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Elephind.com contains 185,322 items from Prairie Farmer, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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EDUCATION MAKES THE DISTINCTION , ' [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1843

EDUCATION MAKES THE DISTINCTION , And who has made this distinction—so nice—so sacred ? i It has been created b y those who , perchance , were themT .. selves sons of blacksmiths , soapers , and tinkers , but wjiq ,, have been able , by the solution of some strange problem , ! to , define the difference between a poor man bred a . lawyer , ; and a poor man bred a mechanic- , but who have yet , to ^ learn that a cobblers sonis not the son of a cobbler , ajthbu g lj , he may have become distinguished and wealthy . —N . Y , Farmer and Mechanic . We beg leave , in the spirit of charity and friendship , to differ with our nei ghbor s sentiment : we do not think the problem he speaks of a strange one , nor the solution difficult , and will therefore undertake lp solve it . The poor man bred a lawyer . The three words , bred a lawyer , signify that he has been educated , and that he has been educated for the profession of the law ; it signifies that his mind has been trained for the examin...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
ANCIENT WORKSHOPS . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1843

ANCIENT WORKSHOPS . • crbt I ^ . a u ndingthe ° P lnion of Plato-we believe a de , Phew A „ the r w ° !; ks h ° psof Dsedalus , and of Talus , hisneChios / Z se , ? fT heoclorus , of Samos , and of Glaucus of accounfof f ^ ^ n ^ of the inl W of metals , ) an Dodonean 1 , ir ° CeSS ° f raaWn S the f «* ° 5 e Lesbian and ebrated ^ v r r ° n ? aml <* tbe ™ tb ° d b y which those celSiTchhavo Tn SS A n glass were < ™ d . fronts of 2 tntinue toZtTl ° ! ^ ^ hav * ^ M « d ( tbeES- P uz , zle , both our artists and our chemists ; ms ^ S I v W , hlCh , ofthemost ™ inute and exquisite finmsh paSs entirel y and uniforml y through the glass ;) if to **• jm added the particulars of ; a working jewellers thop of Psrsspolu and of Troy ; of a lapidary s and an . n- graw s of Memphis i of a cutler s and upholstet s of Damascus ; snd of a cabinet , maker s and brazier s of Rome ; together with those of a Sidonian or Athenian ship vard—such a record would have been more truly use...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
MECHANICS . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1843

MECHANICS . Out of nothing , nothing comes . The laws of nature , unlike human laws , can neither be changed nor evaded ; and for a want of a proper knowledge of simple and unchangeable laws many men waste time and money in trying to produce great effects by insufficient means . The power most easily measured is that of gravity or weight ; and it is the cheapest of all powers or first movers , when , as in the case of a waterfall , nature constantly winds up the weight for us for nothing . Suppose , then , we have one thousand pounds of water falling ten feet in a minute . No human contrivance can make that water raise more than its own weight to the heig ht pf ten feet in the same time . It cannotraise quite as much , for the friction of the maphinery must waste part of tiie power ; but , as it may be a small part , let us omit the friction from these calculations . The effect ofthe mechanical powers is to enable us , while the original power remains the same , and the rate of its ...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
_ .., MECHANICS . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1843

_ .., MECHANICS . Why are wheels generally made of a dished form that is , inclincmg outwards ? Because they thus acquire astonishing strength , indeed that of the arch , as contrasted with the flat or upright wheel ; the dished form is further useful in this , that when the carriage is on an inclined road and more of the weight consequently falls upon the wheel ofthe lower side , the inferior spokes of the wheels become nearly perpendicular , and therefore support the increased weight more safely . — The disadvantage of these wheels , however , is , the inclining wheel naturally describing a curved path , the horses , in drawing straight forward , have to overcome this deviating tendency in all the wheels . —Arnott . Why are the fore-wheels of carnages smaller than the hind-wheels ? , Because they facilitate the turning ofthe carriage . _ The advantage ofthe wheel is proportioned to the magnitude j the smaller wheel having to raise a steeper curve . It is not true , however , accor...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
REVOLVING HORSE RAKE . ( Fig . 11 . ) [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1843

