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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1989

April, 1989 Extension head takes leave BLACKSBURG - Dr. Mitch Geasler, director of the Virginia Cooperative Extension Service, is taking a one-year leave of absence from Virginia Tech to head a national panel studying future directions for Extension programs. In doing so, Geasler resigned as viceprovost and Extension director effective April 1. Virginia Tech President Dr. James McComas praised Geasler for his national reputation in Extension programs, and said he would take the opportunity of the leadership change to reevaluate the structure of Extension in Virginia. Virginia Farm Bureau Federation President Wayne Ashworth welcomed that idea. "I think if we restructured to get Extension and agricultural education programs under one department, that would benefit farmers," Ashworth said. In addition, Ashworth said some farmers felt Virginia Extension programs had shifted their focus away from agriculture, and he would welcome a reemphasis on farm research and education. Some ignored ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1989

6 Greene women see hope in recycling By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON VFBF News Editor Joanne Burkholder and Caroline Hershey have a laughable vision of themselves bumping down Greene County highways in big, clanky wreckers, determined to rid the countryside of ugly junk cars. You see, they were successful at establishing a recycling center in their county in just 10 months, so a supervisor half-seriously suggested they tackle junk cars next. The two Greene County Farm Bureau Women's Committee members aren't sure they want to drive wreckers, but they are sure recycling of glass, paper, aluminum and even oil is making a difference in the rural county of about 9,000 people. It's saving space in the county landfill and future taxpayers' dollars. Somewhere inside of Mrs. Burkholder was an interest in recycling she didn't even know she had until an old classmate, Earl Morris, uncovered it. He told her his company, Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co. of Central Virginia, has an employee who instructs various g...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1989

April, 1989 | & mLgm H >ay- f I Igji M J ■*& A V ? x **, -A*& - * # :ap j|l E^fl Virginia Peacock (second from right) accepts Loudoun's award from Helen Neese, state chairman. They are flanked by Ann Shomaker (left) and Evelyn Laycock. (Photo by Randal Shavis) Loudoun women get top award; others honored Loudoun County's Women's Committee was named most outstanding committee as well as outstanding committee for the Northern District. Women's Committee activities in this growing county in 1988 included writing letters to congressmen about the diesel fuel tax issue and to the Department of Labor on the home work issue. This committee distributed placemats encouraging voting. Members monitored meetings of the county board of supervisors and the ag advisory committee and farm organizations. They sponsored a blood pressure check and co-sponsored a chain saw seminar with Southern States. During Agriculture Week they put 300 Food for Thought pl...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1989

8 Washington lobbying trip was successful PI Rep. Payne (left) speaks and Farm Bureau member J.P. Davis conducts meeting. (Continued from Page 1) help Southwest Virginia develop new industry and jobs. Robb, who is on the Senate Budget Committee, said he has been doing some rabble rousing there and is frustrated at its "inability to talk about the real thing" — honest budgetary action. "The concept that we can continue to spend a lot more than we take in is foolish," he said. Robb said he does not want to raise federal taxes and did not raise state taxes when he was governor. But, he would like to see spending in line with revenue, which will require tough decisions, he said "Until we're willing to belly up to the bar and spread the discomfort across the board, we're not getting anywhere," said Robb. Warner, who donned the "No New Taxes" button Farm Bureau members gave him, said he has a reputation for "standing like a stone wall" against outspending revenue. 1990 Farm Bill Payne, wh...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1989

April, 1989 Farm Bureau Blue Cross renewal best ever For the first time in many years, there will be no rate increase in June for more than 10,000 Farm Bureau members in the Blue Cross group. "This good news was made possible by those Farm Bureau members in the Preferred Rated Plans 200 and 500 who used their benefits wisely and kept claims low," said Wayne Ashworth, VFBF president. "The VFBF State Board of Directors also deserves credit for the tough, but positive decisions they have made over the years," he said. "From the prospective of one who has worked on both the Virginia and American Farm Bureau Federation Rural Health advisory committees, I can tell you that Farm Bureau's health care plan has been well-managed over the years," he said. "With the rates and benefit options we will offer in 1989 and 1990 and the excellent local service offered by our county Farm Bureau office secretaries, our Blue Cross group will serve members well and will continue to be an effective members...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1989

