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Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 428 items from Australian Producer's Home Journal, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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BACTERIA. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 22 November 1910

1U-TBU1A. 1. The bacteria which fix the at mospheric nitrogen, require for their growth and development, air. light. wnimih, and moisture, and for their nomishmei t vegetable matter yielding j carbonic acid. i 2. It is. therefore, necessary to i nernto the soil by tillage, so as to j give free access to the air. light, and moist urc, and to bring It into a fav ourable condition to retain moisture. ! .'-. The beneficial action of the nit ri- j rying bacteria takes place only in i the layers of soil to a depth whore j air. lL'ht. mid warmth i»enetrato eas- j My and abundantly. Such soil may 1k» i '?ailed 'mellow.' At a greater depth. I to which the air penetrates with more ! ditliculty. another species of bacteria | of an unfavourable character comes ; into activity, viz.. those which iv- | transform the available nitrogen into i inert cnmiiiiiaiions. j 4. Therefore the soil should not be '? turned up beyond n limited depth, which, according to my experience, Bhould not exceed six inc...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BITS OF MIRTH AND WISDOM. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 22 November 1910

KITS OF MIUTII AND WISDOM. Woman — she needs no eulogy; she speaks for herself: ? ? * ? * The world without woman would be as a blank i/iece of paper — unruled I ? ? a lie who courts nnd goes away Will live to ciuirt. another day; Hut he who weds and courts still May get in court against his will I » ? ? The world was sad, the garden wild, and man a hermit sigliul, till woinau smiled. — Scott. ? ? * Man wants but little here below, He's not so bard to please; But woman (bless lier little heart) Wants everything she sees. Printed and published by S. A. SAWELL for and on behalf of -THE AUSTRALIAN PRODUCERS* HOME JOURNAL.' issued at the oaice of TUB STOCK JOURNAL NRWSPAPKR CO., LTD., 17 Uastle iHji«h-street, Sydney, N.S.W., Australia.

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SOILS FOR LUCERNE. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 22 November 1910

SOILS FOR LUCERNE. Considerable doubt appears to exist regarding t lit? best soils and most suitable conditions for the miecessful growth of lucerne. Here is an American agricultural expert's views: — 'It is more difficult to grow lucerne ou some soils tliau others, and ou some of them it is not wise to make the attempt. First, any soil that is not luoretlmu 2Ut. nbove the water line is too shallow for con tinual lucerne growth. It needs -i depth of at least 3ft to water, and if the distance is even greater all the better. la laying tile uuder drains for a foundation to a lucerne field, seek to got the level of the water-line flown at least .'! ft. or -I fr. On peaty soils with little day | or sound earth within them it is not often that lucerne will thrive?. Ther,.« I are some exceptions to this rule, though they are uot well understood. On nearly barren sands it is doubt ful if it is worth while frying to establish lucerne lields. They must be continually fed. and it must be remem...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 22 November 1910

Hp''- . '-^JjT \ 'The Stock and Station l| ; ; ' ' f eaff's S®bscfflptl©e in i BE| 1 The Pnper itself is well worth the j ?HfLu-!;. f J (subscription without any premium, j Hf^LV ?« but we want to greatly enlarge our | Bp~T . ( wt circulation; that is why we are K( , , . ' g| making this unprecedented offer. . | ?Hfeyt . ~ ' ?*'' ] By ALFRED KAWKESWORTH (Lecturer HBBfc \ ' , ' ' in-Cbarge of Sheep and Wool, Technical HRES''* ^ - , -^ College, Sydney) K-r ? *~ * ? / \ * M Published at $$1™ Post Free ; ?fc-;t '' * * ' '?'^^^'^ is the only text-book on the subject publislied in ?B^'1^1*'. \ * J***^*^ Australia. Its being the only text-book is not ?»*£*??' ° ' . S^ its sole recommendation. It is THE text-book. BP|^ ' ° ^- 10,000 copies have been sold at 'Si-, and we VBHHg& - -' -^' are now ottering it to you on payment of a lirst ^j^mK^f/--^i^' year's subscription, 12 0. The 'Stock and Station Journat.'1 is published every Tuesday and Friday, and deals with and advocates everyth...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GIRDLING FRUIT TREES. AN AMERICAN EXPERIMENT. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 22 November 1910

