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Title: Western Age Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 52,784 items from Western Age, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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AMERICA'S PRESS. WAR-RIDDEN JOURNALISM. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 5 December 1914

AMERICA'S PRESS. WAR-RIDDEN JOURNALISM. 'A big European war will be a line thing for - the newspapers.' remarked a big busi ness man In Philadelphia tho other day. Probably a gocM many other people who have seen wild-eyed newsboys selling copy after copy of thu latest extra in no time at all' are of the same opinion. With ektras coming out several times a day, and nearly overyono buying tliem morning, noon, and night, one would think that war would be a big daily's favorite form ot international pastime. The contrary Is true, however, as a contributor of the Philadelphia Public Led ger explained to tho misinformed business man: — Alas! Others may seo your ointment, but you alone can- observo the fly swimming around In It. The ink is scarcely dry upon tho printed testimony of ono nowspaper manager' to tho effect that the Spanish American War had cost his publication a tidy three-quarters of a million net. The editor of the London Post told mo Ills paper hail twenty correspondents In ...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
UNDER THE CENSOR. LO, THE POOR CORRESPONDENT [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 5 December 1914

UNDER THE CENSOR. LO, THE POOR CORRESPONDENT! Doubtless, if one but knew, the fevered dally newspapers deserve as much sympathy as blame in their present attempt to report the war for a bloodthirsty nation of peace lovers. Let them -take heart, however, for one of their brethren, on the New York Evening Post, has taken pity on them. He has constructed for them a cast-iron, in destructible, hammerless, incontrovertible cable despatch, such as may be used time and again, with varying head-lines, and such as will satisfy all readers. Including all foreign born, including the GermanAmeri cans:— Paris, or Brussels, or Berlin (as the case may be).— Another notable victory over the enemy was scored by a French (or Belgian, or German) infantry , regiment at a point somewhere between Iceland and Sicily. Our troops were outnumbered four to one. but our guns carried four times as far as the enemy's artillery and fired four times as fast. They retired with a loss of six thousand men. Our own lo...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BELGIAN MOTHER'S LETTER. PROTEST TO GERMAN EMPRESS. "SOLDIERS, NOT ASSASSINS." [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 5 December 1914

BELGIAN MOTHER'S LETTER. PROTEST TO GERMAN EMPRESS. 'SOLDIERS, NOT ASSASSINS.' The full text of a poignant letter addressed by the mother of a wounded Belgian .soldier lo the German Empress Is given in the Lon don press. It runs as follows; — k 'Madame, 1 read in the newspapers Xhal your son Joachim has returned to Berlin wounded, that you went out to meet 'Jm» and . . that yvu regarded with pride the iron Cross pinned on his breast. I also, mudatnc, have a son at the war. lie wa» wounded, as yours was. But he has not been brought back to me. I have not been able to i.tm t km-* Avon xnent three weeks praying to God for him. not knowing I whether he lives. He. has not fought, thank j God, under tho same colors as your son. But, I as wife and mother, I can understand tho Joy you must have felt at seeing your son ngnln alive. 'I feel no bitterness against your soldiers for having wounded my son on the battle field. It Is tho fortune of war, hut I re lied that It is in my poor Belgium t...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GERMAN FABLES. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 5 December 1914

GERMAN FABLES. The stories (old In the German newspapers 01 .,thev. womk-rful thlI)g8 Gcrraan}. |;u^Iltla to do before the war is over ought to Instil confidence !n thu most weak-kneed citizens of the Fatherland. Not content with castlnc .'Oin. suns with which to defy the British fleet when German troops are being trans ported across the Channel for the invasion of Englund, Uermany is also arranging for the destruction of the British fleet on the North Sea without risking a siuglo German warship. A German paper reports that every night a Zeppelin leaves its hangar at Friedrlcks hafen, on the German shore of Lake Con stance, and after rising to a height of about 1000ft. drops on the waters of the lake, 'with great rapidity and precision,' about 60 bas ket-shaped missiles, which contain torpedoes. A terrific explosion follows, and a great column of water is thrown into the air. These vessels are practising for tho destruc tion of tho vossels of the British fleet. But why the Zeppelins...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO EUROPE. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 5 December 1914

TO EUROPE. — ? +* I. Beat back f.iy forfeit ploughshares into swords, It Is not yet the far, seraphic Dream 1 Of peace made beautiful and love supreme. For now the strong, unwearable chords Of battle shako to thunder, aud the hordes Advance, where now the circling vultures scream. The standards gather and the trumpets gleam; Down the long hillside stare the mounted lord*. Now far beyond the tumult and the hate Thu white-clad nurses and the surgeons wait I The backward currents of tormented life. | When on the waiting silences shall come I The screams of men, and. ere those lips are dumb, The uearching probe, the ligature and knife. II. Was it lor such, the brutehood and the pain, Civilisation gave her holy fire Unto thv wardshln. and the nnowv miiIta Of her august and most exalted fane? Are these the harvests of lier ancient rain Men glean at evening In the scarlet mire, Or wherfe the mountain smokes, a dreadful pyrt. Or where the warshlpvdrags a bloody stain? Are these thy votive l...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ALBERT OF BELGIUM. EUROPE'S HANDSOMEST KING. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 5 December 1914

