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Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857) Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 3,401 items from Boston Pilot (1838-1857), samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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TO THE BLESSED VIRGIN. (OUR MOTHER.) [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 March 1846

TO THE BLESSED VIRGIN. (OUR MOTHER.) Mary Mother on whose breast Smil’d the infant God of Love, Whose seraphic lip carest Hon who sways the whole above; Still a feeling Mother be, Virgin Mary, pray for me. Tiiou who stood’st beneath the wood, Where thy Saviour Son was hung, Drench’d and crimson’d by the flood, Which upon tne brow he flung; Let that day appeal to thee— Virgin Marv, pray for me. Shaking off the fearful gloom, Bursting forth on glory’s wing, W hen He left the shroud and tomb, Glorified and triumphing; By a Mother’s jubilee, Virgin Mary, pray for me. By thy virgin purity, By thine infant's lond caress, Bv the pangs of Calvary, By thy present blessedness, Still, oh still a Mother he, Virgin Mary, pray for me.

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE DOGS OF ST. BERNARD. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 March 1846

THE DOGS OF ST. BERNARD. The convent of the Great St. Bernard is situated near the top of the mountain known by that name, near one of the most dangerous passages of the Alps, between Switzerland and Savoy. In these regions the traveller is often overtaken by the most severe weather, even after days of cloudless beauty, when the glaciers glitter in the sunshine, and the pink flowers of the rhododendron appear as if they were never to be sullied by the tempest. But a storm suddenly comes on; the roaas are rendered impassible by drifts of snow; the avalauches, which are huge loosened masses of snow or ice, are swept into the valleys, carrying trees and crags of rocks before them. The hospitable monks, though their revenue is scanty, open their doors to every stranger that presents himself. To be cold, to be weary, to be benighted constitute the title to their comfortable shelter, their cheering meal, and their agreeable converse. But their attention to the distressed does not end here...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
IRELAND. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 March 1846

IRELAND. What a magnificent country is this—scenery of infinite variety and beauty, and land and rivers teeming with abundance ! \\ here shall we find opportunities supplied by Nature of greater national blessings and happiness! yet, after all, what horrible mischiefs have the passions of man and bad legislation worked for it! And where are we to find hope, as long as England persists in forcing institutions on the country alien to the habits of the people, and, therefore, the certain cause of endless dissatisfaction ! Tnke the Church, for instance established by law: it is hated by ninetenths of the people, and has beeu so ever since its establishment; yet is still upheld in all its uselessness, and ostentatious and offensive pride! With the greater part of the landlords living out of Ireland, the representatives and preservers of social order must needs be the Clergy, as standing between the high orders and numerous and excitable poor. But the Protestant Clergy cannot be conservat...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
A VISIT TO DERRYNANE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 March 1846

A VISIT TO DERRYNANE. The way grew ever more and more wild. Can Derrynane he in so wild a country as this? asked I of the driver. “Ah, faith is it, and far wilder” said he. The Counsellor’s house is all amongst the wild mountains; but he has a meadoio such as he’ll hardly see anywhere else.” On turning the brow of the hill there lay a descending country at the foot of the mountains, of some two miles in extent there spread out the broad Atlantic to the left; and there, on its margin, amidst its mass of embosoming wood, stood forth the gray pile of Darrynane. As 1 approached the house, rain came on—and the w ild misty clouds gave a still more impressive aspect to the scene—while the white spray of the ocean was seen flying high against the rocks, and the roar of the sea came full of majesty on the wind. I made my driver stop at a respectful distance from the house, though 1 believe, and as it may be imagined in such a country, it was not the first time that a stranger had arrived in ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
INVITATIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 March 1846

INVITATIONS. The Charitable Irish Society, would have favored us with an invitation, but their constitution expressly says, that no Irishman shall be invited as a guest, except a trancient visitor, who would in that case, be course lias been pursued since the organization of the society. The object is to induce every native of Ireland to join that venerable association. The committee, however, kindly furnished our reporter with a ticket. Jj- To the gentlemanly managers of the dinner given by the Hibernian Total Abstinence Sooiety we are iudebted for tickets to their celebration. We had to regret, from a prior engagement, that we could not attend. Th'e letter from Capt. Baxter, conveying the invitation says:— “Dear Donuhoe This is the first attempt to Introduce the Ladies to grace our Festivals I hope you will attend a part of the evening. You can, at any rale bring your lady, and if you are compceled to attend the old Irish Society we shall have the “better half” among us. Our bette...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
CELEBRATION OF ST. PATRICK’S DAY. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 March 1846