GIRDLING FKUIT TUKES. ? i AN AMEIUCAN KXPERIMENT. The cincturing of currant vines lins been a practice of Australian grow ers, who found the cutting of a riiiK, or 'ringing' the vine with a wire, tended to improve the yield. An American experimenter has tried the process on stone fruit trees, and lie writes: — 'Last winter l giruicu iimu3 on several apricot, plum, and pencil I trees, and in the case of Abert § Dewey and Klberta, with market sue- | cess. Except a few scattered | peaches, the only crop borne on tliost* | varieties was on t lie girdled limbs, I a cold snap having caused the fruit j to shed. The Dewey peaches were-, j not only about ns large as ordinary I Klberta, hut ripened about fen days j before tQie few others that remained on the trees. The girdled Klberta j limb was loaded with line fruit, larg- j cr iu size than the average;, while | there were only three poaches on j the uiiKii-dlnl limbs. 'The experiment was not ho fav ourable on plums and apricots, tho ! tree...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 22 November 1910

^\! PADE 25/-ADaj ^'jCT Balling this lO-pleoa Harnosr Hit ' ,J'/ Thin la tho BtaUmsnt of one of -ja i-lfcag:ar*niiiiSr^;^AihafflilL ' ? N.S.W.

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE INVOLUTION OF BREEDS. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 22 November 1910

THE EVOLUTION OF BHF.KDN. Before written history, our fore fathers had domesticated birds inr useful purposes. No one can therefore give a correct account of what were tho originals; but I think it will ho interesting to trace our domestic fowls .from their wild origin of one or two varieties down to the hun dteds of varieties of to-day. The wild fowls that lived thousands of years ago, and from which our dom estic raee.s have been evolved, are found still wild in the southern countries of Asia. This has been demonstrated by the successful cross ing of these wild varieties with the domestic fowl of to-day. There are several varieties mentioned by nat uralists as having been responsible for the origin of our domestic hen, viz., the U a 111 us Bakiva, .Stanlelii, Ronneratti, Furcatus and Giganteus, but the consensus of opinion points to the Baukiva and the (ii'ganteus as chief progenitors. There is no doubt that natural evolution had much to do with the varying (if type and color befo...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FARMYARD MANURE. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 22 November 1910

FARMYARD MANURE. Present-day conditions of agricul ture render it more than over neces sary that every agriculturist should consider his position with regard to the use of manure. A great deal de pends upon the conditions under which the farmyard manure is made, and this is of the utmost importance. If the miiuurc has been allowed to remain in the open yard (luring si rainy season, and thus been subjected to a great deaf of washing, or, if its main compouent is rotten straw, trodden in by poorly-f^l cattle, it is of little value, and the only benefit which is likely to airruc from such stutT is more in the way of lighten ing a heavy soil — that is. a mechani cal effect— than as a source of plant food, ii ud \«hat its value must be under such circumstances is rather difficult to estimate. Farmyard man ure contains all the constituents ne cessary to form plant food, and its effects when applied to the land are far more lasting than in the case of artificials. The question arises as to...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 22 November 1910

In NAME and in FACT ~~ ^CoM,* . ^^Jg£~,'' § I A GREAT FEATURE |; THE WHEELS, at once the most important and the S: Best feature in our make. Steel Spokes hydraulically ;*. forced into countersinks in tyre, therefore cannot work I loose. TYRES never need cutting. RENEWABLE | WEARING PARTS to Wheels and Axles make them .i:.l everlasting. Oiling is done without removal of wheels. LOW-BUILT. j LIOHT BUMIH6.. PERMANEHTLY DURABLE MAIN FRAME and TOP of Spring Steel and Hard wood, powerful and splendidly braced. LOTS OF GOOD POINTS. (MENTION THIS ADVERTISEMENT.) I [?]

