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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1984

BLUE RIDGE BOOKSHELF BY: PARKS LAMER, JR. (A Special Column by Readers Requests) POLLCW THE RIVER: A Novel Based on the True Ordeal of Mary Ingles by Alexander Thorn, Ballantine Book #31210, 406 pages, $3.50 paper. TRANS-ALLEGHENY PIONEERS by John P. Hale, newly edited by Harold J. Dudley, 411 Albert Ave., Wilson, N.C. 27893. $15.00 cloth; $7-95 paper from Dr. Dudley. 422 pages, with index. ESCAPE FROM INDIAN CAPTIVITY: The Story of Mary Draper Ingles and Son Thomas, edited by Roberta Ingles Steele and Andrew L. Ingles. 40 pages. $3-50 postpaid from Mrs. Steele, P.O. Box FSS, Radford, Va. 24143Virginia' s only outdoor historical drama, THE LONG WAY HOME at Radford, is based on the Indian captivity of Mary Draper Ingles in 1775- Carri ed west by the Shawnees beyond the present site of Cincinnati, Mary Ingles made her escape with an old Dutch woman, and together they followed the rivers back to Draper's Meadows, near present-day Blacksburg. Their harrowing ordeal of fourty days in the...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1984

Page 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL AUGUST, 1984 AUGUST MEETING DINNER ON THE GROUNDS OR AT THE BRIDGE Have you ever been to a real old fashioned August meeting? If you haven't, you missed one of the truly fantastic mountain events. I will tell you how I remember it. Many of these type meetings occured in many different regions of the mountains and you could spend the entire sumner going each Sunday to a different one in a different area. The second Sunday in August every year, people from all over the United States would come back to Big Reed Island for August meeting. Locals used to say, "at the bridge." This is because there was once a wooden covered bridge over Big Reed Island Creek. There still is a bridge there but it is a concrete one now since the covered bridge washed away in a flood. I still have a picture of the old wooden covered bridge. Some would say, "We're going to have dinner on the ground." To set the scene, there was a large white wood sided two story general store. (I believ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1984

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE ern hospitality goes - you have to have something to eat. They insist, "Aw, just have a piece of Aunt ?'s chicken, she makes the best," or Aunt ?'s apple butter molasses cake. These were all side events but the main happenings were around the church and the Creek. First of all, you need to know Primative Baptists (read The Man Who Moved a Mountain and The Mountain Laurel). They talk a lot and they as preachers, can and do preach all day. At the outside speaker's stand I described earlier one after the other preacher would get up and preach or lead singing, all day long, from start to finish. There was hardly room to squeeze a person in on the plank seats that lined the hillside. It was informal and people would come and go from the benches, hoping to hear their favorite preacher or song leader. While all of this was going on outside the church, inside there was also preaching and foot washing. The foot washing was done between the faithful - the elders. ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1984

Page 24 MOUNTAIN LAUREL AUGUST, 1984 MOUNTAIN MEMORIES OF CHARLES LOWELL HALL The following article was written by Charles Hall, Jr. currently an Extension Agent in Fairfax, Virginia, from a recently taped conversation with his father Charles Lowell Hall who was born in Patrick County in 18%. He is now a resident of Halifax County, Virginia where he was Extension Agent for almost 40 years. The Halls, father and son, own a 20 acre place close to Mabry Mill where Charles, Jr. hopes to retire in a couple of years. - Charlie Lowell Hall was born on February 16, 1894 (more than 90 years ago) in the Claudville comnunity of Patrick County. He was the son of Charles Thomas and Nora Flippin Hall. The Claudville comnunity is located between Stuart, Virginia and Mt. Airy, North Carolina. At the time of Lowell Hall's early youth, Andy Nunn ran a store in this comnunity and the small farm on which Mr. Hall was born was only a short distance from this store. The Post Office at that time was Batem...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1984

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE time. The closest doctor was 4 or 5 miles away. When someone got sick, someone had to go and ask the doctor to come and visit the patient. This early doctor was named Dr. Jim Leak and he later married one of the Waller sisters who taught Mr. Hall at the Mill School. Mr. Hall's father ran a thrashing machine with Mr. Hall's uncle, Boss Clark and power was furnished by a steam engine owned by the Epperson brothers. One grandson of the Eppersons was a professor in the Agronomy Department at VPI in recent years. When tobacco was marketed it was hauled in wagons much like western covered wagons with bows and canvas on top. Food and provisions were carried from home for the entire trip under the wagon seat. Corn and fodder for the horses also had to be taken. When a load of tobacco was taken to Winston-Salem, it took four days to make the trip. Two days to go and two days to return. "We camped at a campground enroute. The second day was spent in Winston-Salem,...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1984