ALBERT OF BELGIUM. EUROPE'S HANDSOMEST KINO. Horum omnium fortlsslml Bclgae sunt, uroto the gront military expert Caius Julius Caesar twenty centuries ago, and we are learning to-day that hlo appraisal of that little country's temper was not far wrong* Attention focuses, however, upon their leader* the young King Albert, whose full name reaches the astonishing length of Albert Leo pold Clement Maria Meinrad. He Is said to be the handsomest monarch In Kurope, and to be possessed of an Intelligence fully equal to the promise of his appearance. He is un doubtedly the prototype of the 'King Egbert** who figures strikingly in the last half of H. G. Wells's The World Set Free, who is a 'king awake,' and who is made to say: 'For the first time in my life I am going to be a king. . . I am going to bo a renl king, and I am going to abolish, dispose of. finish, the crown to which I havo been a slave.' Thus noes 'the young King of the most venorabl* kingdom in Europe' attest, in fiction, his d...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A JACKY FISHER STORY. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 5 December 1914

A JACKY FISHER STORY. Lord Fisher, tlio First Lord of the Ad miralty, relates an amusing experience he had ono inspection day. Somehow he got separated from Ills of ficial frienUs, and at last lost his way. He wandered about, and eventually came upon a workman gently hammering a piece of Iron outside ono of tho workshops. 'Are the Lords of the Admiralty about here?' asked Sir John. 'No fear, matey.' said the man, who did not Know nis raincr carelessly-dressed In quisitor. 'I'm here doln' crow for 'cm!' 'Crow! What's that?' 'What, don't yer know? Inside this 'ere shed my mates Is a-takln' of It easy. When I sees someone that don't matter, I knocks soft, like now. But when I sees old Jacky Fisher, I knocks like blades; and when old Jacky pokes his nose insltle, they're workln' like blazes, too! See?' Jacky Fisher did see, and crow-shooting was begun in the dockyard that day.

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
REFUSED TO BE RESCUED. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 5 December 1914

REFUSED TO BE RESCUED. 'As we understand tbo theory of the holy war, tho Kaiser had a divine mission to rescue England, France, and Belgium from the Impending menace of Slav domination,' says the New York Times. 'They were pig headed about it, and refused to be rescued. So, with u heavy heart, the Kaiser was com pelled to thrash them In order to save them.' The Albany Herald says one baby is bori. In Germany every sixteen seconds. He must find it very tiresome. Policemen are stationed in l)w KiiKlish Church at Dresden to prevent prayer for the success of the Allies. ,

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BOYCOTTING WAGNER. ANTI-GERMAN FEELING. ARGUMENTS ON BOTH SIDES. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 5 December 1914

BOYCOTTING WAGNER. ANTI-GERMAN FEELING. ARGUMENTS ON BOTH SIDES. The temporary boycott of Wagner and other Herman composers at the famous Queen's Hall promenade concerts, London, I was one manifestation of war-timo feeling I that evoked a prompt protest in the English press. It seems that a week after war was declared a pivre by Strauss was replaced on tho programme of the first promenade con cert of the season by something of Tschat kowsky's; the customary Wagner concert was replaced the next day by a French and Russian programme; and it was announced that the names of no living German or Aus trian composers would appear on the futuro programmes. In explanation of this course tho management stated that 'the patriotic feelings of the enormous audience' had to be considered, and that any German music might provoke demonstrations embarrassing to the police. But it seems that tho man agement did Its audience an injustice. 'It Is a worthy tribute to the broad minded and tolerant view of...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHERE THE BOYS ARE BURIED. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 5 December 1914

WHERE THE BOYS ARE BURIED. Mr. G. H. l'errls gives a moving picture of where some of the boys are buried who have gone down to death in this great war. There will bo many such nameless graves. Mr. l'erris went to the Frenoh village of I'ez arches, had a talk with the mayor, M. Couple, and writes thus in tho Chronicle: — 'I asked whether the losses were serious. ' 'The Germans seemed to suffer greatly here/ replied our friend, the mayor; 'they had many wounded. But the English were well covered; they lost only two killed and thirty wounded. They buried the two bodies over there on tho border of the wood; if you will come I will show you the place.' 'I shall not forget that tiny grave amid the fields of tho Brie plateau. No stone marks the place where two sons of England, someone's beloved, rest after their labor and sacrifice. There Is nothing but a pile of brown earth In the bottom of a small chalk pit, surmounted by a couple of brown sticks tied together with string to make a rough...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DUM-DUM BULLETS. THEIR TERRIBLE WOUNDS. FRANCE AND GERMANY SIGNED TO BAR THEM. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 5 December 1914

