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Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Ch... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 28,405 items from Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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THE CHINESE AND MEMORY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 24 January 1914

THE CHINESE AND MEMORY. I Ki'erylhiug is subordinated in Chinese .schools to training the memory. Know ledge as we i.ndc island it., is qu;to a secondary tiling in the cuii I'm1 t hill. Lilt? Chinese schools giv<\ Hi-ijoi it ionim ecasing repetition, forms iho routine <»t school lile in China. The mind is .stored with words ;md sounds often wholly unintelligible to Urn pupil mul not* understood h\ the teacher himself. This eonstanL repetition leads to the reteii tiveiiess ol meniory almoM incredible to those who liave not cutiie in con tact with Oriental students. A good example of the surprising ex tent to which Chinese students cul tivate tho memory occurred at one of the examinations for tho diploma of the college of medicine- All tin* students answered the questions cor rectly, hut on comparing the. papers it was found that they were indentical. Words, paragraphs, sentences, full stops, and commas wero precisely alike. Tho examiners, new to Chinese methods ...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
COOKERY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 24 January 1914

COOK-UK V. Almond Gnko.- -Hub two omioixs of butter, into the ounces Hour, iivo oumva powdered sugar, then put it to tho oilier grodients. Add ono ounoo blanched almonds and a Ht.tlo almond llavor, roll them in your hand to tho size of a nutmeg, and sprinkle with tino sugar, Thcv should 1m> lightly bakoil. . Potato Surprises.—Half « pound of sausages, twelve ouneos of cooked potatoes, ono ounce of butter, n little sail and popper, two eggs, and bread crumbs. Mask tho potatoes, add tho salt, pepper and molted butter. Cook tlie sausages, out in two, and eovor each pioco with tho potato. finish with egg and roll in breadcrumbs, tlion fry in boiling fat till nicely browned. Voal Fritters.—You will tind this nu excellent way in which to use up tho romniiLs of cold voal. Mince tlio moat vory finely, and season with salt and popper. Make a good butter with Hour, milk, and ono egg-; mix tho moat with this, nnd drop it, a spoonful at a time, into the boiling fat. Fry a golden brown, druiu...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MARRIED FOLKS WOULD BE HAPPIER. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 24 January 1914

MARRIED FOLKS WOULD BE HAPPIER. If they tried to bo as agreeable as in courtship days. If each would try to bo a real sup port and comfort to each otlier. If household expenses were always proportioned to receipts. If each remembered the other was practically a human boing, not an angel. If men were as thoughtful for their wives as they were for them when sweethearts. If both parties remembered that they were married for worse as well as for bott-er. If there wero fewer "please, darl ings," in public, and moro politeness in private. If wives and husbands would tfilio their pleasures as tlioy go along, and not degenerate into mere toiliug machines.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ABOUT TEA-MAKING. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 24 January 1914

ABOUT TEA-MAKING. Do not use water which has boiled a long- time, and do not use water which has not yet readied boiling1 point. Do not allow tea to brew for more than five minutes. Do not make tea in a cold tea-pot; rinse the pot with hot water and drain it well before placing the tea in the pot. Do not allow the tea to-grow damp in the caddy. For preference, use a porcelain or earthenware teapot; tea experts tell us that the fragrant leaf should never touch metal. The worst education that teaches self-denial is better than the best which . teaches everything else and not that.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FACTS AND FANCIES. Queer Facts about Colours. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 24 January 1914

: FACTS AND IWNCIEtf. I Quoor Facts about Colours. I .xpci imc'iiis liiivt: been made to de termine what colour in a soldier's uni lonn is the. least conspicuous lo an enemy. Of ten men, t\vf> were dressed in litfht Krey uniform, two in dark K"ty, two in jjitcii, two in dark blue,, and two in scarlet. All were then or dered to march o!!*, while a jrroup of ollicers remainod watching: thein. The fir-t to disappear in the landscape was the lijilu tfrey, and next, sm prising as it may seem, tho scarlet. Then fol lowed the dark grey, while the dark blue and the tfrcen remained visible lonff alter all the others had disap peared. Kxperiments in firing iit blue and red targets proved that blue could be more easily seen at a distance than red.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WORSE STILL. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 24 January 1914