Page 26 MOUNTAIN LAUREL AUGUST, 1984 NOT CRAZY ENOUGH A TALE BY G.M. ALLEN (When we left the story last month, Tressie, tired of looking agter her younger brothers and sisters, had decided to elope with Nick. Although he was raised in a moonshining family, Tressie was sure he wouldn't go that way himself. As the story picks up this month, Nick has just come for Tressie and it is time to make the decision of a lifetime. Nick has just said, "Are you ready, Tress?") "Yes, I reckon," Tress replied. Her mother wailed louder. "Don't carry on so, Ma," Tressie begged her mother. Lutie and Dovie began crying and begging too. "Don't go, Tres- sie." Suddenly little Les assaulted Nick, harrmering him with both fists. "You can't take T'essie! You can't take T'essie!" he cried. Nick caught both his hands, laughing. Les got loose and came at him with the poker. Nick took it away, and Tressie picked up the angry child. "I'll come back real soon, Les," she promised, then let him down, for he was wip...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1984

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE. was at the top of a rock bluff. Hearing voices, she approached cautiously, and holding to a scraggly oak sapling, she peered over the edge. Then she dodged back, and on all fours, crept closer, until she could plainly hear what was being said. This was a "still" place, all right! There were several vessels setting around and something coppery could be glimpsed beyond sane bushes. A small stream from a spring arose at the foot of the bluff and smoke was drifting up over the edge. Nick and Pete Haden were sitting on a log directly below, and as she watched, they turned U P a jug* and each took a long drink. "Thought ye said ye left Tressie wait in' at the road, and you-all had started to git married," Pete remarked. "Yeah, but you got to get a woman used to waitin' on you early! If you don't you might end up havin' to wait on her," Nick drawled. "She ain't as pretty as that Sirrmons girl you used to go with," Pete said. "Well, she is a good worker, though...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1984

Page 28 MOUNTAIN LAUREL AUGUST, 1984 Thomas F. Clark was born August 4, iB6O in the isolated mountains of Western North Carolina, in what is now Avery County, near a rambling water-way called Harper's Creek. The beautiful mountains and rolling hills sheltered the hardy souls who settled in the valleys and misty shadowed hollows. Thomas married Susan Braswell around the year 1880. He built a cabin for his bride near his homeplace in the vicinity of Harper's Creek. The cabin has long since rotted away, leaving nothing to mark the spot except an old apple tree that at one time graced their front yard. The spring is still there, and its water is cold and refreshing as it emerges from the earth at the foot of a huge spruce. The over-flow bubbles its way into a crystal stream which is only about eighteen inches in width. From there it winds down the valley to become part of the larger waters of Harper's Creek. When grandma and grandpa began housekeeping, their luxuries were few. They live...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1984

BACKROADS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 32 walking and offered him a ride. He accepted my invitation, climbed in the car and inmediately began pointing out the sites of long disappeared homes and businesses. At one spot he announced, "This here's Mortimer." The few old deserted and delapidated buildings that I had passed without thought were once Mortimer, North Carolina. There was no trace of a railroad then but my new friend informed me, "That building over there was the depot and that one over there was the hotel". Tall weeds and underbrush almost completely hid the buildings then, but not from the old man's memories. He told how there used to be a cotton mill and sure enough, as he pointed, I saw concrete walls standing in the woods. The outline of the buildings could easily be seen and all the walls were intact but there were no windows, roof, door and even the area within the walls was now covered with a growth of large trees. My first reaction was, "What Happened?" The old man informed...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1984

Page 30 MOUNTAIN LAUREL AUGUST, 1984 BACKROADS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 29 great you as you walk up the steps to the store. Mr. Coffey has operated this store for 4$ years, of which he was postmaster of Edgemont. The old Post Office window is still in the rear of the store, although it is no longer a post office. The store is filled to the brim with antiques which are not for sale, but Mr. Coffee obviously enjoys explaining the uses and history of the various items. On three separate occasions, the floor boards of this store have been under flood water - in 1895, 1916 and again in 1940. Mr. Coffey recalls August 13, 1940 as, "A day I'll never forget". It had rained all night and morning brought no relief. Wilson Creek in front of the store was getting dangerously high, so Archie and Mrs. Coffey opened the front and back doors of the store, hoping the raging waters would pass through rather than carry the building away, and started climbing Jonas Ridge, which rises almost vertically behin...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1984