CELEBRATION OF ST. PATRICK’S DAY. In the forenoon the various Temperance Societies to the number of about two thousand, formed in order, and proceeded through the City according to the programme in our last. They made a line appearauce. The banners were splendidly illuminated and notwithstanding the rather unfavorable character of the weather the whole went off well. The Irish Charitable Society met at 12 o’clock, for the election of officers and despatch of other business. The following gentlemen were re-elected officers for the ensuing year:— Terence McHugh, President ; Patrick Sharkey, Vice-President; Arthur M’Avny, Treasurer; John H. Barry, keeper of the silver key; Edwin A. Palmer, Secretary. In the evening the Society met, to celebrate its 109th anniversary, at the Merchant’s Hotel. About a hundred gentlemen sat down to dinner ; which was served up in Gori’s best style. Among the guests were Hon. Marcus M'ortoii; flon. Wm. B. Calhoun, Speaker of the Senate of Massachusetts; Re...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE TEMPERANCE DINNER. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 March 1846

THE TEMPERANCE DINNER. The Hibernia Total Abstinence Society celebrated their second anniversary on St. Patrick’s Day, by assisting at the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, offered up by the Rev. Mr. O’Reilly, at St. Mary’s Church, at 7 o’clock, A. M., and in the afternoon, accompanied by their ladies, sat down to a snmptuous Dinner at CentraT Hall, served up by Ford, in his best manner. Several distinguished friends of the Temperance cause were present. Speeches, songs and sentiments, mirth and good humor, occupied some few hour’s time, and the Ladies were unanimous for having the party repeated, as being the happiest St. Patrick’s day they had ever known. The following are the regular sentiments:— 1. The Day —Celebrated for centuries in commemoration of the Apostle of the Prince of Peace, may centuries yet to come bear witness to the good effects of the virtue of the great St. Patrick. 2. The President of the United States —Placed at the head of the Government by the election of the peo...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
ORIGINAL. SONG. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 March 1846

ORIGINAL. SONG. CAROL MALONE. The golden furze clusters, and shines upon Slemish; The heather-bell braves the wild breeze on his head ; Far below, are green meadows, and plains with out blemish, Where primroses blossom, and daisies are spread. Springtime is coming ! oh, springtime is coming! The winds are as gentle as children at play ; The iirst gifts, and earnests of summer are bloomings The spirit that brings life and joy has been roaming; The hope ot the year comes wi,th Patrick’s Day. The Lark is up singing; the violets are springing; Good luck ever bringing, come, Patrick’s Day ! In time's hoary winter, men’s spirits were frozen; And darkness and storminess hung over head: Then spriugtime came sweetly; the Daystar arose on The sinshrouded world, and idolatry fled. 'Twas then came St. Patrick ; and verdure, and glory Bloomed where he breathed, and illumined his way. Erin! the Shepherd from Slemish looked o’er thee; And brightly, that look beameth still on thy story ; The hope o...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
SAMUEL LOVER, A NATIONALIST. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 March 1846

SAMUEL LOVER, A NATIONALIST. At a recent dinner given in Dublin to some of the reporters of the press in that city, Samuel Lover was present. On the tbast of “ the author of Rory O’Moore ” being given, Mr. Lover rose and said:— I sincerely am thankful for the compliment paid me this day in inviting me to witness a scene so proud and gratifying, and which has given me so much pleasure on my return to my native land (cheers). I see three gentleman who are about to leave this country to exercise their talents in the sister land. 1 see their4i'iends gathering round them to esteem for their talents, admiration for their straightforwardness, a consciousness that they will do their country honor—and to say “ God speed ” before they go (cheers). 1 feel the weight of this .compliment, the more because some twelve years ago 1 left my native land, and I have had an opportunity within that time of seeing that my native land was growing strong in her appreciation of her own worth (cheers). — The...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE EMPEROR OF RUSSIA AND O’CONNELL. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 March 1846

THE EMPEROR OF RUSSIA AND O’CONNELL. At a late meeting at Conciliation Hall, Dublin, Mr O’Connell, in the course of his speech, introduced some remarks on the late visit of the Emperor Nicholar to Rome, from which we take the following extract* “ It was said by the tyrant of Russia, who by-the-bye, first heard a lesson of wisdom and reproof from the aged and sainted man who is at the head of the Catholic church, and who has exhibited the noblest specimen»of religious independence—that ho had 500,000 bayonets to support him.— Thu Emperor boasted of his 500,000 bayonets, but the man without a single bayonet checked and awed him—and the miscreant monster felt that he was a man again,when he was shrinking and trembling before the frown, and when he was rebuked by the feeble accents of the father of the church. Never was there a more beautiful instance of the power of morality and religion over physical force and brutality. There was an aged gentleman, scarcely able to rise from his chai...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 March 1846
Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 March 1846

