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Title: Prahran Chronicle Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 15,450 items from Prahran Chronicle, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Prahran Chronicle — 7 February 1914

If~ LYRIC Theatre, l ESPLANADE, ST. KILDA. Cb Butterflies EVERY EVENING, SWet or Fine. At 8.30. STAR PICTURES INCLUDING THE LYRIC GAZETTE. At 8 p.m. Prices, 2/-, 1/6, 1/- and 6d. Box Plan at Allan's, and Solomon's, Grey Streiet. TELEPHONE 3464 Windsor. St. Kilda Beach. BE SURE AND SEE THE Every Evening at 8.30. Programmes always Entertaining. WILL. and ROB. THOMAS. ST. KILDA ESPLANADE EVERY EVENING 8.3o O'Clock. H. N. Gregory's o Musical Costume Comedy Co. Daffodils S.eptuna it Champion Lady Swimmer and Diver in her Famous Glass Tank Act. h Commencing Saturday. S Prices-Is. 6d. (Saturdays, 2s.), is. and ?d " Box plan at Allan's and Van Breda Floral Studio SSaturdays, from 4 p.m. Other nights from 7.30 p.m. at Theatre. 'Phone, Windsor, 3506. Managing Director ... J. SUTTON CROW. 'PRAHRAN'S PALATIAL PLAYHOUSE' -THE - ,LYRIC Theatre, Chapel Street, Prahran. Virl, i's First lTheatre in Melbourne' Suburbs. 'Ihe im st Mlagnificintly appointed Theatre in Victoria. Naturally hleated on Co'a...

Publication Title: Prahran Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Prahran Chronicle — 7 February 1914

fRASERI _ MORPHET FOR GOOD PRINTING GLOBE -DYE WORKS. 1 ~5~tSavi the Cost of Winter Outfits by DRY OLEANItQ or DYEING the Dark Shades now Fa.hlonable. S- Ladies' Costumes Cleaned from .. ... 5/ THE E GLOBE Ladies' Costume Dyed S from ... . Ladies' Blouses Cleaned I from ... ... 1/3 Gentlemen's Suits Cleaned from ... .. 4/ Gentlemen's Suits Dyed from ... ... 56 Gloves Clesane Odorless 3d pr Lace Curtains and other Furnishings Cleaned and Dyed, FURS REMODELLED Ostrich Feathers Cleaned and Dyed all the New and Fashionable Shades. RECEIVING OFFICES: 27 CHAPEL STREET, near Windsor Station; 156 GREVILLE STREET, near Town Hall; TOORAK ROAD, two doors south Yarra Station; GLENFERRIE R.D, Malvern. High St, WINDSOR, I door from Chapel St. TEL. i7o6 WINSDOR. Wdrks-4o, 4!, 44 Ellis St., S. Yarra, offChapel -t. Phone 1755, Windsor Ex. SAW AND MOULDING MILLS, DU KE STREET, WINDSOR, Opp. .FALLON'S, Drapers, Chapel Street. Wmn. Marsh & Sons _ BUILDERS and CONTRACTORS. LIME. MAN I'ELPIECES S...

Publication Title: Prahran Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE BITER BIT. [Newspaper Article] — Prahran Chronicle — 7 February 1914

THE BITER BIT. There are Io doctors rn Tory Is land; off thi Irish coast, so. they sen: to the mainland when medical helY is needed. 'The inhabitants are very poor, and on one occasion, when a doctor was urgently needed, the only one within reach was a canny Scot, who re fused to go over to the island until he received his fee of £1. The fee was collected and paid, and the doctor went over to the island and did what was necessary. "When his work was done he found it im possible to get back to the main land .unless he raid th- b:oatman'£2. He parted With the *'siller" with a very bad grace, and as he did so the boatman said : F'Ye'll maybe come a. hit cheaper tae a puir patient n Xt time."

Publication Title: Prahran Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW FAMOUS NOVELS HAVE BEEN WRITTEN. [Newspaper Article] — Prahran Chronicle — 7 February 1914

10ilOW, FAMOUS NOVELS _FAVE BEEN WRITTEN. + . Mr..Arnold Benn2tt,- in his preface to ' a new edition of his well , nown book,"The Old Wives' Tale," gives an interesting acebunt of how he hit upon the plot and wrote the story. In 1903 Mr. Bennett was in the habit of frequenting a certain Parisian restaurant. Cne ni- ht a queer old woman. a mass of oddi ties and eccentricities, came in'o the restaurant and set everybody laaugh :n. at her. Mr. Bennett reflected that the poor, grotesque old crea ture had once been young and, like Iy (nough, charming. "At 11this in stant," he says, "'I was visited, by the idea of writing a- book, which I :icmately. becarse the '.Old Wives ' Tale.' " \ ipeep into the library wor'.shos of.o:lier: leading novelists of the day,] reveals some clrious facts regarding their methods of w\-orkl--ethos which are as '.ariolis as they are interest-. Sr.::I-IHal Caine, for instance, first :evolves? en` idea'- which he thinks will pro:.e "th-- groundwork - f a story. ...