Since our first issue in March 1983, the first objective of The Mountain Laurel was to preserve the heritage and tradition of the Blue Ridge Mountains. The overwhelming support of our readers and advertising sponsors has made that objective a reality. Too often, in today's world, the important emotions are left unstated We don't want that to happen with those who have made our dreams become reality. Thank you all from "the heart of the Blue Ridge." AUGUST, 1984 MOUNTAIN LAUREL Page 31 "Mountain Made and Grown" Along U.S. Highway 52 FOR MOUNTAIN HOSPITALITY AT ITS BEST, COME TO CANA AND FANCY GAP, VIRGINIA COOL MOUNTAIN BREEZES, FIELD RIPENED FRUIT & VEGATABLES, SMILING FACES AND A "MAKE YOU FEEL AT HOME" ATMOSPHERE PLUS NATURE'S FINEST SCENERY ALL AWAIT YOU ALONG US 52. COME SEE WHAT OUR MOUNTAINS HAVE TO OFFER! I. CANA PRODUCE HILLSVILLE, VA. FRESH FRUIT & VEGETABLES 12 1 1 LARGE SELECTION OF ONLY THE BEST! FANCY GAP 2* WICKER OUTLET P.O. 9 "ALWAYS UNDER RET...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1984

HEART OF THE BLUE RIDGE TXount&M A © Copyright 1984 Laurel Publications Inc. AUGUST 1984 jLaUfSI Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life A self-guided monthly tour of Mountain Backroads "tbackr<M!^ by because of fear of getting lost. Each month this column eliminates this concern by giving directions over mountain backroads to some of the most picturesque places throughout the "Heart of the Blue Ridge". Whether you're a resident or a long distance neighbor, we're sure you will enjoy this area's beauty. In the early 1960'5, I spent a week deer hunting in Pisgah National Forrest. My base camp was the tiny mountain comnunity of Edgemont, North Carolina, which is located about 25 miles north of Morganton, North Carolina. Edgemont consisted primarily of Mr. Coffey's Store. It was an old timey general store with everything from hoop cheese to kerosene lanterns. I remember the place had the smell of a fresh oiled gun. In those days, it seemed to me as if it were straight ou...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

September, 1984 !\loiitlilv Journal Of Mountain LilV THE MOUNTAIN VIEW MISSION SCHOOL Mountain View School days hold many memories for me. How I wish the old school house was still standing on road 764 across from Conner's View Church! As I share this story with you, I know that other people's memory will be going back to childhood days. Mountain View was started as a mission school supported by the Methodist Church with the building being built in the early 1900's. It was the best equipped rural school in our area. I remember the library and reading almost every book there. Generations of families attended this school. My mother and father went to this school as I did, years later. My first day of school stands out vividly in my mind. The little ones went and played with the older ones at recess. I remember a game called, "Double Tap" and I had a good time my first day. Summers at Mountain View School were really lots of fun. We built playhouses all over the woods. The Conner's Vie...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

Page 2 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1984 MOUNTAIN ELLIOTT MEMORIES OF HARMON Elliott Harmon was born December 25, 1899- He was the first of three surviving children born to Francis Martin and Georgia Kitterman Harmon. The family was native to Floyd County, Virginia in what was then the "East View" neighborhood. Today Elliott and his wife, Nancy Dillon Harmon, still live in a house on a dirt road off US Highway 221 that Elliott's father built. Originally, the house was only two rooms but later an upper story was added, then when Elliott was a young adult, he helped his father add on a back wing. When Elliott was a mere lad of eight or nine years old, he spent a lot of time with his grandfather. It was the memory of those stories his grandfather told him that caused him to contact The Mountain Laurel. His grandfather was Austin Harmon, Major in the army of the Confederate States of America. Elliott said he was always called "Major". Major Harmon was born in 1835 and died in 1914. Elliot...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

"MOUNTAIN VIEW SCHOOL" Continued from page 1. stick a big bolt in the center and presto, a merry go round! She says they would lay over the board and go around and around. Winters, when I went to school were fun also. There were lots of snow for snowmen, board riding down the hills and lots of snowball fights. Sometimes when it was snowing and I walked to school, my eyelashes would get heavy with snow. People are always commenting on my long eyelashes. Perhaps it was the snow. On really bad days, our parents would come and meet us, making sure we got home safely. Once, snow was over the fence posts and the temperature was very cold. That day Mom and Daddy wouldn't let me start walking to school. I cried to go and Daddy told me, "It's so cold out there, if you stick a nail on your lip, the hide will come off". I tried that and Daddy was right, the nail stuck to my lip and I cried some more. Inside the school house on wintry days, we were cozy - gathered around the old wood stove doin...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