COPARTNERSHIP NOTICE. 'Ye, the undersigned, Andrew Carney, and Jacob Sleeper, of boston, in tiie County of Suffolk, anti Commonwealth of Massachusetts; ai.u Joseph j. \v liun.g, Michael Koiioe, uisi ohu.los W. laalloupt, of said boston, hereby corin'), Mat We nave lbruieuuhmileuGuparlnersliip lor Me transaction ol business in tue luunnlucture anu sale ol Clothing, to be cunuuctud under the name anu linn ol Vy.nn.Nti At KanOc.; luat tiie principal place ol business ol 4 said Copartnership is situate in Ann street, in saiu bus ton; that saiu Wlilting, Keiloe, anu Galluupe are general partners, and saiu curacy a..d bleeper ure special partners and nave contriuuteu to the common stock Me specific sum of fiiteen Mousand dollars .each b njutn in actual casli payment, as cupilal; that said partnership is to commence Me first uay ol January, lo4j, anu to terminate on tiie first uay ol January, A. D. tool. ANDREW CARNEY, jACOo SLlli.l bit JObc.ru J. Will I'ING, MICuAEL Kl.i.Oij, Jit. CiiA.Re...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 March 1846

Notices of this kind inserted four times for $l. INFORMATION WANTED, LOST!!! New York, March (5, 1845. Information is wanted of the Parents or relations of the lute JOHN COS TER, McCOSKER, or CUTTER, aPah.L r by trade,and a native of Massachusetts, who was lost on board the John Minturn, wrecked iu coming from i\e« Orleans, on Sunday the lath of February, 1&45. liy applying to Mr. Jam ns Pk vert, House Painter, Hy Pearl street, Franklin Square, New York, his family, i who ure supposed to reside in Stoughton, Norfolk County, Massachusetts, near boston), will hear of something to their advantage. N. 11. The said John Oosker, McCluskey, or Cutter did visit his Father on the 4th of July last. MhlllHt Of PATRICK McIIALE, or his Mother, who was married (second time) to a man of the name of MATTHEW DUHER, all of the parisli of Killtoine, co. Mayo. When last heard of they were in the Stale of Maine. Should this meet their eye, or any person that eves knew them, they would center...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
PROSPECTS OF REPEAL. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 March 1846

PROSPECTS OF REPEAL. Mr. O’Connell recently delivered the following remarks on the prospects of Repeal. What are our prospects? I will tell you —wc have added two hundred thousand to our numbers within the last year (hear, and cheers). Amongst this number were several Orangemen, although compared with the large numbers of the Orangemen of.the north, we have not even gained what would be called a small minority, yet, every Orangeman is a source of strength,as scattering in circles hitherto shut out from the struggle, the seeds of nationality (cheers). And why should they not join us? They are Irishmen as well as we are—the struggle in which we are engaged will result in their benefit as well as in ours, ami I would ask what good is it to them that their landlords are spending their rents in other countries (hear)? Are not their landlords opposed to the tenantright? And while I am endeavoring to bring it into the south, are not the Orange landlords working to uproot it in the north (c...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
FHILADELPHIA REPEAL ASSOCIATION. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 March 1846

FHILADELPHIA REPEAL ASSOCIATION. The Association held a large and enthusiastic meeting in the Chinese Saloon, on Wednesday Evening, March 4th, Robt. Tyler, Esq., President, in the Chair. The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted. The meeting then proceeded with the election of new members and receiving subscriptions, when Mr. Miles, D. Sweeney handed in the names of the following persons, with their subscriptions for 1846 : Capt. Joseph Diamond, J. Maguire. (Callow hill street,) Samuel Hood, Esq., Messrs. James Faye, Alexander Diamond, Dr. Kilduff Dennis Sullivan, Patrick Muiray; James M’Cann, Dennis Mealy and James Kelsh, each paid five dolars. Capt. John Killion, 82; Lieut. M’Donough, 82 50; Mrs. Miles D. Sweeney, Hugh F. Sweeney, Miss Mary Ann Sweeney, Catherine Sweeney, Eiin T. Sweeney, (family of Mr. Miles D. Sweeney,) paid 85. The following gentlemen were then elected : Messrs. Michael Monahan, Jofin O'Donnell, Francis Timmins, Win. Smith, Patrick Conroy, Michael S...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Correspondence MOONEY’S HISTORY OF IRELAND. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 March 1846

