 193 might be with God; St. Paul, St. The resa, and many others have had that ardent desire, "to be dissolved and be with Christ;" but their craving after Him was very different from that of the souls in purgatory. The saints had a 3ort of partial satisfaction of their de sire, a foretaste of heaven in the presence of God within them, but to the poor suffering souls He is not thus present. With all this thirst for God, this craving after the Infinite Beauty, they are banished from Him for how long they know not and this by their own fault and for their own unworthi ness. Thus the loss of God is a terrible pain to those poor souls. This pain is rendered still more severe by the ago nizing grief caused by the remembrance of the good opportunities they have lost, the graces they have neglected, and higher degrees of glory which they have lost when they might so easily have gained them.- All this causes great sorrow to the suffering souls, and in the opinion of most ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

12k TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. sins,"11 and from the very earliest times it had been the custom for devout Christians to seek relief for " the dead who have died in the Lord." Tertul lian, who died in 220, tells us that it was the custom in the Church that the Holy Sacrifice should be offered for the dead on their anniversary; and he men tions among the duties of a good widow that of praying for her husband's soul and causing the Holy Sacrifice to be offered for him on the anniversaries of his death. The practice of prayer for the dead is witnessed to by St. Cy prian, St. Cyril of Jerusalem, St. Am brose, St. Jerome, St. Agustine and a host of other holy Fathers: and, on the other hand, Aerius is reckoned by St. Epiphanius ft amongst heretics be cause he taught that " one should neither pray nor offer sacrifice for the dead." Our English forefathers were earnest believers in purgatoi', as is witnessed to by the many chantry chapels which they founded, and by other foundations and charitab...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

pwp "jnrrwwy -yn The Indian Advocate. 'i t -' -. Devoted to the Interests of Indian Missions. Vol. IX. JANUARY, 1897. .Mary's Christmas Vigil.6 fitted wiwk lUmjDfUimMM mmMKL Sleep, dear Babe, Thy Mother watches, Harm comes not to Thee. Would that I could rest so calmly I as safe would be. Only God's sweet will could then Sorrow bring through deeds of men. She will bear Thee far when Herod Seeks to slaugther Thee; And, when lost, will guide Thy footsteps Back to Gallilee. Oh ! teach us, sweet Babe Divine, Loving trust in her, like Thine ! Only when the time is ripened Unto God's decree, Mary stands aside and watches No more shielding Thee. But this hour is years away, Sleep in her fond care to-day ! Sleep, dear Babe, this happy morning, Mary watches Thee ! Heavenly choirs and lowly shepherds Sing adoringly, And our hearts proclaim with them Thy dear birth in Bethlehem. By Margaret E. Jordan. No. i. mftr wtitukkmn 1 dm

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

f7Wf,f SpW $ 'v " ' " ' THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. H ' The Mysterious Sick-Call of a Missionary Priest in Newfoundland. v CHAPTER I. Christmas eve, and the snow falling fast; but cozy warmth in the library of Acton Hall, where, gazing thoughtfully into the glowing coals, sat a young man in the dress of a divinity student. He started, and rose respectfully to his feet as the door opened and a white haired priest entered, his coat sprinkled with snow, and his aged form bowed with fatigue. "Did you think I was never coming, my boy ? Thank God, there were many at confession to-night, and I could not leave the church earlier." "The time has not seemed long to me, Father. I have had much to think of. If I live, where shall I be next Christmas?" and he glanced at the crimson sash he wore, marking him as set apart for missionary work. "As long as you are working, aye ! or suffering for our dear Lord, Cyril, it does not much matter not that I shall not be glad to have your strong young arm to lean...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. the warmest. Wo had said night prayers in the tiny oratory, at which the solitary domestic, a nice old Irish woman, Bridget McCarthy, had assist ed, and now my friend only lingered to see that I had all I wanted, and fancied with a half desire to say something particular, but at last he contented himself with reminding me that my room was over the kitchen, and that therefore I must not be surprised if I heard knocking for a 'sick call' during the night, and with an earnest, 'God bless you,' he left me to repose. "I watched the slow dying of the em bers of the fire kindled in honor of my 'first night,' and fell asleep about 11 o'clock. Always a light sleeper, I was sure to be specially so in a new place ; but it seemed a very short time before I started up quite awake with the impres sion of hearing some noise out3ide. I listened and distinctly heard a knocking at the kitchen door just below me. I lay back with the ejaculation: 'A sick call; poor Cyril! what a ni...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

h" THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. mons, and long confidential talks. It seemed to me that Cyril had attained to heights of holiness in the short time we had been separated, that placed him far above me, but ho tried in his humility to place himself beneath mo, and to de fer to my judgment and opinion. The only thing that grieved me was the ex tremely delicate state of his health; his cough was frequent, and I heard of ter rible night perspirations from Bridget. CHAPTEIl III. "On the morning of Christmas eve, as we were sitting at breakfast, a boy on a rough pony rode upto the door and demanded to see Father Northcote. Cy ril went out, brought him in to the fire, and gave him a cup of coffee and a hunch of bread and butter. He was a bright-faced sailor lad, and said he had come to fetch 'the Father to see Mrs. Donovan at West Cove.' " 'But I thought Mrs. Donovan was a Protestant; I'm sure she told me so,' remarked Cyril. " 'Yes, Father, and a werry black-un, I've always heard, but she's took b...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

mmmmmmmm i fHft tttblAN ADVOCATE. i" ' help hoping sho may send for me at the last and that might be to-night,' ho added eagerly, 'and perhaps ,' ho paused, and I added, 'God might accept the sacrifice and pardon the guilty.' CHAPTER IV. "1 did not know then how entire a sacrifice would be required. Cyril's cough was incessant that evening, but he would go to the confessional and was detained there till 10 o'clock. Then he acknowledged himself worn out, and let me put him to bed and give him a warm drink. I left him asleep, breathing more quietly and with a brow relaxed and peaceful as a child's. I too was soon asleep, but was aroused, while it was still quite dark, by a knocking at the kitchen door. At first I shuddered and said a prayer, dreading to hear the. tinkle of the mysterious sledge bells, but soon recognized the sound as very human knocking and the shouts as being for ' Father Northcote.' I threw on my dressing-gown and met Cyril on the landing. We went down together, and...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

"'-,aHr 6 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. to the funeral and slept in the house the night before it, but neither they nor any others ever again heard the ghostly sick-call, and wo may truly hope that the faithfulness of the one priest, even unto death, had atoned for the weakness of the other. "And now, my boy, you know another reason why I persuaded your mother to call you Cyril, and rejoiced when you told me you desired to be a missionary." " God grant I may follow the exam ple set before me," said the young student earnestly. "Hark!" said the old man, rising and resuming his cloak, ' the chimes are beginning for the midnight Mass," and taking his pupil's arm they went together through the snow to kneel in the convent chapel, and thank God for His great gift, the origin and source of all faith and self-devotion. 11. M. Luahiugton, in St. Andrew s Magazine. NEWSPAPER EDUCATION. It would be hard to find a young' American who does not read a news paper regularly; it would be easy to point out t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

"""VPWJjT' r-jr T ' THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. dom. IIg would answer these asser tions, how? His catechism does not help him. His parents would bo horri fied by his doubts, or simply answer: "Believe." The American spirit is a questioning spirit. "Why" is perpe tually on its lips. He knows the letter of his faith, nothing' more. Ten minutes in the confessional at long intervals, a hasty question or two, answered with "Be lieve," do not satisfy him. He has read much on eternal punish Nment in the newspapers. His favorite sheet has declared it to be unreasonable. A scientist (God save the mark) has gravely stated his disbelief in the resur rection of the body because goats have been seen to eat grass that grew on dead men's graves I Our young man begins to accept the teaching of the Church with "scientific" reservation. Ho does not read a Catholic journal; he has no time to read a Catholic book. Both, journals and books, are too "preachy", too long-winded;, besides, Catholic wri ters are al...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