Page 4 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1984 CALEB AND HENRY "Feels sorta strange sneaking out of your own heme, don't it Caleb?" "Well, if our kids catch on to our camping trip plans, they'd camp out on our door step to see that we didn't go and I been looking forward to this for weeks." Caleb and Henry stood in the early morning light shouldering the gear they had packed up for a two day stay down in the Dan River Gorge. "I didn't used to have near this much trouble convincing my mama to let me go camping when I was a boy!" "I know what you mean, Henry. 1% youngun's say, 'but you'll get snake bit'. I was watching out for snakes before they was born. Had to if you lived up in a hollow back when I was a boy. Wasn't a child I knew that couldn't spot a snake and steer clear of 'em. We even caught snakes once in a while and played a prank or two. Never been bit yet!" The two old men made one last check to make sure they weren't forgetting anything important like coffee and were on their way....

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

NOTICE TO BUSINESSES: The following article is an attempt on our part to attract new advertisers for THE MOUNTAIN LAUREL. It seems that most of our time is spent seeking advertising sponsors rather than seeking out the memories and stories which make the mountains and mountain people so special. If you own or manage a business, please read the following and give THE MOUNTAIN LAUREL your consideration. There is a part of our past that is rapidly disappearing and with your support, a part of that bygone era can be preserved for generations to come. Your support is needed and appreciated by THE MOUNTAIN LAUREL, as well as our readers. Please join our family of advertising sponsors. A contribution to the past is an investment in your future. WHY IS THE MOUNTAIN LAUREL ONE OF MY BEST ADVERTISING BUYS? By combining magazine longevity (30 days) and newspaper format (low cost) THE MOUNTAIN LAUREL can offer you an ad that lasts a month, rather than a day or week, at the lowest possible price...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

Page 6 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1984 HOW TIMES HAVE CHANGED Before I talk about how times have changed, I want to tell you about sane more fishing trips. There is a creek called Greasy Creek that runs through Floyd and Carroll County. While fishing up above Raven Rock in Carroll County, some women were fishing up above me, one girl and some little children were below me at another hole fishing. All at once I heard an awful lot of hollering and talking. One of the women up above me had caught a grampus or as you might say, a water dog. They thought they had caught a young alligator. One of them yelled, "Hey Matilda, get them younun's out of here. I just caught a young alligator and the old ones are bound to be around here some place! Let's get out of here while we can!" Garnet Rakes ordered a new fishing reel he said was so fast that when he caught a fish, it pulled it in so fast it left a hole in the water. Now, that's what I call fast! Now I will talk some about how things have c...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

NOTES: FLOYD COUNTY ARTS & CRAFTS FESTIVAL On Saturday, October 13 and Sunday, October 14th, the Floyd County Woman's Club, Inc. will be sponsoring The Floyd County Arts and Crafts Festival at the Floyd County High School. This is an event which has grown and is looked forward to each year. It offers something for everyone to enjoy. There will be catagories in fine arts and photography judged by professionals with additional awards given by the Blue Ridge Bank, a Best in Show Award and an award determined by the viewing public's ballots. Everyone from near and far is eligible for entry. For more entry information, call 703-745-4304, dixie Nichols or 703-651-8264» June Trombold. Other catagories on display for judging will be crafts and fresh and canned fruits and vegetables. If you wish to set up a booth to sell crafts, the charge will be $3.00. Call 703-745-2149, Mrs. Dale Harter or 703-745-2153, Mrs. A.M. Phelegar for more information. There will be a "Little Miss" con...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

Page 8 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1984 THE PINNACLES PROJECT By: George V. Hill The City of Danville 1 s Pinnacles Hydro-Electric operation begun in 1936, was conceived sane 40 years earlier by Judge J. Singleton Diggs who, while trout fishing in the Dan River, became impressed by the raw fury and power of the river as it thundered over the Great Falls and dropped a total of 600 feet between Round Meadow Creek and the head of Kibler Valley. Judge Diggs conceived the idea of an upstream dam feeding a Kibler powerhouse generating low cost power for street lights and houses in nearby towns. Seeing an investment opportunity, he began, in 1895, to buy key tracts of land. Over the next nine years he purchased 1200 or more acres from John Barnard, James Turman and others. But then, seeking a town or a power company to buy his idea and his land, he was unsuccessful. Probably ahead of his time in those early days of electric power, he was unable to find a buyer. In 1919, having held his land...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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