Publication Title: Prahran Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE WEATHER. WHY DO PEOPLE TALK ABOUT IT? [Newspaper Article] — Prahran Chronicle — 7 February 1914

THE WEATHER. 4- WHY DO PEOPLE TALK ABOUT IT ? When a dozen people meet before dinner, half of them strangers to the others-I don't mean the pleasant anticipation of converse hi-n friends who know each other find they are going, to din; 'in company-if they are skilled performers they may end something at once to talk about which has promise in it and may lead somewhere. If not, while they are interrogating each other's looks they begin with the weather, a subject in exhaustible because empty. It is one of the few topics upon which every one knows as much, or as little, as every one else, and being neutral, it serves to bring people ac quainted without compromising any one. If we began at once upon poli tics, art, or literature, we might give offence or draw a blank. The he or she to whom we are set up to talk may have no ideas, if so the weather will reveal it ; may have ideas, if so we shall soon get away from the weather. But why begin so at all ? What we are saying to ourselves is...

Publication Title: Prahran Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BOER HORSEBREAKERS. [Newspaper Article] — Prahran Chronicle — 7 February 1914

-. BOER HORSEBREAKERS. • . ..,---~-4 , Al{ost :as soon as he can walk the young Boer is taught to ride, and consequently it is not to be won dered at that as he grows up he be comes.very expert at handling horses. The Boer method of hrca ing in young horses.. for its simplicity and effi ciency is worthy of description. It is usually to break in a young horse when he 'is two years old, as he is not yet fully matured and is con sequently easier to handle than an 'older and stronger animal would be. It' being decided to break in a young colt, the whole mob of brood mares and their progeny is driven into a- "kraal," this being an en closure surrounded by a high stone wall. The next step is to separate the colt from the rest and drive him into a corner by himself, which is done after a little trouble. The trainer next gets a lasso ready, which with the aid of a long stick he throws over the colt's head. Immediately the horse charges off like a mad thing, but does not get far, as ' helper...

Publication Title: Prahran Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ARE WOMEN WITTY? SOME OF THEIR SAYINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Prahran Chronicle — 7 February 1914

ARE WOMEN WITTY ? SOME OF THEIR SAYIN?(& The witty sayings of some good womcn have come down to us. It was Lady Montagu who said the only thing that reconciled her to be ing a woman was that she would never have to marry one. Jane Carlyle, Miss Mitford, Fanny Burney, Hannah Bore, and other women of that day had witty say ings accredited to them. Frances Power Cobbe went to .- ,-- e. drawing-room one day when she was very lame 'from a sprained ankle. As she limped in, the man at the door announced in a loud tone, r'Miss Cobble." To which she promptly added, "No ; Miss Hobble." Of course, one might say the sense of humour and the gift of wit are two distinct things. That depends on what one accepts as a definition of wit, and again of humour. But, after all, who wants to take a chart and study out the geography of a joke ? As someone has well said " The only one requiring such a definition is he who has no sense of humour, and therefore all the definitions in the world would f...

Publication Title: Prahran Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A QUESTION. [Newspaper Article] — Prahran Chronicle — 7 February 1914

A QUESTION. Mrs. Brown : 'Mrs. Jones has a very had habit I" Mr. Brown: "What is it, dear ?" Mrs. Brown: "She turns round and looks back every time we, pass on the street I" Mr. Brown : "How do you know she does ?" Never tell a girl that her dress is "simply ripping." It might give her a shock. 1831.

Publication Title: Prahran Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW A COW WAS BEWITCHED. THE "PINS AND THE TURF. [Newspaper Article] — Prahran Chronicle — 7 February 1914

HOW A COW WAS BEWITCHED. THE "PINS AND THE TURF. On calling recently at a shepherd's cottage in a southern county of Scotland the conversation turned on witchcraft and witching - stones; whereat the shepherd's wife, an old woman whose face beamed with in telligence and good humour, produced from the high mahogany chest of drawers-an essential piece of fur niture in the ' ben ' room of a Scot tich cottage-a number of small ro-nded pebbles long retained in the shepherd's family with no surviving record to account for their preser vation. In all probability they had been charm stones. On the discus sion of such a suggestion the good wife related the following story. Her mother, also the uife of a shepherd, had lived among the hills at the head of the valley of Et trick. One summer afternoon there came to her door an aged crone who begged a bowl of milk. As churning was in prospect, lambs to be fed, and, above all, milk scarce, the shepherd's wife expressed her sorrow that she could not...