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Factors of the Farm Continued from page 9. APPLE STORAGE. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 22 November 1910

Factors of the Farm I Continued from past 0. B APPLE STORAGE. Mr. F. A. .loynor, of Adelaido, who is an enthusiastic horticulturist, has carried out successfully the storago of apples. He simply took advantage of the space under his dweliing-houKe which is built on fairly high piles, and fitted this up with shelves, into which flat boxes aro lodged nft«r the manner -.if crude drawers, each box holding a little- more than a bushel, with the apples two or throo deep. The battens forming the bottoms of the boxes are slightly spaced apart, and this permits the circulation of air, and also effects an economy in material. This gentleman remarks that after fivo years' experience ho is quite satisfied that this method is superior to piling the apj.les in heaps. Ibis year ho stored about 200 bus hols in heaps on the ii'loor, and the waste from these was at least four times greater than from those stored in the trays. The fruit is gathered into lined baskets, and graded direct ly into the tra...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
IMPROVING SANDY SOILS BY GOOD CROP CULTURE. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 22 November 1910

IMPROVING SANDY SOILS BY GOOD CROP CULTURE. The improvment of worn-out sandy soils, and tho study df the best meth ods of increasing tho humus and gen eral fertility of such soils, i3 the sub ject of investigation by tbe soils de partment of the Collogo of Agrioul ture of the University of Wiscon sin. At Sparta. Monroe countv (writes 'Hoard's Dairyman') a worn out sandy farm, whicli was so poor that practically nothing could be grown on it, is under cultivation, tho effort being to increaso tbe nitrogen and humus supply. This field has bean leached and cropped out for 40 years until its water-holding capacity is very low. Clover cannot be grown upon this soil without npc-cial treatment, since it is very acid. Ground lirnestono and air-slacked lime havo been ap plied at tho rate of 1000 to 201 X) j-ounds por acr.), and fair stand.) of olover have been securod. Testa havo been made of the effects of duop and shallow seeding; the use of different kinds and combinations of commercial (f...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DOMESTIC ECONOMY. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 22 November 1910

DOMESTIC ECON'OMY. 'Hey, mon '.' exclaimed the brnw, l-onnio North fy-iiutry man, 'thrift is a wunncrfui tiling !' 'Yes,' replied his English trvivel ling L'OtniiauiiHi ; 'you're right thenr. Now, I g.ivo my wifo ;i £10 noto f.'» manage Chri.Hl.m.'is on, nnd — wouM you believe it- — in.sto;id of «xceedm-4 it, she savcl nearly a sovereign -int of it to buy herstjlf a luit!' 'That's noivt.' replied tho Soi'tcb man. 'My wife givtxst the kids ha' pennies apmrc tn go to bed suponr less; when they're asleep .--.he t:i--~'M tho ha'-priiiniu-s off on 'em ugtw^in, and then she makes 'em -l- v/i'.i'it ony breakf.xst for ln.sin' eui ! 15.!/, mon, that's thrift I'

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 22 November 1910

1; 'T'HIS c.iso contains all tin: appliiiiiri-s iiprussary to dress wounds or relieve | i pain therefrom. In the event uf neeident, when a physician is nut at, j }} linnd, directions as to how to aut and how to uso the contents will l-o found g £ in tlio instructions printed on tho sides and ends of tho c.ise and inside uf ^ P cover. The articles are contained in a handsomely-decorated hinged lid 1 | metal box. ? jj I DETAILS OF CONTENTS: | i One rubber bandage, i2i5 antiseptic tablets, loz. absorbent cotton, » I 1 oz. styptic eottoii. 1 doz, antiseptic compresses, 1 o/.. absoi -limit | I lint, 1 oz. bnrated vaseline, 1 spool adhesive plaster, 1 hox 1 I isinglass, J do/., cotton roller blindages (1 inch), I do/., ditto I I (2 ineli), i do/.. {'.i iin-h), 1 oz. liquid ammonia, 1 oz. hi-carb. soda, i | i package of pins, $ doz. safety pins, 1 pair scissors. |J | Rkadv kor tiik StMMiicoX: 1 card silk ligature, 1 bottle H |i catgut ligature, .'5 surgeons' needles, 1 pair forceps. I % A ...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BEES ON THE FARM. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 22 November 1910