10 Young Farmers off to good start in '89 This year got off to a great start for Young Farmers' activities in Virginia. We had an extremely successful conference in Williamsburg during which we had the opportunity to share ideas and concerns with Young Farmers from across the state and the nation. Since the state Young Farmers' conference, many of our districts have had their meetings and have set dates for their summer picnics. I'd like to thank those committees who submitted Phase I of the Involvement Program by March 1 to be eligible for the Outstanding Chairman 1989 competition. For those committees who have not submitted Phase I yet, you have up to 30 days after your first organizational meeting to send it. This year's winners for the outstanding chairman event will receive a travel package to the American Farm Bureau Federation Young Farmer and Rancher Leadership Conference in Tulsa, OK in February 1990. If you have any questions regarding this contest, please contact the Youn...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1989

April, 1989 Professional Bird Dog Training. Broke dogs for sale on occasion. Foothill Kennels. Chilhowie. Evenings 703-646-3992. Registered Polled Shorthorn Service Age Bulls. Also a few open heifers. 703-825-0590. For Sale: Double-Registered Walking & Racking yearling colts. Registered Saddlebred mare due to foal in April. 703-789-4613. Arabian Stallion Standing Stud, $250.00, 804-237-0292. Registered miniature horses for sale, 31"-34" tall 804-994-5247. For Sale: Double Black Polled Simmentals Bulls, Heifers, Cows. HOUNSHELL BLACK SIMMENTAL FARMS, 703-686-4055. English Setter puppies, Registered. Good stock. Ready June. $50 deposit holds. $200. 804-769-3560, Newtown, Vn Red foxsie Registered Border collies with green hypnotic eyes. 12 weeks old. 703-429-5706. Registered Quarter Horses all ages, broodmares, colts, broke horses, show prospects. 703-745-2092. FOR SALE: Arabian gelding, reg. 3 years, wellmannered, halter broke. $800. Half Arab mare 10 years. Needs experien...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1989

Farm Bureau Aren't there enough risks in farming without the unnecessary ones? Vol. 4s, No. 3 THE VOICE OF VIRGINIA'S AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS April, 1989 ' * fMii Jvk ■ W ■ «| n^^HH^^nHnHffi^Kl^;;, - Ji|lV PP I ' * 5 -1 V | '^,[<-/». • 9 p v . -r- * *""* ""i^f^l -; . JttoMA ■ ~ m ■ ■ "VHHHHHBHHHi We have policies that offer income protection from crop loss, policies that not only protect your crop from hail but also fire. And the premiums are tax deductible. We offer protection for building and livestock, and every insurance program is tailored to fit your individual needs. Why take the risk? Call your local Virginia farm Bureau Mutual Insurance advisor today. Because you're still growing, we're still growing. " A;... /•V ■ • .■:::-...' r ,:, :. -% <• Sg |fS, - 1\ X 4* & ' - To a farmer the weather that he depends on so much can also be his biggest hazard. Consider that the majority of all livestock losses are caused by lightning. A destructive hail ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1989

Vol. 48, No. 5 Kleckner says EC blocking GATT progress By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON VFBF News Editor NATURAL BRlDGE—Agricultural trade is a key topic in the current round of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (G ATT) negotiations, but the talks are "in deep trouble," according to American Farm Bureau Federation President Dean Kleckner. "It is in very real trouble because of the foolhardy attitude of the European Economic Community in rejecting virtually every positive proposal," he said at Congressman Jim Olin's Economic Conference at the Natural Bridge Hotel, April 3. "Why talk about something like this at 1 meeting like this? A lack of trade will substantially reduce farm and ranch incomes and lower the living standards of every person in this country," he said. Kleckner, during this visit to Virginia and an April 4 press conference in Washington, was not optimistic prior to the GATT session that began April 5 in Geneva, Switzerland. He told reporters the United States should no...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1989

2 How may we better serve you today? A Farm Bureau membership is worth hundreds, even thousands, of dollars annually, depending on how you use it. We have a good product now, but we want to improve and strengthen our organization. And with your help, we will. You can help us better serve you by answering a service questionnaire that soon will be sent to 3,000 members at random across the state. If you stop and think about it, your Farm Bureau dollar is at work for you even if you do nothing more in the organization than join and renew your membership. For instance, during the winter months, Farm Bureau lobbyists are making our voices heard in the General Assembly in Richmond to help create a better way of life for rural Virginians. Meanwhile, American Farm Bureau Federation lobbyists and state leaders are in Washington, ensuring that farmers as a group are getting fair treatment on Capitol Hill. If you carry any Farm Bureau in New farm payment eligibility rules sticky By now, most V...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1989