REVOLVING HORSE RAKE . ( Fig . 11 . ) After having had the engraving on page 58 executed , we found one in the Cultivator more complete , and we annexed to ours the descri ption connected with it . The accompanying illustration of different parts , makes the description more intelligible . The lettering is in conformity with , Fig . 7 . A B , the head ; H a lace rounded for the p handle C , which is fastened b y an iron strap passing over its end , and similar places are made for the arms , E E ^ Fig . 7 . ) an end of which , showing the iron strap fastened to ft , is represented by G . 0 the pieces of iron attached to the head , connecting it with the pieces F F ( Fig . 7 . ) W

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
LABOR-SAVING IMPLEMENTS AND MACHINES . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1843

LABOR-SAVING IMPLEMENTS AND MACHINES . Planters do not seem to understand the advantages the West offers for the introduction of truly valuable improvements in implements of husbandry & c . Labor being more expensive here than in most sections , the farmer finds it good economy to expend money in purchasing such implements as will save him the hiring of men ; so that a patenfee has only to convince prairie fanners that his invention is no humbug , but really valuable , and he would open to himself a large market . Such machines as Hussey s for reaping , his corn and cob- . crusher , threshing machines and horse powers , corn-shellers , corn-planters , seed-sowers , & c . & c , are much wanted in this section . We should like to publish descriptions , and patentees . would find it for their interest to do so in conformity with our terms on the first page . We would also act as agent in disposing of those consi gned to us . W .

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
THE MECHANICS ' EXHIBITION . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1843

THE MECHANICS EXHIBITION . We are pleased to learn the mechanics take so much in-, terest in the exhibition the Institute has determined to hold . next autumn , Not only will it be gratifying to see a fine display of articles of their own manufacture , butit will prove of great service to them by convincing farmers , merchants and others , that as good articles can be made in . the West as . elsewhere , and that if proper encouragement were extended to them , they could sell as cheap as others . It is wrong , most decidedly , to bring so many articles from abroad which our own mechanics would be glad to furnish ; and if the present interest in the exhibition be kept up , which will secure a grand display , it will have a strong tendency to increase the demand for furniture , farming implements , & c , of western manufacture . The exhibition is most important to mechanics , not onl y in Chicago , but throughout the West , and it will conduce to their prosperity generally ...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
ADVANTAGES OF A LIBRARY ASSOCIATION . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1843

ADVANTAGES OF A LIBRARY ASSOCIATION . FEW men are able to purchase all the books they wish to read , and a large portion of books are of a kind that would not be read twice and are not books of reference ; and consequently in a private library are useless and involve an unnecessary expenditure , in any place where it would be convenient for a number of persons to associate to buy books of that character . B ut as few have the means to procure a private library , they may , by united exertion , make up for this deficiency of means . Books are now the great source of knowled ge ; and we might say of it what Franklin does of money—Knowled ge begets knowledge , and its offspring begets more . Every person in this age should have access to books ; every scrap of knowledge that we obtain , and every new idea that we get is put at interest , and the earlier it is obtained the oftener it will be compounded . One ofthe paramount objects of our Institute is a library ; and all the members con...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
WHERE IS A MARKET FOR OUR SURPLUS ? [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1843

WHERE IS A MARKET FOR OUR SURPLUS ? To western farmers a correct answer to this inquiry is becoming of vital importance . Twenty years since , and the agricultural products ofthe western States were hardly known at the East , and now the market in the principal staples , except wool , is regulated by our supplies . That there is to be no diminution of our productions , but on the contrary a still more rapid increase , no one can doubt who is conversant with our condition . We havo but just commenced exporting . Except Ohio and southern Indiana and Illinois , and the Great West has only been preparing for farming operations . A good proportion of the products have been consumed at home by immigration , and only a small part of the present population have heretofore raised much for a foreign market . Tho last two or three years , to be sure , some have been indicating what they intend to do when they get their farms in full operation , and tho effect is witnessed in tho fall in price ...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
BOMMER'S METHOD OF MAKING MANURE . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1843