Correspondence MOONEY’S HISTORY OF IRELAND. Salem, Ms, 12th March, 1846. To Thomas Mooney, Esq. Dear Sir, —My perusal of your “History of Ireland, from its first settlement to the present time, including a particular account of its Literature, Music, Architecture and Natural Resources,” afforded me unqualified satisfaction, and infused into my soul an additional amount, if possible, of national pride; yes, such pride as the Saints of Heaven may not fear to harbor in their bosoms, even within the immediate sanctuary of God. Oh! In order to make the ever dear, yet cruelly down-trodden land of our birth, a paragon of perfection, even a mirror of admiration to the citizens of celestial glory, it seems to me that it requires only the honest co-operation of her sons at home and abroad, in the Cabinet, at the Bar, on the Bench, in the Pulpit, at the Press and in the the Study, to realize a greater, more sublime and splendid scene than was ever conceived by the gigantic mind of Archidemes o...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
SANDWICH ISLANDS, [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 March 1846

SANDWICH ISLANDS, R. A. WALSH. We have been favored with the perusal of a letter from Rev. Mr. Walsh, received by Mr. C. T. Young of this city, dated Kaveai, —i845, from which we glean the following particulars:— “ The Bishop of the mission contemplated the establishment of a press there to counteract the evil influence of Galvanism, but alas ! his lordship is missing two years, and we have not had any account of him. He sailed from France in December 1842, touched at St. Catherine’s Island, on the cast coast of South America in February 1843. We have not had the least intelligence of him since, and probably we never shall. We will ere long, I am confident, have another Bishop and a press too, but I fear that the pecuniary losses sustained by our mission,by that of the brig and cargo which the bishop intended for his and our use, will not allow us to be lavish in our expenses for some itme. There are three presses already on these islands, two owned by the American ministers and one...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
PRESIDENT POLK. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 March 1846

PRESIDENT POLK. T1IE PILOT7 SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 1846. Every one, who has watched the course of political events for the last twelve months, must have observed the unsteady and inconsistent outcries, which have been raised in the newspapers, against the administration of Mr. Polk. First, he was charged with rashness: he had committed the country on the Oregon question; and war would be the inevitable result. Then, exactly the opposite charge was brought against him: he was supine and idle. The critical state of foreign relations were pathetically described; and then the administration would be reproached most bitterly for busying itself about trifles, the dispensation of places, or the establishment of an organ, while the nation was in imminent danger. These contradictory and factious charges are not discreditable to the President. When a ipinister is assailed by the extremes of opposite parties, or upon opposing principles, it is generally a sign that his course has been moderate an...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
COLLECTOR MORTON. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 March 1846

COLLECTOR MORTON. Despotism—that principle which grows out of the corruption of human nature, which mocks the • ingenuity of man, and finds work for itself under all forms of government —despotism has many and curious ways of obtaining its ends. In the high days of Venice it dropped a note into the lion’s mouth; in Spain it gave informations to the Holy Office; in France it sought the ear of the king, or what was sometimes better, the king’s mistress. But, sadly as it may have abused the political and religious institutions of the old world, it seems equally disposed, and just as able to convert to its purpose that social and political system so peculiarly consecrated to freedom in the new. Its ways and means are even simpler and more barefaced, if anything, than in the middle ages. It seems to despise the seeresy and huggermugger of private informations and lettres de cachet; it does things openly, and defies observation. On trifling occasions, when it does not require the services...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
CHRISTIAN ALLIANCE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 March 1846

CHRISTIAN ALLIANCE. The no-Popery enterprise under the above title seems to have for its object not immediately the overthrow of the Catholic Church, but the union of the Protestant sects. It appears to be the notion of its leaders that Romaphobia is the only principle to unite the discordant elements of Protestantism. With respect to this notion, there is one thing to be observed, namely ; that those ridiculous displays of hostility and extreme partizanship weaken the moral power and rational influence, in proportion as theystrenghten the passions: just as the more innocent madness of celebral disease shatters the constitution, though it affords a temporary energy. Another thing is, they foster a controversial, sectarian temper, which creates divisions, instead of promoting union. How will the Christian Alliance men explain the fact, that Puseyisin took its rise, and gained its triumphs, chiefly, among the rabid denouncers of Popery? Bishop Phillpotts, Bishop Mant, Dr. Hook, Tresha...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
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