BKMS ON THE FARM. There are values In the bee on the farm, and though in this coun try there does, not appear to be any record of the quantity of honey pro duced annually, it. is safe to say, in an off-hand way, we are not pro ducing as much as we should be. l''or, according to the figures, al most every country is an importer of honey, and therefore this country could be, jf it were in a position to deliver the goods, an exporter, receiving gold coin for the yellow ?product of the little busy bee. In the United Stales there are produced and consumed annually over £4,000, 000 worth of honey, and beeswax to the value of £400,000 was produced and used in the States last year. Also, there were imported, addition al to this great quantity, 12,000,000 lb. of honey and o0,000 tons of bees wax. There is no country in the world as well equipped for the pro duction of honey as our own, and if the business of the beekeeper were extended to tlhe farms there would be added profits to be handled...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE FARMYARD. PROFITABLE AND UNPROFITABLE HENS. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 22 November 1910

^-^oooo THE FARMYARD, ooooooj M t imiii ? ( i PROFITABLE AND TJNL'ROFIT AUI.W URNS. 1 rl'l-e results of nn experiment in j egg production, carried out by the Aberdeen and North of Scotland ] College of Agriculture are of great j import ance, not- so much in proving 1 lit; great egg-laying capability of cor 1,-iin breeds or poultry^as in proving that the. regi.sl ration of every hen's performance is as essential to the greatest profitableness us is Hie re gistration of each cow's milk. ''it is pretty generally known that .thousands of cows which do not pay expenses are .kept year after year its milkers, whereas all that do not produce a fair quantity of milk ought to be weeded out, and fatten ed 1'or the butcher. it A Hock of unselected hens may pay : expenses, and yield n small profit, -but only selected layers can pay well where the -jule of eggs is the main : consideration. Even if chicken-rearing i be this chief consideration, there are i! eggs to be sold when a hen is not |j sit...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE CAUSE OF SOFT BUTTER. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 22 November 1910

THE CAUSE 01' SOFT BUTTKIt. Fivery precaution should ho taken during the making of butter to pro vent the complaint of softness wbiuh is bo frequently hoard1 in the summer Heather. Fxporienced dairymaids, of course, knew well how to avoid the fault, but it proves a trouble to np;:ny a less expert butter-'.nflking. The cause lies in tho high tompora tme of tho dairy, and, unfortunate ly, many a fannhouso dairy i.s in riifforontiy fitted for its puri.oHo. Kvery effort must bo mado to k*-op tho iipartir.ent cool, as unless tbi.s oan be done thore is littlo hope «if overcoming tho difficulty. During thi* bent uf tl-e day, when the out side air is warmer than that irisido, tho oorriduts shoul'l be kept closed, or their plice may well bo tnkon by white oauvis kept constantly moist. When tlm air outsidt; is cool it should l)i- admitted freely. In numy cases -i oool daily foi churning can bo obtained only by doing tho -vork very early in tho' n..iri/ing or late, in the evening, in nny case ...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 22 November 1910

The Safe & Kapid Way of Casftf atiag IPrice, ^S/» Tho ol'.l way waa noithor wifo nor oflioionfc. Tho appro vorl way proven ts los* of rttocsk, is safo, liygienio, handy, und oxpediteo tho work. Thin in by using It is tho host known iiinkrutnont for castrating HorEca, CJolta, Bulls, or llama. Tim upper blodo is solid and pussea through tbo lower blado, which is funestratod and bo finished that tho cord is crushed boforo being o aovored, thus provontinir liiomorrliaf/o. A nplrn-il-I instrument, handnomflly llniaheil and en/lily clcanod. Writn (or It to-day ; also (or our lint at 1 other VctorinaTy Appliances. DENVER BROTHERS Sarsrical and Veterinary U&N V S.n K»r»U I ntno -.Instrument Makars 231 QEOHGE STREET, SYDNEY.