-r wr wnHV , 7"T3JE " MHIMinWIW'nH1 "ll"WW'WmiN MiT'inr mnTTiW iiiiiniiiii r ,ZTi ffPW -?-7 j- THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. They merit their misfortunes who do not know how to turn them to advantage. Xtc Indian tdVocatc Ib a Quarterly Review, published by the Benedictine Fathers of the Indian Tor., to plead tho cause of the last remnants of Indian tribes, and to give a history of their progress toward civilization. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of each tribe ; their progress in education and religion ; their occupa tions, industries, schools, etc., etc. Also, a history of our mis sions, statistics, and other interesting matter that can not be found in any other publication. Tho proceeds of this Review will be used for educating and converting the Indians of the Territory. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, Sacred Heart P. 0 , Okla. Ter. Approved by Right Rev. THEO. MEERSCHAERT, Vicar Apostolic of Oklahoma and Indian Territory. A Quarterly Roviow, entered at tho Sacrod Heart Post O...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

1 '"JwiMryw''' "t"vv"V"ff--" fFj3-""- r-y THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 9 It is sometimes very painful to do one's duty, but never so painful as not to have done it. Before marriage was her treasure; became dearer and The Fiji Islands in Polynesia, in a population of 150,000, have 10,000 Catholics, attended by seven Marist Fathers. Two great local events occurred since our last issue. The first in order of time is the solemn blessing of Abbot elect D Thomas Duperon, O.S.B., by Bishop Meerschaert, D.D., on Novem ber 11. The second is the sacerdotal silver jubilee of our venerated Bishop, November 22. , The reception tendered to the Right Rev. Jubilarian at Guthrie, to com memorate the twenty-fifth anniversary of his Lordship's ordination, was a she was dear and he but afterwards she he treasurer. magnificent tribute of the love in which he is hold by the people. The Most Rev. Archbishop Janssens, of Now Or leans; Rt. Rev. Fitzgerald, of Little Rock, Ark.; Rt. Rev. Dunn, of Dallas, Tex., and R...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

' Vfapw"Tif -" f T '10 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. In the government Indian schools last year 16,584 children were enrolled arid the average attendance was 12,804. In the contract schools the enrollment was 5,880 and the average attendance 4,998. In puhlic day schools there are 319, and in mission schools not assist ed by Government there were 253. Altogether there were 23,036 pupils receiving education. This is only sixty per cent of the children of school age. So that while there is no accommodation in either public or de nominational schools for forty per cent of the children, the enemies of the re ligious schools are clamoring for their destruction! The Indians of Kerain Lake, British Columbia, have set aside 200 marten skins to pay for their new church. At Halowt, the Lower Shushwap camp, the Indians have agreed to sell in Kamloops for the "benefit of their church 200 cords of firewood. At the Upper Shushwap camp, the young chief, Francois Shilpahan, has employ ed his men cutting down...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

HtfT TOjryaj JOT J" ' " THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 11 who moved so earnestly in their ranks. Peace hath her victories, no loss re nowned than war, and the Bishop had the proud consciousness of having achieved a bloodless conquest among the Indians of the far West. All our happiness depends upon our detachment from ourselves; and in this, if it bo perfect, consists every thing. St. Teresa. Some time ago Mgr. Meerschaert, Vicar Apostolic of the Indian Territory, dedicated a Catholic church near Grove, Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory. This church was mostly built by a devout Catholic, named Mathias Spit log, the wealthiest Indian in the terri tory. The building is of stone and very substantial. Once upon a time, there was a rose bush in a garden, and on its topmost branch a full-blown rose was growing. A close observer, however, could see that its leaves had none of the fresh ness, none of the softness and fra grance that make this flower such a favorite. Down below it, on the same branch,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