BOMMERS METHOD OF MAKING MANURE . WE should like to learn more of this process of making manure . If it bo in reality what it was recommended to be last fall , it will prove valuable to western farmers . Straw , corn stalks , old hay ,. refuse and litter of every description , is put into a heap and by a patent process is fermented and becomes most excellent manure in about a fortnight . Most grain in tho West is now threshed with machines , and the farmer by stacking his grain in the field and threshing it there , can convert his straw into manure , and havo it convenient to spread over the ground , thus saving the labor of draw- • ing both straw and manure . Very many prairie farmers are already convinced of the benefits of applying manures to their lands •; and those who are as yet skeptical , soon will bo . It appears absurd to suppose any soil will bear repeated draughts upon it by the removal of large crops and suffer no diminution of its fertilizing properties , when thero is...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
THE PRAIRIE FARMER . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1843

THE PRAIRIE FARMER . APRIL , 18 43 . OFFICERS OF THE UNION AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY . UNION IS STRENGTH . SAMUEL ANDERSON , of Du Page Co . President . LEWIS ELLSWORTH , DU Page 1 THERON D . BREWSTER , La Salle WM . NOBLE DAVIS , Kendall ) Vice Presidents . WILLIAM SMITH , Will SETII WASHBURN , Lake J E . W . BREWSTER , Kane Treasurer . JOHN S . WRIGHT , Cook Roc . Sec . Do . do . Cor . Sec .

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
INDIAN HEMP . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1843

INDIAN HEMP . BY M . L . KNAPP . To the Editor ofthe Prairie Farmer : It is not generally known , I reckon , that we have an indigenous species of hemp growing in great luxuriance on the creek and river bottoms . Such is the fact nevertheless , and I have often thought when coming upon a patch of it , and seeing how tall , straight and beautiful it grows spontaneously , that I would call the attention of our enterprising agriculturists to it in the hope that a trial might be made of its capabilities as a cultivated crop . My opportunities for observing the habitudes ofthis plant have been great , for it is powerfully medicinal , and was chosen as the subject of my inaugural Thesis in 1825 , and examined with considerable care in the labaratory of Professor Green , attached to the Jefferson Medical College , Philadel phia , and although its medicinal properties were made the chief object of research , still its qualities adapting it for usefulness in the arts were not overlooked . Sa...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
{ FARMERS' LIBRARIES-A SUGGESTION . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1843

{ FARMERS LIBRARIES-A SUGGESTION . Mr . Editor : We all of us feel the want of standard works , and as the Arts and Sciences are receiving new contributions almost daily in the shape of essays , lectures , reports , transactions and publications of every name and nature , the idea has occurred to me that an arrangement might be made between you and the farmers ofthis sort . The proprietors ofthe New World continue to publish their Extra Numbers , almost weekly . These do not consist wholly of romances , but of realty valuable , historical , biographical , scientific and standard works . The publications are issued at the low rate of from twelve and a half to twenty five cents each—depending upon the length . They are forwarded by the mails at onl y newspaper postage . Their form and size is precisely the same as the Prairie Farmer . Now , to any person who will hereafter procure five subscribers to the Prairie Farmer , give a sixth copy gratis and one of these Extras , Liebegs Agric...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
FARMERS' ASSOCIATION , BYRON , OGLE CO . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1843

FARMERS ASSOCIATION , BYRON , OGLE CO . BY II . NORTON , SEC . To die Editor of the Prairie Farmer : Sir , in January last a society was organised in this place , called The Farmers and Mechanics Association of Byron , having for its objects the dissemination of knowledge pertaining to the agricultural and mechanical interests—the promotion of home industry—the interchange of views and opinions—the cultivation ofthe social virtues and improvement in domestic economy , & c . & c . As the Secretary of the Association , I shall endeavor to keep you informed of whatever is deemed worthy of publication . Our constitution is similar to that adopted by the Waynesville Farmers Club , as published in the second vol . of the Agriculturist . We alread y number upwards of thirty members—have held five meetings at which we have had three addresses and several interesting debates . Most of our discussions have been upon subjects connected with our plans of operation , and ...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1843

EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT . COMMON SCHOOL EDUCATION . To the statesman , the philanthropist , the christian , common school education especially commends itself . Each values a means according to its effect upon mind—in proportion to tho controlling influence it exerts upon tho mass of ihe people . And of all means for quqlifyiny men to perform tho various duties of life , none is to be compared with common school education , The necessity of education will be admitted by all ; and here in the West , for years to come , it must chiefly be obtained by common schools , In tho most favored States , where academies , high schools , colleges , & c . most abound , not a fifth part of tho children and youth are instructed in them ; even there the groat majority receive their education in common schools . Tho now States cannot expect , with many years labor , to possess tho advantages of the older ones , and for a long period common schools will furnish the only practicable plan fo...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
-r .. - HT - T GRAFTING—NEW METHOD . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1843

