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Elephind.com contains 658,475 items from Columbia Daily Spectator, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 3,057 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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COLLEGE WORLD. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 February 1879

COLLEGE WORLD. Amherst : The candidates for the base ball nine have gone into training, and are all boarding together at the Amherst House. They don't mean to have any lack of success next summer attributable to lack of conscientious work. Arrangements were made by the Glee Club to give four concerts during the term at the following times and places: Brooklyn, Jan. 21; Worcester, Jan. 27; Westboro, Jan, 28 ; with the last at Amherst, though the time has not yet been settled. The other evening a senior and one of his lady friends went out to try the fine sleighing. On their return it was discovered that the right ear of the senior and the left of his companion were badly frost bitten while the other two ears were untouched. Conundrum, " How could it have happened ?" The junior optional course has now had a sufficient trial in Amherst to assure its projectors that it is a success. Among so great a body of students fitting, one for one profession, another for another, it would be impos...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
OUR EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 February 1879

OUR EXCHANGES. ONE of the best sporting- papers is the Forest and Stream, it always has interesting articles, and also a good deal of news about fishing, and shooting localities. " A short talk about canoeing," is very good, and some notes from the " Diary of some one's Grandmother's, Grandfather," are very interesting, showing as they do the manners, and customs of old gentlemen in 1762, while on country excursions, getting up at 2 A.M., and riding on horse back, from Philadelphia to Chester before breakfast. THE St. Nicholas comes to us as bright and spicy as usual, and sure to be enjoyed by the young folk, while some of the articles will interest older readers, " Eye Bright "by Susan Coolidge is begun in the February number, and promises to be a very lifelike and jolly little story. The Peterkins continue to do everything in the most round about way, possible, and the new adventures of Solomon John and Elizabeth Eliza are told in the regular Peterkin manner. " Teddy's Heroes," is...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SHAVINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 February 1879

SHAVINGS. THE latest thing we have heard in the way of New Year's Cards is an ordinary hair-pin stuck through a card over the words " New Year," " Hair-pi-n New Year." (Happy New Year.) PROF, in Elocution : That speech sounds familiar Mr. S , I think you have spoken it before. Mr. S : I never speak the same piece twice, sir Prof. : What, never? Mr. S : No, never. Prof. : What, never ? Mr. S : Well, hardly ever. There was a young fellow of Leicester, Who a beautiful damsel did pecester. But whether he addrecester, She called him a jeicester ; So he fled to the wilds of Wecestcheicester. WHAT does transatlantic mean, mamma?" "Across the Atlantic, child. Hold your tongue and ask no more questions." " Then does transparent mean a cross mamma ? " — Ex. MAID of Adams, ere we part, Tell me if thou hast a heart; For so padded is thy breast, I begin to doubt the rest. Tell me now before I go, Art thou all made up or no ? Are those tresses thickly twined, Only hair-pinned on behind ? Is thy b...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 February 1879

The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. IV. —1879. BOARD OF EDITORS : WILLIAM S. SLOAN, *Bl, Managing Editor. WILLIAM F. MORGAN, 'BO, Business Editor. WILLIAM H. TAYLOR, 'BO, WILLIAM B. MCVICKAR, 'BO, J. DUANE LIVINGSTON, 'BO, GEORGE H. TAYLOR, 'Bl, * FRANK L. HENRY, 'B2, WILLIAM K. OTIS, 'B2, C. D. STARR, 'Bl, S. of M., A. GERALD HULL, 'B2,- S. of M., REGINALD H. SAYRE, 'Bl, Secretary , C. E. CALDWELL, A. 8., S. ofL., * Resigned. NEW YORK: PRESS OF GILLISS BROTHERS. 1879. The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. IV. No. I. NEW YORK, FEBRUARY 15th, 1879. WHOLE NO. 29. Board of Editors, 1878-1879. HENRY G. PAINE, '79, Managing Edito?'. W. BARCLAY PARSONS, JR. '79. T. J. BRERETON, JR. '79. WILLIAM F. MORGAN, 'BO. WILLIAM H. TAYLOR, 'BO. REGINALD H. SAYRE, 'Bl. F. E. WARD, 'Bl, S. of M. C. D. STARR, 'Bl, S. of M. TERMS. Per annum, in advance, - $2.00. Single copies, - - - - - -15 cts. Remit...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CONTENTS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 February 1879

