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Title: Cayton's Weekly Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 713 items from Cayton's Weekly, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 5 July 1919

THE NEGRO ENTERS LABOR UNION Not since the abolition of chattel slavery, says the New York Age, a leading Afro- American weekly, has any step been taken toward the industrial freedom of the race so important as that of the American Fed eration of Labor when it voted to open its doors unconditionally to the Negro. This means, as the New York Times points out, that "all over the country the Negro worker will have, as he has not had hitherto, a chance to enter all of the skilled, and there fore better paid trades, and in them to be judged on his merits." It wipes out "the part of the color-line which most impeded the progress of the black race," says the New York World, which reminds us that colored wage-earners now constitute about one-seventh of our industrial population. The New York Tribune interprets this vic tory for the Negro as "a by-product of the war." One of the colored delegates to the Fed eration of Labor convention in Atlantic City, pleading for the resolution which was a...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 5 July 1919

not accept Jesus Christ as the long expected king because He preached of a heavenly kingdom instead of a worldly kingdom and now the idea of Christ bein«r of black blood is advanced, owing to a jealousy existing between white and black fanatics, each trying to place Him upon their color prejudiced pedestal and claim Him as theirs and not the world's which very dogma Jesus Christ abused when on earth. It is of little or no consequence through what particular class of human beings Jesus Christ reached the world, since He came to save the world and did it, It is the duty of the black man, the white man and all manner of man to act well his part in the present world drama and there all the honor lies. In this country, however, men like Mr. Webb, with hobbies that have for their object the black man overshadowing the white man in the past, which forms the basis for a hope that lie will again do so, will for the next cen tury be a drawing card for lecturers, which will be taken adanta«re ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 5 July 1919

DID YOU KNOW? \'<>i the least of the pood things coming out of the present upsetting of world rela tions will be the changed conditions of liouse servants. The uirls and women who went into munition factories and other war work are disinclined to return to the kitchen. In Prance, in England, as well as in the United States the servant problem has become acute through lack of supply. Eligher wages, even to doubling or to trebling, have had little effect, nor does the multiplication of servant privileges. In deed, it is the very fact of being a servant that is creating all the trouble. The spirit of democracy has been taken seriously. Good wages they want and better hours and treatment generally. Hut first of all they want to he men and women. If any ser vant less msitress wishes to know just what this means, let her imagine herself working in another woman's kitchen. Such a thought may seem fantastic to her. Pos sibly it is when she thinks of the somewhat undeveloped maids she ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 12 July 1919

J&uf£ch& iMeeAfa PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle. Washington. U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE OAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South THE PASSING THRONG. PRESIDENT WILSON RETURNS Last Tuesday, after an absence of six months in Europe trying to make the world safe for democracy of the brand manufac tured in the United States, where 4,000 colored men, women and children have been swung 1 to lynchers limbs and burned at the stake, mostly in the South, which sec tion made it possible for Woodrow Wilson to be a factor in the world peac...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 12 July 1919

dose to 100,000, a co-operative meat market and grocery, a banking loan association and finally a Listman Service Company that has for its object the fostering of small indus tries among the members of organized labor, lie who wrote, '.Just experience in every soil shows those who think will govern who toil," would be surprised could he return to .Mother Karth and see those who toil tak ing an active part in governing those who toil, all of which leads us to compare organized labor in Seattle to a fellow want ing to go to bed. He was told by the inn keeper that he would have to sleep with another man. who had already retired. The sleepy man went to the room and after undressing started to get into bed, but just then the man in bed had an awful tit and those fits would come back every time the out of bed man started to get in bed. The latter, finally suspecting the cause, waited for another tit to begin, when he seized a convenient pisselm club and lit into the titty man with might a...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 12 July 1919

PEBBLES. A girl, at least, may smile and smile and be a-willin'.—Yale Record. We gather from the newspaper that shooting for the new Mexican presidency has commenced.—Punch. She—Did you know that Maude has a dark room on purpose for proposals? He—Well, rather. 1 developed a nega tive there myself last night.—Blighty. "What kind of a woman is his wife, Amanda ?'' "I think she is what you call a man datory. '' —Baltimore American. He —I notice that women don't wear ear rings in their ears so often nowadays. She —No; but they still have them bored. —London Opinion. The little pig was weeping, For his father had been slain; But a porcupine, consoilng said, "Oh, porcupine in vain." —Harvard Lampoon. "You say your laundry woman reminds you of a good preacher?" "Yes; she's always bringing things home to me that I never saw before." —Boston Transcript. "lias your wife a sense of humor?" "1 don't think so," relied Mr. Pynhed. "I have told her the same joke over and over and I don't believe s...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 12 July 1919