-r .. - HT - T GRAFTING—NEW METHOD . Mr . LEE , a correspondent of the Conn . Farm . Gaz ., gives the following new method of grafting trees , and says he has repeatedly witnessed the process in Georgia and Alabama , and has been informed it is always successful . — Trees can be rapidly multiplied by this morle , for that rea son it . may be valuable where young trees are difficult to be obtained ; but where sprouts of a year old can be obtained in sufficient quantities , the process of root-grafting , as described by Mr . HARKNESS on page 24 , vol . ii ., appears to us the best . Plant , the seed in rows at a suitable distance from each other , and the hills say about live feet apart in each row . — But one tree should be suffered to grow in a place . Now when the young tree is sufficiently grown , in the spring of the second or third year , any quality of fruit may be grafted into it in the following manner : First , bend the tree over and obtain for it a firm resting place , eith...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
TO SAVE TREES GIRDLED BY MICE . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1843

TO SAVE TREES GIRDLED BY MICE . The following is from the pen of David Thomas of Cayuga co . N . Y . We know not to what paper to credit it . Trees completely girdled by the mice , may be saved b y setting grafts early in the spring to restore the communication between the two detached portions ofthe tree—in other words , by grafting them together . Part , of a small branch should be inlaid , both above and below ; and if skilfully done and carefully coated over with grafting mud or wax , it will be very likely to grow , except on the peach Or nectarine . We have succeeded in this way on a pear tree ; but three or four should beset round the tree . fa .

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
A SUPERINTENDENT OF COMMON SCHOOLS . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1843

A SUPERINTENDENT OF COMMON SCHOOLS . THE chief cause of failure in procuring the creation of this oflico by tho Illinois legislature tho past session was , that the people wero not prepared for it and did not desire it . The petitions which were so extensively circulated in all parts of the State , were not presented as wo expected . Had they been forwarded well signed , the plan would have succeeded beyond a doubt . The chief reason for not signing them was the dislike to ask for the creation of another office , under the present embarrassments of the State treasury . Several have written us to ibis effect , and from our own observation at Springfield anil elsewhere we are convinced of its truth . Now had it been considered that tho expense , say $ 1200 per annum , would be only about $ 13 to a county , and not a single dollar to a school district , very few would have refused their signatures , when they compared the cost with the advantages to bo derived from tho labors of an eff...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
IMPARTING INSTRUCTION AT HOME . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1843

IMPARTING INSTRUCTION AT HOME . BY A I . ADY . THERE is no complaint more common in the farming districts ofour state , than that relating to the scarcity of schools . This lamentation is particularly frequent with those who emigrated from New England or New York , where long established and gradually improved common school systems diffuse some light in every district . They say how shall we provide for our children s education . iney . are just that , age when they oug ht to be in school , but we have no school house , and if we had one , while money is so scarce , and the inhabitants so few , we can t afford to hire a teacher . Oh , if we only had a school as handy as when we lived east , wo should be quite contented . It is probable this deficiency of schools will continue in some neig hbourhoods , and , as it is deplorable to allow families to grow up in ignorance the whilst , may I suggest to those concerned , the propriety of adopting at once such a planus will interfere least...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
STRAWBERRIES . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1843

STRAWBERRIES . From the Farmers Cabinet . A STRAWBERRY bed is considered an essential requisite in the kitchen garden , and the fanner who is desirous of a supply of this delicious fruit , should not neglect to allot a portion of ground to this object . Il : is not only a delicious fruit , but is conducive to health , and said to be an excellent dentifrice . The strawberry is easily cultivated , is an abundant bearer , may be readily gathered , and is more luscious than many other cultivated fruits . The strawberry is cultivated with great variety of success , and it is to be suspected the failures that have occurred , in most instances , have been for want of a knowledge ofthe Dioecious * character of the plants cultivated , and of the proper management of such variety . The Magazine of Horticulture for the present year con tains two communications from N . Longworth of Cincinnati , Ohio , together with some judicious observations by the editor , tending to establish the Dioecious ...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
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