CONTENTS. The regular departments "About College," "School of Mines," "School of Law," "The College World," " The Library," " Our Exchanges," and " Shavings," are not indexed. Leading editorials are to be found in SMALL CAPITALS under. " Current Topics." PAGE A FATAL MISTAKE 5 ALUMNI NOTES 21, 60, 84 ALUMNI DINNER 41 BOATING NOTE 114 CANOEING 100 CARTOONS : Hints from 'B2 105 Introduction 19 Semi-Annual 7 Some Examination Papers 81 The Athletic Meeting . 57 The New Buildings 69 The Transit of Venus 45 Trinity College 33 Ye Sub-Freshmanne's Dreame 93 CHEMISTRY AT COLUMBIA 30 COLLEGE PRESS ON "AN I. C. P. A," 74 COMMENCEMENT 102 CORRESPONDENCE : An Appeal for Philolex 44 Announcement of Lit, Soc. Prizes 6 Class Supper of 'Bl 43 Cloak Rooms in New Buildings 5 Concerning the Campus 16 Earlier Issuing of the Annuals . 78 Eighty-One's Class Boat 6 English at Columbia 77 Exchanges in the Library 55 Exchanges on File 17 Gymnasium 31 Literary Societies 55 Mistake Corrected 6 New Bulletin Boa...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CURRENT TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 February 1879

CURRENT TOPICS. THIS number of the SPECTATOR, the first of volume IV, inaugurates a new feature in Columbia journalism, namely the insertion of a full page cartoon in each issue. It has been the wish of the editors for some time to add this new attraction to the SPECTATOR, and now, thanks to the energy of its financial managers, it has been placed upon so firm a basis, that they no longer feel any hesitation in starting this somewhat expensive improvement. The editors have no fear of the illustrations not proving acceptable to the students, The largely increased subscription lists and the acknowledged ability of its artists assure them on this score. As the work of illustrating each number is too much for a single student to attend to, the editors will from time to time avail themselves of the services already kindly volunteered by several students and graduates of Columbia. In the last number of the Acta appeared an editorial explaining why it did not illustrate. We shall only hope...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SEMI-ANNUAL. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 February 1879

SEMI-ANNUAL. THE class of '79 were fortunate in having a pleasant night for their Semi-Annual. Last year the weather was as unpleasant as it well could be, but on the evening of the 7th the moon shone clear in the sky, and the cool wind had rendered the walking very good by drying up the slush, which, during the middle of the day, made the streets very disagreeable to cross. The attendance was about the same as last year, and the large number of young ladies gave the Academy a most cheerful appearance. The box of our President, which was vacant through his illness, which had confined him to the house for some days, made a blank in the otherwise well-filled proscenium, in one of which especially there was a most lively gathering. The faculty was represented by a single professor, and the absence of the President was much to be regretted. There was not as much dancing as in former years, and more attention was paid to the speeches than usual. In the absence of Mr. Kellogg, the senior ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
A TALE OF WOOD'S. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 February 1879

A TALE OF WOOD'S. HE was a gallant student who At exams, ne'er did quail, But he was most exceeding fresh, The subject of thij tale. Committee men came up to him, (They are the freshman's curse), They vampire-like pursued him, Then sued him for his purse. He paid his V, raised up his hand, And swore by 'B2, Since for the shell he had shelled out He'd row upon the crew. That he must practice up and train He fullwell understood, And since the water frozen was, He straightway went to Wood. Then Captain Eldredge spoke to him, And said, " I'll tell you now That a stern duty rests on him Who pulleth in the bow." " Oh, that's all right," the youth replied, " I'm much obliged to you, And if the bow's too much for me, Then I'll pull number two." He sat him down at a machine And gave a fearful pull, When suddenly the scull hew up And hit him on the skull. jfc jJC SJC His sorrowing friends came forward then And picked him from the floor, Dropping a tear to think, alas ! His rowing days were o'...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
ONLY A VASSAR GIRL. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 February 1879

ONLY A VASSAR GIRL. BY CORNICULA. (A Tale of Moonshine, Mystery, and Misery.) CHAPTER 111. " I wish to examine into this, whether we are ourselves, or else some other persons." (Plautus. —Miles Gloriosus.) THE last chapter left me fainted away in Professor Dayle's arms. The moment I heard Tom cry, " Villain ! —my child !" a fearful fear smote me that he was playing his part too well; so, before he had taken ten strides, with a sigh 1 recovered, and tottered towards him. " Stay, father. What do you mean ? Professor has caught me, or I might have broken my head when I fainted." The professor looked volumes of thankfulness to me for moderating my father's wrath, and said nothing. The disposition of characters is as follows : I K A (Figure on the left is Professor Dayle, immovable and speechless. On the right, Tom, pausing in his terrible stride before my supplicating arms.) Then followed a series of explanations satisfactory to every- one, and the act, at first so tragic, assumes more ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
A FATAL MISTAKE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 February 1879