' 7 12 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. innirnrt i "f At the beginning of a now year it is well to stop in our career and calmly review the past. We can easily recall not only the many mistakes we have made, but also the opportunities we have missed. We can learn wherein we have erred, and what were the oc cassions and causes of our errors. To all of us the past has many useful les sons to teach, if we will only take time to consider the subject in its true meaning, and resolve to rectify the faults of the past by making noble resolutions for the future, and by en deavoring to keep them. The past year has brought prosperity and happi ness to many, while on the other hand it has brought affliction, sadness and suffering to others. But whether it ha'S brought us prosperity or affliction, we should thank our Lord for sending us what He thinks proper for us, and bow in submission to his Holy will. We are all one year nearer to our graves, and therefore should be prepar ing to give an account of our...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

-v,w,wp, -JKNKfrvf''jn''fisvy r "vyi THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 13 Religion gives a moaning to life. It provides fortitude to endure trouble, humility to stand prosperity, hope for death, light for the grave and the ex pectation of a joyful immortality. The fifteenth centenary of the death of St. Ambrose, the great doctor, whose learning and sanctity have illumined the church of Milan, Italy, will be celebrated this year. He died in 397. . December 8, Brothers Stanilas and Aloysius took the three simple vows of poverty, chastity and obedience; and Brother Thomas vowed the same for three years. May they live long enough to make their solemn profession and may they then persevere till the end. St. Bede's Literary Society. In the July issue the Advocate ad vertised to its readers the existence of a society born under the same roof as he. We thought wo would afford some pleasure to our readers if we would tell them something about what has been baptized as "St. Bede's Literary So ciety." Well...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

m I I ! . ljlin. MIIJIlU.I ' ' . ' H"J 14 THIi INDIAN ADVOCATE. regions of Hell, and the sweet balmj' breezes of Paradise. The narrow defiles of Philosophy are being occupied also; and certain sen tinels are brandishing their two-edged sword of "Logic," ready to lopp off the auricular appendage of such bipeds as belong to the Ingersollian family. Sorry to say, some materials have so far proved wanting to our young athletes in the manufacture of their "weapons. In their need they confi dently turn to the oft-experienced generosity of our subscribers. At this season, when at the pitch of .Christian gladness, the Catholic heart is so prone to lavish money in trivialities, our lady readers would do well to obey a no less Christian instinct, and sacrifice for the interest of the little Jesus, the dime or the quarter destined to procure them a fashionable pin or a shining button. The good Catholic gentlemen would on their part perform a no less manly act in depositing at the feet of the I...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

rrr ly.'yy rr j,-. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 15 llT Reminiscences of November II, '96. Having, in company with friends from Denison, visited Sacred Heart Mission, Oklahoma Territory, on the late occasion of the installation of the Rev. T. Duperon, as Abbot, I present the Advocate with the following in re lation to that interesting event: Our party, consisting of the Rt. Rev. Bishop Dunne, Rev. T. K. Crowley, J. D. Quinn, J. F. Cuff and others, made the trip by rail to Shawnee, a town eighty miles west of McAlister, on the Choctaw, Oklahoma and Gulf Railroad, and thence by private conveyance thir ty miles southeast to our destination. The road from Shawnee to the Mission is merely a track cut through the woods and the country being very hilly, it is by no means easily traveled. The weather being favorable, however, and our driver an expert, this part of the journey was accomplished in six hours. Owing to the dense woods and the broken character of the country, scarce ly a glimpse of the M...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Ff . w If entertainment. Princely arrangements were made for the entertainment of visitors, comparing favorably with those of the best hotels. Nothing, in fact, was left undone to render the occasion enjoyable to the greatest possible ex tent. N. S. STAR OF BETHLEHEM. Shine brightly, Star of Bethlehem, Our earth illume with light! Let awe subdue ye, mighty winds, Thy Lord is born to-night. Proud Herod, bend thy kingly knee, Let trembling seize thy heait; For in the kingdom of this Babe Thy soul shall have no part Oh, little hand so email and frail, "Within thy palm there lies Creation, and those fingers bind Our earth unto the skies. Then shine, thou fairest star of heaven, Make bright the wise men's way, That all the world through them may know The joys of Christmas day ! St. Mary's Chimes Written for the Advocate. The History of Indian Tribes in the Twin Territories. II. Tin: Creek Nation. At the time of its discovery by De Soto (1540) this tribe of Indians wa...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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