May, 1989 County drives reaching farmers and friends (Continued from Page 1) batteries, and other implements, leadership programs, commodity marketing, a travel service, a pharmaceutical mail order house, and a free subscription and free monthly classified advertising in this 90,000-circulation newspaper. Others simply join to share in the conservative, basic rural American philosophy of Farm Bureau, which lobbies in Richmond and Washington. The prospect nodded his approval and wrote a check for $30. It isn't always that easy. But once the services of Farm Bureau are revealed, it's hard to say no, volunteers noted. Carroll County took a similar approach and conducted one of the most successful drives in Virginia so far. Membership volunteers told prospects about the growing number of urban legislators and the need for a stronger rural voice. In addition to the many economic services, Lowery points out other important reasons to join. "We are involved in all rural concerns: clean wat...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1989

4 VFBF takes farm safety to future partners By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON VFBF News Editor HILLSVILLE—"When I was coming along on a farm in Fluvanna County, there were two speeds on a tractor — stop and wide open," said Norman C. Wilkinson, safety specialist for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. Many of the 191 FFA members gathered in the Carroll County High School auditorium April 7 smiled or chuckled. They could identify with that. But they shook their heads at the carelessness of a farmer whose mangled tractor was flashed on a screen before them. The man had shifted his vehicle into neutral to go faster down a hill, but he wasn't badly hurt. Some less fortunate victims were shown in other slides, like a farmer who drove his tractor on the road intoxicated after losing his automobile driver's license for drunk driving, a woman who Spring Sale Yfeu Save Thousands! Nfe Guarantee Results ———— Por a limited time, you can enjoy special savings on selected models of our quality steel buildi...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1989

May, 1989 First deer damage control results given Note: Two new deer management programs were implemented in Virginia for the 1988 hunting season. Results of one of those, the Damage Control Assistance Program (DCAP), which is geared to landowners who want to prevent crop damage, will be discussed in this article. Next month, you will read about the Deer Management Assistance Program (DMAP), designed to help landowners and hunt clubs improve deer herd management. By 808 DUNCAN and DR. VIRGIL KOPF Dept. of Game and Inland Fisheries Virginia's deer management is based on the premise that deer herds can best be managed by control of the total mortality that occurs to the female segment of the population through the number of days that antlerless deer can be legally harvested. The two main goals of this approach are to provide as much deer hunting opportunity as possible without harming the resource and to provide for population control necessary for herd health and to minimize crop dam...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1989

6 j&s y< ■ -«■ 1"' * p *tf^'' H ' ■■"■ K if m : *; m %€ •"-yn ML imm **9 " "' ii ! »jF »* ** - v jjj^M J^tiP 1 * V "* : tl§ -i 2 %T. Barbara and Dan Gill can do special jobs with their sawmill. (Photo by Kathy B. Springston) A team: she saws, he sells By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON VFBF News Editor REMLlK—History's ears have heard many sounds at Remlik Hall Farm in Middlesex County. There were the voices of Colonists, the throbbing of famous horses racing and the gobble of turkeys. Now, a large electric bandsaw sings its way through massive logs, as cattle low in the fields and waterfowl squawk over Legrange Creek, which abutts the 450-acre farm. Long-time Farm Bureau members Dan and Barbara Gill operate a unique custom sawing and lumber service there, in addition to raising Devon cattle, corn, beans and small grains. The sawmill is set up in the same building that used to be an eccentric multi-millionaire's circular, indoor horse track and later a turkey brood house ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1989

May, 1989 ■Pl Virginia farm numbers drop WASHINGTON—The number of Virginia farms dropped from 51,859 in 1982 to 44,799 in 1987, according to an advance report by the Commerce Department's Census Bureau. Land in farm use also declined from 9.4 million acres to fewer than 8.7 million over that period, according to the 1987 Agricultural Census. Statistician Tom Manning said one of the most dramatic changes was a drop in the amount of corn raised for grain or seed in Virginia. "Sales of corn went from 58 million bushels to 28 million bushels during the period. That's about a third as much in five years," Manning said. The report also showed $465 million, or 29 percent of total agricultural sales were for crops, while $1.12 billion or 71 percent came from the sale of livestock, poultry and their products. Copies of the census will be for sale in a few months. Contact Manning at 301-763-1113 for information on how to order one. Fish farming opportunity on the rise GLOUCESTER POINT-Both st...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1989

8 Driving force behind health cost increases What can be done to lower, or even slow down the rising costs of health care? Last year that was a $541 billion question. That figure represents more than 11 percent of the U.S. gross national product spent on health care. Before any solutions can be proposed, you first have to understand the forces that keep driving up those costs. And that is exactly what 47 county Farm Bureau presidents and other leaders spent time coming to grips with during their conference this winter in Lynchburg. The prices of all medical services are affected by inflation, but most people do not pay for specific medical items routinely enough to notice simple inflation increases. The biggest medical cost for most of us is the check we write to Blue Cross each month. Or, for others who are employed off the farm, it's that "health insurance" payroll deduction line on our pay check. Since that is the most obvious cost, it is a good one to start with. Even if your he...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1989