A FATAL MISTAKE. IT was Chesterfield who uttered the sentiment, lately repeated in Punch, " that it is the hat and not the coat that makes the man." This may be regarded either as a moral, or as a proposition to be demonstrated inductively. Hicks is a freshman. Aiken is a senior. Hicks, who is somewhat of a sport, lately got hold of some tickets for a meeting of the Society for the Suppression of Vice. Expecting to hear some spicy revelations, he determined to attend. Alas ! on one corner of the tickets were the words, " Youths not admitted." This forbidding sentence only served the more to inflame his curiosity. Still, he could not but feel that he came under the prohibited category. In this case he came to his friend Aiken and explained matters. " There need be no difficulty," said Aiken, when he had learned all the particulars. " I will go with you, and being a senior and wearing side-whiskers, they will probably take me for your father, and will not on that account dare to keep ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CORRESPONDENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 February 1879

CORRESPONDENCE. Eds. of the Spectator : AMONG the improvements effected by the new buildings is, that hereafter we will have two cloak-rooms in place of one. This has of course become necessary 011 account of the numbers of the freshman classes of the last year or so. There will undoubtedly have to be some fixed number for each room and I would like to suggest the following division : let one cloak-room be used only by the junior and senior classes and the other by the two remaining, the sophomore and freshman. This would undoubtedly be a great help to class feeling, and would add a great deal of pleasure to the Burial as the sophomores would not only burn their tormentor but celebrate their leaving the under-classmen's cloak-room. My letter is short, but I hope to the point. SUGGESTION. Mr. Spectator:— HAVING noticed your invitation for correspondence and how freely it has been accepted, in conjunction with several others I would like to hear from you in the next number of this pap...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SPORTING COLUMN. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 February 1879

SPORTING COLUMN. Athletics. WE would suggest to the Athletic Association the propriety of introducing a two mile bicycle race in the Spring games. It would undoubtedly prove a great attraction to parties both in and out of the College. There are several students in Columbia who own bicycles and would undoubtedly enter. If the matter was talked up, doubtless others would be desirous to compete. This sport is very popular in England and is being slowly introduced into this country. We commend the matter to the attention of the Athletic Association and hope they will take some action upon it. HARVARD : The winter meeting of the H. A. A. in the gymnasium will include the following events : Vaulting, one hand ; Vaulting, two hands ; Horizontal Bar; Indian Club Swinging; Standing High Jump; Light, Middle, and Heavy Weight Wrestling ; Light, Middle, and Heavy Weight Sparring ; Fencing ; Broadsword Exercises ; and Tugs of War. N. Y. A. C. : This club has announced its Second Annual Assault-...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
ABOUT COLLEGE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 February 1879

ABOUT COLLEGE. VERY few changes in the new schemes. THE hand-books have been distributed to the students, and are very interesting. Now is the time to see the "Pinafore." Freshmen half price. F. BENEDICT FIERZOG entered the sophomore class at the late examinations. THE sophomores will soon hold their Semi-Annual elections for class officers. We refer the freshmen to a clipping from a Princeton paper, in the department "College World." WHAT do you think of Mr. Week's attempt at a whistle? Prof. says it is a pretty weak squeal. THERE is a mysterious report going the rounds that some did not " crib with enough care," in the intermediate. THE Semi-Annual collection committees report a few delinquents who have not yet paid the money they promised to CRANE, 'BI, who has been sick for some weeks, fortunately recovered in time to represent his class at Semi-Annual. THE juniors now have the pleasure of seeing a lady attend the lectures of Prof. Rood, on the subject of " Specific Heat." PRESI...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
School of Mines. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 February 1879

School of Mines. IN the examination at which the highest mark is more sought than perhaps at any other of the course, viz : the semi-annual in mathematics of the first year, the maximum obtained was 9.9., earned by the papers of C. L. Fitch and A. J. Moses. MR. DAGUERRE has been furnished with a frame to which might be applied the words of a famous monkey when he contemplated his sky-blue tail. WE are requested to state that if a certain gentleman of the third year does not desist from the disgraceful practice of walking down Fifth Avenue in the afternoon with a stump of a pipe in his mouth, class action (not to say University action) will be taken in the matter. THE editors of the Miner are progressing bravely with their work and laughed us to scorn when we modestly enquired as to the excellence of their production compared to the issue of last year. The volume of this year will be some ten pages more in quantity and inexpressibly more in quality. At least, that is what the editors...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
COLLEGE WORLD. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 February 1879

COLLEGE WORLD. Cornell: — Several members of the junior and senior classes have been suspended for cheating in the late term examinations. The sophomores have appointed a committee to purchase a suitable flag to be presented to the winning crew at Ensenore. The Era is becoming anxious about the fact that President White has not yet delivered his annual address to the university students. The same paper says : " It has been proposed to unite several of our New York State college base-ball associations into a league, and steps have been already taken for the accomplishment of this end." The junior class, after a stormy meeting, decided, by means of the casting vote of the President, to give a ball to the seniors sometime during the winter or spring term. Their class supper is to be on February 2 I St. Dartmouth: — Complaints have been made in the Dartmouth about the lack of ventilation in the lec-ture-rooms. The nine are hard at work and have greatly im proved since they went into tra...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
OUR EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 February 1879