WORSE STILL. "Absurd!" fmnod the fussy -com mercial, as u fellow-breakfaster entered tho coffee-room. "Don't know what these hotels aro comin' to, I'm sure; I've licon here tho wholo blessed week, and can't got. anvthin' of a mornin' but e^gs-eggs—«ggs." "Hut they're diifcrcnt eggs," observ ed his companion, sadly tucking his napkin under his chin. "Well, of course they're different," snapped the fussy commercial, "Then bo thankful for at least that consolation," replied tho other, "and don't he too hard on hotels. I know a place, my friend, where I am given a hot joint one day, renew its ac quaintance in a state of frigidity on the next, toy with its mangled re mains in tho form of hash on tho third, flirt with it among macaroni and tomato sauce on the fourth, and pro bably on the fifth detect it lurking yet again in the recesses of a rissole!" "Great Scot!" oxclaimod tho com mercial, brought awuy from bis own troubles at last. "Where's that ?" "Iu a little place," replied the sile...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE CLOSE RACER. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 24 January 1914

THE CLOSE RACER. A "record" has just been created by a gentleman who raced round the world in 35 days 21 hours 30 minutes. This is not so extraordinary as ap pears at first sight, for anyone with the inclination and money can hustle round tho world in thirty-seven days, as follows:— By leaving London (Euston) at noon on Saturday, and catching the Maure tania, New York could be reached on tho following Thursday—six days. Leaving New York the sumo evening by train, via Montreal, our hustler would arrive in Vancouver on tho Tuesday following—eleven days. One night could bo spent in Van couver; then on again, by steamer, to Yokohama, which would be reached on Sunday week—twenty-three days, thence by train the same evening to Tsuruga, which would bo mado tho following morning. Hy boarding a/ train that night Vladivostock would bo roached in two days—twenty-live days. Leaving Vladivostock the same evening, ho would reach .Moscow ten days later, and in two more ho could step out of the tra...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BIue, Yellow, and White Waves. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 24 January 1914

BIuo, Yollow, and Whlto Waves. The blucncss of sea-water depends greatly on its saitncss. In the tro pics, the tremendous evaporation induced by the blazing sun causes the water to be much Salter than it is in higher latitudes. For about 30deg. north and south of the Equator the waters are of an exquisite azure. Be yond these latitudes, the blue changes to green, and, in tjie Arctic and Ant arctic Oceans the greens are almost as vivid as the tropical blues. The extraordinary blucncss of the Mediterranean has two causes. Few large rivers of fresh water run into this sea, and, moreover, the Mediter ranean is virtually land-locked, and ex posed to a powerful sun, so thai evap oration is rapid. By actual test the waters of the Mediterranean are heav ier and contain more salt than those of the Atlantic. The Yeljow Sea of China is usually supposed to owe its colour to the floor of muddy water that its great river pours into it. Living organisms are responsible for the peculiar tint. Occas...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Diamonds in Meteoric Showers. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 24 January 1914

Diamonds in Meteoric Showers. I Scientific authorities arc inclining' to I the belief that all diamonds came to the earth in mctcoric showers. The i theory is that the diamond fell to the earth as a meteorite at a late period of I the earths' formation. Late discoveries in the Western States of America, especially in Arizo na, seem to indicate further the "hea venly origin" of the most brilliant stone, for over the broad and open plains for areas of miles in diameter, several thousand masses of metallic iron have been scattered. Not Ions: ago an enthusiastic miner alogist, working on the mass, cut into a section and found that the tools were injured by something" harder than me tallic iron. He examined the speci mens chemically, and soon announced that the meteorite contained black and transparent diamonds. And sincc then the search for diamonds in meteorites has occupied the attention of chemists all over the world. Again, it is claimed that it is pos sible that the so-called '"vol...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Kettles Big and Little. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 24 January 1914

Kettles Big and Little* The copper steam kettle made at St. Louis for a firm of brewers, and in the construction of which between 7000 ;incl 8000 pounds of copper was used ,is probably the largest thing of its kind in the world. In sugar-refining factories, metallic vessels called kettles are used, some of which are capable of holding 1000 gallons. The hughest articles in the culinary line are to be found in the kitchen (known as the largest in the world) of the Bon Marche in Paris. Amongst the smallest enumerated are "kettles," the smallest holding 75 quarts, and the largest 375. Even the frying-pans are so large, as to be able to cook .'100 cutlets in each, and to fry 220 lbs. of potatoes. An Oxford ironmonger possesses two of the most curious kettles ever made. The largest holds 50 gallons, and until lately was hung outside as a sign. Tt was a' genuine article, however, and was used for the proper purposes of a kettle on certain special occasions. The other kettle, believed to be...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Three Ideas of Nothing. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 24 January 1914