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 22 November 1910

t of ^IWKESWOCTH'S % o w ^ 0 „ ? . * S a ' * S IS NOW KEADY. | o - BE1 * O r v ? 1 ? ?♦ ^ npHE value of 'SHEEP and WOOL' to ♦ $ Sheepmen is undoubted. The fact of -g- O the First and Second Editions having been ♦ Y sold outright is proof that the book fills a & -- want, and wo had no hesitation in bringing £ | out THIS THIRD ENLARGED AND *. ♦ REVISED EDITION. ♦ I Have you read ' SHEEP 1H0 WOOL?' I ^ If not, you haven't lva I all there is to read ♦ J* on the subject, and farther you arc missing ^ O the best that has been written on Australian ♦' ^ Sheep and Wool. £ % Shall we send you a copy for 8/8? % S WILLIAM BROOKS & COo LTD. ♦ -^ I'rinters, Statioxkks and Pur.M.suKiw, V £ 17 CASTLERSAG-H ST., SYDNEY. + ; % ♦

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 22 November 1910

S Protect Your Feet by wearing Patent Asbestos Socks. 5 /Sl*^ No Mora Pains In tho Feot. ThoComrort Experienced --» I -©S?5w8i». ln Wearing Asbestos Socks la Absolutely Marvellous. ^/^f^'A A M&&'8r% Hdt, Perspiring, Inflamed and Tender Feet. Corns, ^J%-?£%AA .1 6P^*$&'4$&i B«nl°n° and Bod Feet Prevented and Absolutely Cured S%^%%M I tWP*^y?tMl by wearln£ Patent Asbestos Socks, isolr,). \$&&~' ' Wa W$3|X^8jfi$I5''6lllly rouE'' grained surface prevents the foot slipping in-sulc, .ind wnlliinR is \§0M$$$f i V?iBBvwB**M 'lus 'cs3 l'r'nK' AsbestO3 beini; a nonconductor tlir feet arc kept VjW.vlv/'Svy Kvft$$i'$V 'tom ''e variations cau*eJ bv hot or cold weather, a g'-nuine jov \-W/'$$$! rS£$$™-^j nndt)l««ng to tha tendcrfnotc.l. In fact tho comfort experienced Jv:1':;/*'^ t'#i-4s*#?f 'n wearing these socks ta absolutely marvellous. Try » k:S::S:Sl i \%W%xM pair at once. Satisfaction Guaranteed -r money refunded. [:-:M-i0A SW They will renew ...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Dairy (Continued from page 3.) THE CALF PATH. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 22 November 1910

The Dairy (Continued from paijo '.) i : THE CALF PATH. One day through tho primeval wood, A calf walked homo its good calves should. ' But made a trail all bent askew, A crooked, trail as all calved do. Since then two hundred years have i tied And, hereby lianas my moral tale. TSie trail was taken up next day By a lone dog that passed that way. And then a wise bell-wether sheep Pursued the trail o'er vale and steep. And drew die tloek 'oehiud him. too, Ah good bell-wethers always do. And from that day o'er hill and glade And from those old woods a path was jnade. And many men wound in and out Aud dodged and turned and bent about, And uttered words of righteous wrath Keeause 'twas such a crooked path. ? And still they followed, do not laii/a The first migrations of that calf. This first path became a lane That bent and turned aud turned again. This crooked hi le became a road Where tnnuy a poor horse with his load Toiled on henonth the burning sun And gravelled some three* miles in o...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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