OUR EXCHANGES. THE Sportsman is quite good as an athletic paper, though we think that in other departments it does not carry out its title as well as could be wished. THE Yale Lit . comes to us for the first time, and has created a pleasant impression, in spite of the rather lugubrious appearance of the cover. An article called "Social Environments" is very good, and contains a number of very true opinions. Of the remaining prose selections, we liked " Two Spanish Students " and "Difficulties of a Pessimist," best. The poetry is very good. " Les Separes " and " El Rey de la Mar," pleasing us most. We have only a few of No. 7 left, but shall be glad to comply with the Lit's request, if we find it possible to do so. THE University Herald is also a new arrival, of whom we had heard through the columns of its sister paper, the Syracusan. In its literary department we find " TdMhXkovra," along and mournful attempt at witticism, in which the writer has not succeeded. A man who "guesses," ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 March 1879

The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. IV. No. 11. NEW YORK, MARCH Ist, 1879. WHOLE NO. 31. Board of Editors, 1879-1880. WILLIAM S. SLOAN, 'Bl, Managing Editor. WILLIAM F. MORGAN, 'BO, Business Editor. WILLIAM H. TAYLOR, 'BO. WILLIAM B. MCVICKAR, 'BO. REGINALD H. SAYRE, 'Bl. GEORGE H. TAYLOR, 'Bl. FRANK L. HENRY, 'B2. C. E. CALDWELL, B. A., S. of L. C. D. STARR, 'Bl, S. of M. A. GERALD HULL, 'B2, S. of M. TERMS. Per annum, (18 numbers.) in advance, - $2.00. Single copies, - - - - - - 1 5 cts - Remittances by mail should be addressed to WILLIAM K. OTIS, 'B2, Treasurer, No. 108 West 34th Street, N. Y. Exchanges, contributions, and all other communications should be addressed to THE COLUMBIA SPECTATOR, Columbia College, N. Y.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CURRENT TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 March 1879

CURRENT TOPICS. WITH this number of THE SPECTATOR a new corps of editors take up the literary mantle that has fallen from the shoulders of the old board. While not desiring to enter into any elaborate statement of policy, it is deemed wise to say that the aim and idea of the editors is to issue a college newspaper, which will be a representative one of the whole of Columbia, and not of any particular department or class. The old board have instituted great improvements, and, while endeavoring to carry these out, we will make, at suitable times, such additional ones as may seem best. There is one thing we would ask from the students—that they will aid us by literary contributions, as well as by their financial support. With the hope that this request will be granted, we enter the coming year by presenting this number of THE SPECTATOR before the college public. THE Law School, which of necessity has been omitted from the last four numbers, again takes its place as a permanent feature....

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
IN MEMORIAM. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 March 1879

IN MEMORIAM. FOR the fourth time, in two years, we are called upon to announce the death of one of our trustees. The Rev. BENJAMIN I. HAIGHT, upon whom had been conferred both the degrees of Doctor of Divinity and of Laws and Literature, died late on the evening of February 21st, at his residence in West Twentysixth Street. He had been an assistant minister of Trinity Parish for nearly a quarter-century, and a trustee of Columbia College thirty-five years. He graduated from Columbia in the class of '2B, and after passing through the Theological Seminary, became Rector of St. Peter's Church, which was organized for him. In 1834 he resigned that position, to accept a call from St. Paul's Church, in Cincinnati, but not liking to live out of New York, in 1837 he returned to the metropolis. Then, accepting the position of Rector of All Saints' Parish, in the Seventh Ward, he retained that place until 1847. At the same time he was Professor of Pastoral Theology in his Alma Mater seminary....

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
ONLY A VASSAR GIRL. (A Tale of Moonshine, Mystery, and Misery.) [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 March 1879

ONLY A VASSAR GIRL. (A Tale of Moonshine, Mystery, and Misery.) BY CORNICULA. CHAPTER V. I KNOW not what chance brought Tom just at the instant that I was about to disclose what I was and my love for Maud, but afterwards I realized how opportune it was, and how*! had been saved from incurring the enmity of the sweet girl. What would have been the result? Maud, forgetting entirely that I had saved her life, when the great deception became known, would have fled from my presence, never to return again with the old friendship, and henceforth, if not an open denunciation, secret hatred towards me for playing a false part would have been my portion It was well that the revelation had not come yet. About this time a freshman, younger than myself, and of a confiding disposition, formed quite an attachment for me, although I paid little attention to her. One afternoon, on my way home, I seated myself by a rustic arbor far out near the limits of the college grounds. The sound of a pebbly bro...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
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