Throo Ideas of Nothing. In an Irish school not lonpr ago a school teacher asked a class to define "Nothing".' Fie wrote the question or: the blackboard, and did so quickly and rather carelessly. A little red-headed fallow's hand shot up. "Well, Thady, what is nothing?" said the. tcachcr. "You may tell us." "It's the dot on the i ye've just for gotten to make, sorrl"' was the trium phant reply. An equally good definition was that of the lad who declared that nothing was "a footless stocking- without a leg." He. too, was Irish. Less imaginative, but no less convincing, was the mercenary definition given by a canny "chiel" in Scotland. "It's when a man asks ve to haud his horse," he explained, ruefully, "and then just says, 'Thank ye.' "

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FRUITS AND HEALTH. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 24 January 1914

FRUITS AND HEALTH. A ffoil-known food specialist saya, in speaking of the peculiarities of various foods, that:— Blanched almonds givo the higher nervo or brain muscle food; 110 heat or waste. Walnuts givo nervo or brain food, muscle, heat, and waste. Grcon water grapes are blood-purify ing (but of little food value); reject pips and skins. Black grapes aro feeding and blood purifying, but too rich for thoso who suffer from the liver. Tomatoes are good as nerve or brain food; no heat. They are thinning and stimulating. Do not swallow the skins. Juicy fruits give moro or less higher nervo or brain, and some few musole food and waste; no heat. Apples supply tho higher nervo and muscle food, but do not givo stay. Oranges are refreshing and feeding, hut are not good if tho liver is out of order. Green figs are excellent food. Dried figs contain nerve and musclo food, heat, and waste, but aro bad for tho liver. All stone fruits are considered to bo injurious for those who suffer from the...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW COLDS ARE CAUGHT. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 24 January 1914

HOW GOLDS ARE OATTGHT. . We aro so ignorant of the real na ture of that common and disagrooahlo ailment known familiarly as a cold that wo do in nine cases out of ton, with the idea of preventing it, tho vory tiling from which it arises. Catarrh, of tho nasal mucous membrane is contracted not from exposure to cold air, as is generally supposed, but from want of fresh air. Aran abandoning ^natural habits and wading, sometimes not purposely at all bnt from necessity, the stimulation afforded by exorcise, shuts himself in overheated, ill-ventil atod rooms, where immunity to infec tion is lowered, and tho mass influence of tho infecting bacteria is greatly in creased. Coming out of suoh a wann room, a sense of (fiscomfort is felt on encountering tho puro fresli air, and when in tho course of the next day a man develops the catarrh with its at tendant miseries of running nose, aud stinging throat, perhaps also head ache, ho puts the trouble down, not tn tho real cause, tho gorm-infeoted,...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
REMEDIES FOR EARACHE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 24 January 1914

REMEDIES FOR EARACHE. Hot applications, such as a hot-watur bottle*, or flannel cloths wrung out of hot water, and applied to tlio ear will often givo instant relief, especially if tlio pain is caused by nouralgia in the face or head. If you do not lvavo n liot-wator bot tle, a flannol sack filled with hops can bo used. -Make a small sack of llantiel, fill it with hops, and dip the bag of hops into very hot water, wring it out as dry as possible and apply to the ear. This forms a very good form of moist heat, and if dry flannol cloth is placed over the head, covering the ban of hops, this will hold tlio steam ami make ono of the best ways thero is of steaming tlio car. Of course, as the hops become cold, they can bo dipped in the hot water again. Another method is to heat salt, just common table salt, until it is quito hot, put it in a flannel bag, and apply to tlie oar.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BLEEDING AND HOW TO STOP IT. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 24 January 1914

BLEEDING AND HOW TO STOl' IT. It is wol! to bear in mind that nits about t>ho head and face, especially tlio nose, blood prcitusrly. .Muny u m., tlior litis hnd a terrible fright bv a child running in with its clothes, hands and face all smeared with blood. H is astonishing what a: moss a, child will manngo to make of a spoonful or two of blood. Try to keep cool and colln l ed. You will find, moat ptobubly, whon you have washed with cold water, that tho amount, of injury is a id.to trifle. If it is difiicult to stop tho blooding, a most invaluable remedy, and one you will lind in almost every cottage, is the whiting or pipe-clay. l'ut a thick cover ing of either of those on tho wound, then a bit of diy lint, and press it closely for ir few minutes; let what, sticks to tho wound remain thero, and cover with a bit of piaster.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HEALTH IN THE HOME. TO THOSE WHO WEAR GLASSES. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 24 January 1914