DUM-DUM BULLETS. THEIR TERRIBLE WOUNDS. fRANOE AND GERMANY SIGNED TO BAR THEM. The dum-dum bullet and the peculiar wound mado by it were described for the Now York World by Surgeon C. C. Pierce» of the Public Health and Marino Hospital Ser vice. Incidentally lie snld: 'Among tb i signers a few yean ago of the Hague agreement against the use of dum-dum bullets were France and Germany. The United States and England withheld their votes on the sub ject ORIGINATED IN INDIA. 'The word dum-dum,' said Dr. Pierce, 'or- iginated in India during ^one of the native uprisings ngainst British rule In the middle Hart of tho last century. Dum Duni, In dia, was the place where these bullets were first manufactured, and at that time there was at least a logical excuse for their use. In their battles with the ilorce fanatical tribesmen of India the British found the or dinary bullet Inadequate to stop their charges. Tho leader of the tribesmen would excite their fighters to frenzy and then hurl them ...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE INDIAN SIGN. MUCH-CONQUERED AUSTRIA. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 5 December 1914

THE INDIAN SIGN. MUCH- CONQUERED AUSTRIA. The Kmpcmr Francis Joseph «»f Austria was born on August IS. 1830, and the Trl huna (Rome) celebrates this anniversary by recapitulating the perpetual defeats which Austrian armies have suffered In war. This record Is looked upon by such papers as the Trlbuna as rather an 111 omen for Kalsor Wilhelm and his forces. The following Is -?iven by Italy's government organ as a list ?if the unfortunate battles In which the fiag if Austria went down: 1A1S-164S (The Thirty Years' War). — Aus- tria was defeated by Gustavus Adolphus at Leipzig in 1031; at Lutzen In 1632. Pom ?rauia was occupied by the enemy and the Austrians finally beaten by the l-rench and forced to sue for peace. 16S3. In this year the Austrians were defeated by the Turks, and the Emperoi Leopold fled from Vienna and sought the as sistance of John Sobleski of Poland, and the allies then put to lllght the Turks, who had gathered round the walls of Vienna. 1707-1710.— This was the war...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A LITTLE BELGIAN. JULIE VERGISON, OF NORTH SYDNEY. FOUR UNCLES IN THE WAR. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 5 December 1914

A LITTLE BELGIAN. JULIE VERGISON, OF NORTH SYDNEY. FOUR UNCLES IN THE WAR. Good fortune in the strange, disguise of 1U hciilth visited the family of Julie Vergluoti, a little Belgian girl, who, three years ago, left. Antwerp with her parents, because her mother was not .strong enough to stand an other European winter. The Verglson family tame to Australia, and now live in North Svdnev. Julie speaks English perfectly, but her inothVr still clings to Flemish, and has to get her daughter to translate any conversa tion with Australians. JuUe Verglson was onlv ten when she left Belgium, but when asked If she has yet forgotten what h*r own land was like, she shrugs her shoulders and, with reproachful Immwii eyes, asks: 'How could I:' Life for the Belgian child Is very utile different from tliat «»f the Australian, only that, perhaps, in consequence of the more bracing climate, si hool hours are longer. The State school opens at S.3U. and. with a r« cess for the younger children ut 11.30 a...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GERMANY REVEALS HERSELF. CONSEQUENCES OF DEFEAT. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 5 December 1914

GERMANY REVEALS HERSELF. CONSEQUENCES OF DEFEAT. Sir Harry Johnston him for many years been of tho number of those who havo striven to encourage u friendly understanding be tween Britain and Germany. In tho Sep tember Nineteenth Century and After, ho frankly acknowledges that the task tliey had set before themselves was hopeless, becauso of the sinister designs of the German ruling classes. Tho despatches contained in tint Foreign Office White Book proved to lilin that the British Cnliinet and British Am bassadors woro better Informed than thi- nm C.ermans ns lo Germany's real Intentions, mid the Impossibility of sinking German thirst for power by reasonable concessions. He now recognises that modern Germany, stimulated by Its Kmperor. and egged on by tile Olym pian pride of 1'russla, has associated Itself with well-nigh immeasurable ambitions. 'In these epoch-making despatches Germany,' lie confesses, 'proclaims her Intention (o be the dominant Power of tin- Old World. West ern and...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GERMAN WAR THEORIES. THREE THAT WERE CORRECT. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 5 December 1914