May, 1989 Now Virginians Have A Fighting Chance Ear Gooa Health Care Protection With Rites Beginning/Vt liider 850. The struggle to budget for . . I ~ ~ through May 31, 1990. health care insurance is over Virginia rarm Bureau Rating Zones And, if you need help in when you select the Virginia a hurry, you'll like our conFarm Bureau's new Choice- Mi Area 1: $50.46* JyOL venient service. Care 1000 plan. ■■ Area 2: $42.89* /Vnoß There are 88 local County In fact, you may pay as ,—. /Va Farm Bureau's offices throughlittle as $35.32 a month for L j Area $3532* / y out the state. Not to menup to a $1,000,000 in Blue .Monthly C oscfo r individuals /TvA iff tion special Blue Cross and Cross and Blue Shield of age 29 or under. / yC // / Blue Shield toll-free stateVirginia health care benefits. /// wide assistance. For many, our low monthly / (a/ So, if you've given up on rates could mean the differ- finding affordable health ence between affordable —7 / \ care coverage, call or visit protecti...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1989

10 Virginia Alar testing shows low residue (Continued from Page 1) period in 1988 and 335,000 bushels in 1987, he noted. In addition, shipments of apples for processing came to 219,000 bushels in March, compared to 245,000 bushels last year and 282,000 bushels in 1987. Schools responded quickly In Virginia, at least four major school districts in Richmond, Newport News, Henrico and Fairfax counties took apples and apple products off lunch menus in mid-March. School officials said they couldn't afford to take a chance with the health of their charges, and didn't return the apples to cafeterias until they were reassured by the USD A and the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services their apple supplies were free of Alar contamination. Don Ayers, director of commodity services for VDACS, said an assortment of 113 samples collected and tested so far by the Bureau of Food Inspection showed Alar residues in only 9 samples at levels ranging from 1.0 to 2.8 parts per million ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1989

May, 1989 For Sale: Reg. Angus Bulls, Al Sired, Performance Tested, 700-900 lbs, $650 up. 703-773-2262. Registered Angus Bulls, Kadence Shoshone, Line backer, Pine Drive Big Sky, Premier Progressor, Bloodlines. $600. 804-288-9000. Chinese Shar-Pei puppies (Wrinkles). Call for information. Different prices. Payment plan. 703-885-6368. Registered Angus Bulls, Pine Drive Big Sky Bloodline, $800. Amelia. 804-561-2490. Ar Shud Hexel 16.2 Trakehner, special rate for Farm Bureau members $400. 804-842-3085. Corinth Hill quality Anglo-trakehners, boarding, training, lessons. Competitive rates. 804-842-3085. New Horse and Cattle Trailers. Phillips Trailer Sales. Rt. 5 Abingdon, Va. 703-475-3663. BRAHMAN CATTLE, DIAMOND B FARM, REGISTERED, GENTLE, POWHATAN, VA. 804-794-1209. Wanted. 10 to 20 Mallard Duck Hens. Phone 804-749-3139. Russell A. Bourne. Stud Service: Three Quarterhorse Stallions, Top Quality Blood Lines. Call 804-977-2975 after 5:00 p.m. HANOVERIAN SPORTHORSES. Come see our fools a...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1989

DHBHBHHj Aren't there enouah ri«lr« Aren t tnere enougn risks in farming without the unnecessary ones? ' ■ SF :. ' f> ■ • ' '/Uv' , ■HBHnni : a ' * ■ *w i t/M , m|2 ' *, s« * * •. *% life ▲* » s Jifcflyk.. > -J <9^B ■'"!' ■HHIHHHHHHIHHk!—.. ..... ~> ' i n » i *"'"" " Vol. 48, No. 5 THI VOICE OF VIRGINIA'S AGRICULTURAL PRO&&«|, F . May, 1989 County Farm Bureaus Growing MBUUU|HhB Jjf . on kßh w mmkw^Lfjug ■HHHBnCL ni| - ill ■ . We have policies that offer income protection from crop loss, policies that not only protect your crop from hail but also fire. And the premiums are tax deductible. We offer protection for building and livestock, and every insurance program is tailored to fit your individual needs. Why take the risk? Call your local Virginia farm Bureau Mutual Insurance advisor today. Because you're still growing, we're still growing. To a farmer the weather that he depends on so much can also be his biggest ha...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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