ST R I K BS A NI ) T II KIK EFFECT. The conditions in the labor world here and in oilier countries are giving tlioughful people great concern. Not only many large industries are paralyzed by the striking workers, but, in large cities like Chicago, si likes are ordered in departments the clos ing down of which endangers the health of every citizen, -hist at present the street and alley cleaners, re-enforced by other essential departmental employes, are on a strike for higher wages, and the budget for the year will have to be materially increased to meet the demands. The money must come from somewhere and that somewhere is the tax payer's pocket. With the cost of living steadily advancing the wage earner has a perfect right to de mand more for his labor, but his demands should be reasonable and not enforced by violence. Strikers always command the syni paihy of the masses until by some overt act they lose it. In the past it was at this point we stepped in and rescued the em ployes fro...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 26 July 1919

J@agftch& Jzee£^( PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. ELEFHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South ANTI-NEGRO RIOTS As long as the white citizens of this country permit their prejudices against the colored citizens to assume a state of intoler ance, which grows and grows until it be " comes acute, there will be outbreaks be tween the two classes —race riots, if you please—of the kind that occurred in Wash ington. D. C, one day this week. From time to time, and more especially in the South and the nea...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 26 July 1919

;i state of evolution we each time jret nearer to Him, who directs the whole. If the multiplied millions of planets and other bodies that fly through space by fixed rules are not peopled, then of what use and pur pose pan they bet Whether man evoluted from a mouse, a mole or a magot or whether he was always n superior creature is no nearer a solution now than in the past, but we are a believer of the hitter and yet when questions in sup port of the former are put to us they are unanswerable. "When you were a fro? and I fi fish" may to the majority of us sound foolish, yen. assiniine, but hundreds and thousands of persons with brijrht minds believe that such ;i state of mind and body did exist, which by evolution through the ages has brought them to the present state. Who knows but what in some world beyond this to which the in habitants of this will be sent after death that the state of mind and body are as far superior to the state of mind and body in this world and age as are ours...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 26 July 1919

is not the scholar that is Dußois, nor the logician that is Kelly Miller, and not the dramatist that is James Weldon Johnson, nor is he the organizer that was Booker T. Washington, but he is a lecturer with whose talk you never grow tired. OUR MILITARY TRAGEDIES When a court-martial of the United States army tried, convicted and ordered hung a number of colored soldiers at Fort San Houston before the president of the Fnited States had time to stay the proceed ings, the colored citizens all over this country and probably a majority of the white citizens denounced the proceedings as drastic, yea. even brutal, and especially under the circumstances, but militarism was the autocrat of the land and the un fortunates being black men the matter was hushed up. However, embolden by that piece of barbaric brutality, the autocrat went from bad to worse until he made the shades of Nero hang 1 his head in shame. Now comes Senator Chamberlain, a Demo crat of Oregon, who has started an investi gat...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 26 July 1919

MORE OR LESS INTERESTING The National Association for the Ad rancemeni of Colored People has issued a pamphlei called "Burning at Stake in the Tinted States." in which it gives H record of the public burning by mobs of five men during the first five months of 1910 in the States of Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Mis sissippi and Texas. William Trotter of Boston, representing the National Equal Rights League, on the sth sent to Sir Eric Drummond, secretary ueiieral of the League of Nations, a lons petition asking that certain clauses be in serted in the League of Nations Covenant. These clauses, the petition said, were de signed to secure for American Negroes and other racial minorities "full democracy." A campaign of education with the view to bringing about public opposition to lynching is announced by the Southern Publicity Committee of the Southern Sociological Congress. The program of the [•ampnign provides Por the sending of speakers to conventions actively to enlist religious, edu...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 2 August 1919

- — --•• • " i ", non . PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U- ►>. .A. In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOR CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South THE PASSING THRONG RACE RIOTS CONTINUE Let no one feel unduly alarmed over the more or less bloody race riots in Washing ton City and Chicago of recent date for they and others that will periodically follow, there and other places, are but the fore runners of the adjustment of long standing differences between man and man — white and colored. All such riots, as bad as they are, will produce a be...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 2 August 1919

"That there is any direct connection be tween the Japanese 'racial equality' cam paign and the clashes in American cities is so improbable it may be dismissed without further consideration. No evidence lias been unearthed tending to prove the existence in this country of Nipponese propaganda to excite unrest. "By making the question an international issue, however. Nippon has dignified it to .hi extent and the clashes in the United Stales may he an indirect result of the situation thus created. "The 2,000 Negroes who clamorously ap proved 'radicalism' on the part of members of the race as a 'means of obtaining their rights,' in the course of a meeting held yesterday at New York, were tinkering with edged tools. They could not have appreciated the gravity of their utterances or the danger of the policy they noisily ap proved. "The Chicago race riots, following on after those in Washington, probably will not l>c permitted to pursue the same course. The capital policy were slow to a...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 2 August 1919