ii liALTIL IN T1L.IS IIOM]r TO Til OHIO WHO WICAli. OUssKij S'o many people nowadays advisedly wear eyeglasses; anil those who Irmol much—cyclists unci others in course ,>f businoss routine—orten liiul their sif.ln considerably impaired owing in tV,u cloudincss of their glasses—eliielly duo to atmospheric conditions. To surli ||10 following reeipo (given by un citin of not«) will provo invahiaMi" l'nko equal parts of water, alcohol, ami toilet ammonia; mix together, and |mt into ft fihiss bottle, keeping it u,.ll corked. Spray the eyeglass 0very hum u. iiig with a little of tho mixture, ami then rub with a soft cloth, polishlm; tinully with tissue paper. This bus lnV„ well tosted and declared o boon by many who had previously sulforeU from oyo strain.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CONUNDRUMS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 24 January 1914

CONUNDRUMS. Why is a nowly-bom babe liko a gale of wind?—Becauso it begins with a squall. Wiiy is a blado of grass liko a bill of exehango?—Becauso it is matured by falling dow (due). What is tho differenco betweoil an organist and tho influenza ?—Ono knows tho stops, and tho other stops tho nose. When may a ship be said to be am bitiously in lovo?—When sho's making up to a pier (peer). Why is a vain young lady liko a con finned drunkard?—Becauso neither of thorn is satisfied with tho modorato use of tlvo glass. What- tuno can to made out of bank notes?—A for-tuno. What wonderful metamorphosis is a laundress subject to?—Sho goes to bod a laundress, and gets up fino linen. Why is a lucky gambler an ugreo ablo follow ?—Because ho has sucti win ning ways. What is that which Adam nover saw, nover'possrased, and yet gavo to oacli of his children?—Parents. Why is a newspaper liko an army? —Becauso it has leaders, columns, and roviowB.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
USEFUL HINTS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 24 January 1914

USEFUL HINTS. The hen that is active, scratching and singing, is the one that lays the eggs. Do not make the food for the liens too soft. It is not good for them that way. Add all meat scraps you can to the feed of the hens during the winter. They need it. Moulting fowls require nitrogenous food. Meat, wheat, bran, and linseed meal, animal meal, groen cut bone and the like will furnish it. Canker in the mouth may extend to throat and become diphtheria. The diphtheria of fowls and man are dif ferent, according to veterinarians, but attendants an sick birds have been known to take poultry diphtheria. An ordinary cold, if taken at once, can be arrested by a 1-grain pill of quinine forced down the sick bird, (live some bread crumbs in connec tion1;, to cause quick digestion. Use oarthern water dishes, not tin, for medical use.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NEW, ODD, INTERESTING. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 24 January 1914

NEW, ODD, INTERESTING. The Bank o!' Knf'him] iliwtioyii about iWO.OOO of its liotos nvory week. No school in C/mmla run roccivo ilio Government, grain, unless tho Union Jack is hoisted every morning. Analysts say that- butler is Mio moM nutritious article of diet, and that baron coincs next. Tho forests in I ml in. iinilcr Govern ment control bring in a not profit t(i llio Statu or over £150,000, Germany is nblo to fcixl aliont nino tpntlis of her nearly (19,000,000 inhabi tants on tliu products of lior own soil. Tho traffic over London Bridge ave rages daily 100,000 pedestrians and 'JO,000 vehicles. One test for distinguishing diamonds from glass and pasto is to touch thorn with tho tongue. Tho diamond fools much the colder. Spain lias moro sunshine than any country in Europe. The yearly ave rage is 3,000 hours. In England it is 1,400. A law rccontly passed in Norway raaltcB girls inoligiblo for matrimony unless thoy can show certificates of skill in cooking, knitting, and spinning...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE POULTRY RUN. CONCERNING THE MOULT. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 24 January 1914

1-HK POULTRY I! IJN. CONCt'.l<NIN(j Till-: MOUI/r. During 111'- moulting season fowls undergo I'"" "f •I"' greatest trials of their lives, and at no other time do the birds in:cil greater can' to enable them lo properly cast oil' their old feathers ami replace them with new plumage. w It should be remembered tliat. during the process of moulting, die fowls havi' not only to maintain the necessary vitality conducive to the well-being of their bodies, such as tlx: nmt'inual reproduction of tissue and blond, but they have, in addition to these elements, to produce new plum age.. Therefore, it is obvious that foods, rich in the necessary constitu ents are essential if the birds are to pass safely through the moulting sea son well feathered and in such a con stitutional condition as to tit them for egg production and breeding purposes. It takes something like one hundred days for a fowl to get thoroughly through the moult, and during' that time there is a great strain piaced u...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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