Publication Title: Prahran Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WOMEN'S SHOES. VERY FEW SMALL SIZES ARE MADE OR WORN NOWADAYS. [Newspaper Article] — Prahran Chronicle — 7 February 1914

WOMEN'S SHOES. VERY FEW SMALL SIZES ARE MADE OR WORN NOWADAYS Even boot and shoe con. intions ccn?ribute .their horrage, to "' .Wo mun's Progress." Very" few smrall shoes are made or worn nowadays; so the records of manufacturers: say, and whereas 50 years ano 1th acer age measure ran from three to five, the normal size today is,. one number larger. The delicate "' two" that tripped so all lringly through the novels of the Duchess has be come a number not outworn, but outgrown. Athletics is blamed, or rather praised, for what has happened. A woman can tramp, play golf or ten nis. or even swim, far better if she wear a sizable shoe than if the toss point in the delicate and diminutive fashion prescribed by Godey's Ladies' Book, when the last century was young. Yes, undoubtedly woman's larger feet have carried her well along the upward path of success, but how about men ? Are they to have no credit for sensible foot expansion ? Consult "'A Century of Costame," and notice what elegant ...

Publication Title: Prahran Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Fatal Accident. [Newspaper Article] — Prahran Chronicle — 7 February 1914

Fatal Accident. Many residents of Prahran and St. Kilda will regret to learn of a sad fatal accident that befell Mr Edwin Geach, senr., at Sydney on Friday ; he was injured by a tram at Circular Quay, and died shortly after. For several years the deceased gentleman was in business as a draper and milliner in Melbourne, St. Kilda and Prahran. He was father of Mr Edwin Geach, theatrical en trepreneur ; Mr Franck Geach, solici   tor ; and Miss Portia Geach, artist. We desire to extend our sympathy to the family in their bereavement.

Publication Title: Prahran Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
EASILY PLEASED. [Newspaper Article] — Prahran Chronicle — 14 February 1914

EASILY PLEASED. "When I goes a-shopping," says an old lady, "I allers asks for what I wants, and if they have it, and it is cheal, and it's suitable. and I feel inclined to take it, and it can't be got at any place for less, I most allers take it without chaffering all day as most people do."

Publication Title: Prahran Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
INEFFECTIVE. [Newspaper Article] — Prahran Chronicle — 14 February 1914

INEFFECTIVfl2 - ,It , on't ,wortl as a nii ;'ones?e adly "What won't work_? ' as'edeiBrow: "Hvpnotism. Tried ict-ont the ut. clier; looked- a hi'? hi`edlunitil I had his unmdivided 'tteni??ion theni I said, slowly, That bill-": has been paid.' " 'What did: the butcher do ?" "'He said, You're a liar !' "

Publication Title: Prahran Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A FIGHT FOR FREEDOM. AND HOW IT ENDED. [Newspaper Article] — Prahran Chronicle — 14 February 1914

A FIGHT FOR FREEDO M - " -+--- ' " AND HOW IT ENDED. . The love of -freedom is ingrained in the breasts of all' .aimal life, :par ticularly the types that have never been domesticated. In a fascinating paper, M. Millot tells of some re markable instances, of -rcsistarice -to captivity in such -reatures,' ani' th-i wiles attempted i o secure thceir end. iA tint harvest mouse .was, for -in stance, incarcerated in -thl deptlis oi a glass .bottle,:and lthe :ingenious --de vice whereby the- little: prisoner suc ceeded, in breaking its -confinement forms quite- a romautic story.. The harvest mouse/is one of the sniallest jnd inmot delicately giaceifl rof ' all liiing- maimmals, and it is. o .lisht that it .can ascend and de~ our ain ear of corn, withoiit ,,bending: i ~ .tstalk. Its agile movemnients are assisted by a surprisingly prehensile tail .' l.he litile 'creature .`in- A? Miliot's'caie ias" tended as devotedly anid niiade iis comfortable -in itsi glass iprison as hiuman care -dould...