POLITICAL POT PIE "I am against Miles Poindexter for president," said a prominent Seattle Re publican, "and that, too, if I am the only person in the state that is against him." That's a political blunder, Mr. Prominent Republican, and should you ever come up for an office again that stand will cost you some votes. Climb into the band wagon and make it unanimous for Senator Poin dexter and you will lose nothing by it in the long run, even if he should not be nom inated. The concensus of opinion is the voters of Washington are as ignorant now as to where Senator Jones stands on the treaty as they were prior to making his speech before the Young Men's Republican Club. The more those who heard the speech think about it. the less pleased they are with it. No one save those who favor the treaty seem to approve of the speech. The Democrats have already began to bestir themselves to give President Wilson a pleasant reception, so far as they are con cerned, when he visits Seattle, but it is...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 2 August 1919

court in the hearing of the suit of Mrs. Dwyer's husband, Francis I*. Dwyer (white) tn have their marriage annulled on the ground that "Negro blood Sows in her veins." The trial is in its second week. Judge Troii]) said after the arguments from both sides had been heard that he would render his decision the latter part of this week. The courtroom was crowded during the Pew days the trial lias been heard, and Mr. McCarry, a man of very swarthy com plexion, the front half of his head bald .Hid the back half covered with straight .uray hair, was the center of attraction. He denied that there is any "colored blood" in his veins, and testified to his ancestry as follows: "Father, a politician in Mississippi, post master of the city of Natchez for four years nnd sheriff of the county for ten years and ,i slave holder. Mother, a white woman, living now in Washington, 1). C, 1523 Columbia street. Mother's mother, a school ma'am in Massachusetts, who went south In tench school. Father's fath...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 9 August 1919

J@agfZcfi&JzeeAfa PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South THE PASSING THRONG The editor hereof is unalterably opposed to Negro segregation either in church, in political or municipal affairs, and when ever it is done the final settlement of the alleged race problem in this country will be retarded just that much and for a cer tain length of time. But a few weeks ago, on the contrary, however, we published an article herein telling how well a colored community...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 9 August 1919

J&uf£ch& iMeje^fa PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTONS WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal Justine to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South THE PASSING THRONG The editor hereof is unalterably opposed to Negro segregation either in church, in political or municipal affairs, and when ever it is done the final settlement of the alleged race problem in this country will be retarded just that much and for a cer tain length of time. But a few weeks ago, on the contrary, however, we published an article herein telling how well a colored commun...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 9 August 1919

'! mi Callaghan showed his l>i«j: heartedness by permitting all the load to fall on him. In spite of his misfortunes, .Jim Callaghan !•> one of (iod 's noblemen. Hundreds of colored and white' people fame together Wist Monday at Cle Ehim, Washington, for an annual celebration, which was commemorative of the Act of Parliament emancipating the black slaves nf thf West Indies in 1837, which eventu ally brought about the emancipation of the black folks held as slaves throughout the world. Probably a great majority of those present knew little or nothing of the under lying cause for that celebration, but the l>ii! Peed of barbecued beef was promised, and that was their cause of coming. After having boon called to order by James E. Shepperson, the moving spirit of the occa sion, a splendid paper apropos to the call of the gatherings was read by Miss Wil liams and this was followed by an address by the lion. E. K. Brown of Ellensburg, which was full and overflowing with pride, pat...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 9 August 1919

"OUR OWN SUBJECT RACE" REBELS There is ;i touch of irony, a good many observers find, in the chance that brought a race-riot to President Wilson's door in Washington so soon after he had returned from looking after the needs of supprest nationalities and subject races in Europe. "One of the most brutal forms of oppres sion," asserts the New York World in an editorial entitled "Our Own Subject Race," "is the punishment of a -whole race for the crimes of individuals. For many years this has been, and still is, the practise in Amer ican States that do not recognize the citi zenship of the Negro." In the Washington riots, for the first time on any considerable scale, the Negroes met ""mobs with mobs," and inflicted at least as many casualties as were inflicted on them. This rebellion against injustice was "bound to come/ ac cording to The World, which concludes: "We grieve over the hardships of many subject peoples a long way off, and on occasion manifest something resembling in dignati...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 9 August 1919

"MAKE AMERICA SAFE FOB DEMOCRACY" «.lini Jam Jems.) As h slogan the title <>t" this Hrticle suits us. We are Rweary and we don't mind saying so. of «i flock of phraseological rain bows which lead nowhere. "Making the world iisic j «>r democracy:" "self deter initiation of Kitialler nations:*' **open co\l'luinis of pence openly arrived at;" "men of vision:" "new spirit and methods" ;iikl "the same great family of ihc world." .-ill glittered alluringly until they were sunk in the slimy depths of in trigue, chicanery and diplomatic grab and jrnifi nt the so-called Peace Conference. "Pis sweet to he remembered." and the gratitude of our European brethren posi tively Moods our tear ducts. Take ;i look ;il it. Kussi;i after carelessly annexing a few hundred millions of American money mns s;icres American soldiers sent there to pre vent German lootage of war supplies. Rut their lint red of America hasn't yet resulted in repaying the hundreds of millions out of which they nipped us...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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