GERMAN WAR THEORIES. ♦ J THREE THAT WERE CORRECT. The outstanding fact that the progress of the Wiir has revealed Is the success of cer tain peculiarly German theories, now that thoy have been put to the test of practice. It Is Important for us, however, to measure the exact amount of that success and not. to exaggerate it. Among the theories charac teristically German and propounded without actual warfare to prove or disprove thorn during the last generation were In particu lar three theoriea:— First— That modern fortilleatlons would fall at once to a combination of heavy bombard ment by siege artillery and determined rushes thrown upon it at great expense of ,'ife by Infantry of the enemy. Second — That men, very slightly trained or even untrained, could be Incorporated Into nnd digested by a trained force In large pro portions and rapidly during the course of a campaign. Third — That attacks In masses and in fair ly close formation would be carried out with all tho advantage of w...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE PACIFIC STATE. H. G. WELLS OUTSPOKEN. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 5 December 1914

THE PACIFIC STATE. H. G. WELLS OUTSPOKEN. 'Hitherto the peculiar ni.-.nil'est weakness of the liberal, tlio democratic, the pacitlc ?Statu huve repelled great numbers of ener getic and generous spirits who would other wise have served it,' writes Mr. H. G. Wells ir. tho Nation. 'llow many Americans, wearied by an at mosphere of scandalous business unfairness, iicisy and mischievous newspapers, and social confusion, huve not turned at times with a certuin envy to the smooth-working, silent German State machine, and longed to ex change many evils for a condition of things in which only the whole is evil? 'There is no disputing tho superior omo tiouul and pictorial appeal of strong men armed and embnttled over able men who are merely busy. It needs a llnely developed in telligence' to see that Professor William James was a very much greater man, and in reality a more effective man, than the present Emperor William. '.'Nevertheless, it is possible to believe that in the end the puclllc ...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW THE WOMEN WAITED. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 5 December 1914

HOW THE WOMEN WAITED. 'The country iu siskins men to le«v«» their work and prepare to man the - trenches in Knmco or Belgium in the name of the high est obligation that a citizen can recognise: it demands a man's life from him in war, and then fiings his widow a beggarly pen sion of live shillings a week, and tells hor to go and beg at the door of some charitable agency for a living,' says the Nation, dis cussing, the problem of paying the saviors of an iSmplre. 'We do not believe that anybody could read without shame the description of tho Manchester Guardian of the treatment of the soldiers' wives who are seeking to be put on the register for allowances. 'Although the need for immediate improvement of the machinery was apparent days ago, the sccnu in the afUrnoon outside this office was in tolerable to anyone who thought of the things which the husbands and sons of many of the applicants might soon be enduring on the battlefield. ' 'At half-past three there were more than 1!00 wom...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Family Notices [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 5 December 1914

In Memoriam.   ATTWATER.—In loving memory of     our dearly beloved husband and father. No tongue can tell, no words can say, How much we miss you day by day.   So good and kind while on this earth. We miss you most who know your worth. We remember well our sorrow As we stood beside your bed, And the deep and heartfelt anguish When we knew that you were dead. Inserted by his sorrowing wife and daughter, Nellie and Sallie. ELLIOTT.—At Cobar, accidentally     drowned Cobar Gold Mines Tank, 4th December, 1908, Henry Ed- ward (Harry), dearly loved son of C. W. and E. M. Elliott, aged 16 years 11 months.   So dearly loved, so sadly missed. The Western Age.   SATURDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1914.

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Wedding. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 5 December 1914

Wedding. A pretty wedding was celebrated at 6 o'clock on Thursday morning, at St. Paul's Church of England, Cobar, by Ven. Archdeacon F. E. Haviland, the contracting parties being Miss ' Birdie,' eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Scott, of Brough-street, and Mr. Leslie Incher, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. W. Incher, of Narran- dera. The bride, who was given away by her father, wore a becoming gown of silk crepe-de-chene, with a square train, mob cap and veil. She wore a diamond bangle, and carried a bouquet of white roses and carna- tions, the gift of the bridegroom. Miss Ethel Scott (sister of the bride) and Miss Ethel Incher (sister of the bridegroom) were the bridesmaids, and wore gowns of blue silk, trimmed with shadow lace, and a Dolly Var- den hat with pink roses, and mob cap, respectively. They carried bou- quets of pink rosos, and Miss Scott wore a gold bracelet watch, and Miss Incher a gold bangle, gifts of the bridegroom. Mr. Dave Scott, jun. (brother of the bride) was b...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FATHER'S CONTRIBUTION. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 9 December 1914

FATHEE'S OONTBIBUTION. Thero had been a missionary sermon and collection at a certain church, and a littlo girl, who had accompanied her father to the service, seemed perplexed and meditative. When she reached homo she asked nur m.ocnpr .wnotner tno natives or. Africa' of'A whom they had heard woro no clothes. 'No,' replied her mother, 'they jlon't.' * ''Then,'' 'said tho obsorvant. child, 'what was thp use of tho button that fathor put on tho platof '

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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