Publication Title: Prahran Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ROYALTY AT THE THEATRE. [Newspaper Article] — Prahran Chronicle — 14 February 1914

ROYALTY AT THE THEATRE. The etiquette attending a Royal vhit to a theatre is not so elabo rate as it was in the earlier days. Royalty likes to go to the play with as little fuss and commotion as pos sible nowadays. Queen Victoria, in her youth, went frequently to the theatre-was con sidered quite a playgoer, in fact but after the death of the Prince Consort she seldo-1 attended a public performance. King Edward was a theatregoer right up tbo the-last.. The present K'in- and Queen go only to see. those pieces w?hich `they deem worthy of Royal notice The majority of peonle ?imi gine that' Royalty does not pay for its seats; but this is a pure delusion. for when the King or Queen arrange to visit a theatre, notice to that effect' is sent to thie firm ?\ho' do t?e Rpal theatrical commissions. Before ordering a box 'at a thea tre-for Royalty rarely sits anywhere: else-some official from the Royai household is sent on behalf of their Majesties . to report that? the pla is in every way fit...

Publication Title: Prahran Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
KING'S ENGLISH. [Newspaper Article] — Prahran Chronicle — 14 February 1914

KING'S ENGLISH. " When the native banker in TniFa, who! boasted a smatter.niv of In lilh, duscribed himself over h's d(or as a : European loafer," he wcn lered greatly what the lBri'sh re, i hnts in those .parts coul lfind in it to laugh at.

Publication Title: Prahran Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE LARGEST ROOM. [Newspaper Article] — Prahran Chronicle — 14 February 1914

THE LARGEST ROOM. A gentleman seeing an advertise merient in the paper, "A five-roomed house to let," went to have a look at. it.. It was just the size he wanted, but was sadly out of repair. He went to the agent's office. and said he didn't want a six-roomed house. "That isn't a six-roomed house," said the agent. "Oh, yes it is." "But I say it is not.' ' n-] the agent began co:mtin : "'There's the kitchen, the daining-room. recaption room, and two bedrooms-that's five, isn't it ?" ~'?Yes ; but there's the room . for improvement," said the prospective `tenant," and that's bigger than any ,df the others."

Publication Title: Prahran Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Victoria's New Governor. SIR ARTHUR LYULPH STANLEY. RECEPTION ARRANGEMENTS. [Newspaper Article] — Prahran Chronicle — 14 February 1914

Victoria's New Governor. SIR ARTHUR LYULPH STANLEY. RECEPTION ARRANGE MENTS. Arrangements have been ccm p!eted for the official landing at St. Kilda on Monday, February 23rd, of the new Governor of Victoria, Sir Arthur Lyulph Stanley, and Lady Stanley. They are to arrive by the R.M S. Osterley, reaching a point oft Gellibrand lighthouse about 9 a.m,, where they will be transhipped to the H.M.A.S. Melbourne. The Melbourne will then go down the bay to about eight miles beyond the St. Kilda pier, and there await the arrival of the Hygeia at 1.20 p m. The Premier and reception com mittee of the Cabinet, with Ministers and members of both Houses and their wives will go on board the Hygeia at Port Melbourne, and pro ceed down the bay to meet the Melbourne. Luncheon will be served on board the Hygeia. From the Melbourne the Governor Designate and party will tranship to the Hygeia, which will steam to the St. Kilda pier. The official landing is timed to take place at 2.15 p.m. The St. Kilda...

Publication Title: Prahran Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
POLAR COLD AND WINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Prahran Chronicle — 14 February 1914

POLAR COLD AND WINGS. During the Polar expedition of the" 'Belgtica,' Captain Gulache noticed that many of the insects were with-? out wings. It had been remarked` before that certain Alpine species had wings more or less atro hied. To find out whether the cold- had anything to do with thi, Priofi I)ewitz, of the University of id[letz? placed some wasp nests :-for. 48 hours in an ice box,, and was re-i warded by seeing some of the in- sects emerge without wings. He did the same with the larvae - of flies, keeping them two monl hs at a tem perature just above freezing, and most of the flies that developed had de fective wings.

Publication Title: Prahran Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Motor Bus Traffic and the Roads. PROBABLE ACTION BY COUNCILS. [Newspaper Article] — Prahran Chronicle — 14 February 1914

Motor Bus Traffic and the Roads. PROBABLE ACTION BY COUNCILS. At its last meeting the St. Kilda Council passed a resolution that the Melbourne City Council be asked to convene a conference of representa tives of metropolitan municipalities to consider the question of the damage caused to the roads by the great number of motor omnibuses now plying for hire. The motion was brought forward by Cr Gibbs, who expressed much concern at the destruction being wrought to the St. Kilda roads owing the large amount of omnibus traffic which they now had to contend with. Other muni cipalities are evincing a strong desire to support the movement initiated by St. Kilda. The question that wi:l have to be considered is to how and to what extent the proprietors of motor buses were to be called upon to pay for the repair and upkeep of the roads. In making reference to the subject the Lord Mayor of Melbourne said there was no doubt that some action would have to be taken to enable the roads to be kept i...

Publication Title: Prahran Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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