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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 101 cated man. The true spirit of the Christian school influences and directs the moral character of every act and helps to purify every thought of the Christian scholar ; it is ever favorable to the practice of refined and gentle manly manners, and never fails to cre ate a noble and fearless heart. It is the safeguard of Christian scholarship and the most valuable acquirement of tho Christian scholar, whose soul breathes a healthy moral atmosphere and possesses the courage to meo. with magnanimity the trials and difficulties that beset life's path Witness the up right demeanor and noble self-possession of the truly Christian-educated young man The inordinate pleasures of the world have no charms for him, and its many reverses no terrors. Fail ure is no failure for him it is enough for him to know that his object was good, and his purpose in acting high and noble. In whatever rank or sta tion of life you may find him, strong, earnest and well-directed will power...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

"T rf mmmmmrtes- 108 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. candor and purity of life and acts have left us foot prints all along the royal path of life, men, in truth to say, whose lives add luster to the Christian world and clearly demonstrated the superior excellence of Christian education. Alexis L. Miller. QUEER FUNERAL CUSTOMS. How the ITorth Americx Indians Put Their Dead in the Earth Strang Observa tions from the Death Bed to the Grave. Belief About the Hereafter. From tho Journal of American Folk-Loro. Relatives give vent to their grief in loud wails when one is in the dying agony. The crying continues at inter vals until death .takes place, and also up to the time of burial. This cry has been by some white persons mistaken for a song or chant, but it in no way partakes of that character; it is a gen uine expression of anguish and grief. The wail or cry is interspersed with terms which express the relationship between the deceased and the person grieving. The writer has many times heard the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 10S cioty dies, the body is taken immed iately after death, while it is yet limber to the place where the society is ac customed to meet. On its arrival it is placed in a sitting posture, facing the east, and decked with the regalia of the society. The face of tho corpse is painted in tho manner in which the man while living was accustomed to paint when attending the meetings of the society. In his right hand is placed the "Ta-sha-gio," or deer's hoof rattle, which is carried only by the leader of the society. When all is com plete the crier summons the members, and these wend their way to tho place where tho dead man sits as a silent host. The Mawadano songs which were the favorites of the dead member are then sung and the rythmic steps taken, while presents are laid on the drum; these latter are offerings toward the funeral ceremonies. As each gift is made the crier sings forth the name of the giver, that all the village may hear of the deed. While the body li...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

55SS5J WfWfWOT mpw'J-wV"3 r,v f 104- THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. lowed by the crowd wailing as they walk. When the grave is reached the relatives gather around the opening, the corpse is lifted from the litter and held by the bearers while the robes on which it sat are arranged for its recep tion in the grave, where it is placed upon them, facing the east, and the articles of value, chiefly ornaments worn bjr the person during life, are de posited beside the body. If the de ceased be a man, his weapons are laid by his side; if a woman, her sewing bag, containing her awl, quills, and articles used for embroidery; if a child, its plaything are placed beside it. At the burial of a warrior his favorite horse is decorated as his master was wont to paint the animal, this painting being always in accordance with the man's visions. After the corpse is de posited in the grave, a rawhide rope is loosely tied about the neck of the horse, and two men take hold of each end of the rope and draw it taut ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

ifPKJPuBfPfivifpiMIPVPfMWP1 L! piffwiiylpipipvu'w.wiiP'w k unnipjnni imwmptpmii THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 106 cept Protestants arc " sectarian." This is " real nice " as a public fraud. The church members of all the Protestant sects in the world do not number near ly one-fourth of the Christian church members of the world, but these loss the one-fourth are "non-sectarian," the over three-fourths are "sectarian" according to those would-be tyrants. "Soct" means "cut off," and the mi nority would "cut off" the majority from whom they sprang. "Real nice" as a gross deceit. And the Protest ant sects were the bodies that established religious government Indian schools under President Grant, but when they found iho Indians could not be Pro testantized of their free will, they pro tested against "sectarian schools" so that they could, as we see, compel the Indians into some kind of Protestant sectarianism. Is Protestantism amen able to common public decency? Autumn. IJY A SISTEK Or MEHCY. Autum...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

'""J ?' J-S'V'-T ."Sj. ",j5,5rngj1 "$' T .700 SPHE INDIAN ADVOCATE. fyRrvva her holy guardian angel Wherever she went he accompanied her in a wonder ful halo of light. His place was always at her right hand, and every time she attempted to look at him she seemed to be gazing at the mid-day sun. When ever she prayed, or whenever tempta tion assailed her, lie acted towards her the part of a friendly powerful pro tector. This remarkable apparition she described to her father confessor in the following words: "1 was always en veloped in such a halo of light, that, at any hour of the night, I could read as easily as in the daytime. The angel always kept his face turned toward Heaven. His appearance was that of a young boy, his hands folded on his breast, his hair a bright auburn, falling in graceful clusters upon his shoulders. His garments would at times be whiter than snow, and at other times of a purple-glowing color. These robes flowed gracefully down on his ankles. His feet were unc...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 107 country, and are also taught to read and write, and they are taught arithmetic; the teachers say that they are really in telligent when one remembers how lit tle opportunity for education has ever been given to the natives of Alaska. A Queer Indian Festival. This year, when such a fierce and suc cessful war has been made on our Indian contract schools, I think your readers may welcome a short description of the beautiful Corpus Christi celebration at Keshena, Wisconsin, in the Menominee reservation. The place is far away from busy cities, near the romantic Wolf River, about oight miles from Shawano. It is as if the Almighty had fixed the lino of the procession especially for that purpose, for there is a beautiful ridge about eight hundred feet from the river running along for half a mile. The Rt. Rev. Bishop of Green Bay, who always makes it a point to be pres ent on that day, is received by the In dian cornet band, and one hundred riders on Indian ponies fo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

- T",,,vm'pfr'Ti5'---y-'"pvt'11 i08 the Indian advocate. Ifye Idiaij SdVocatc Ie a Quarterly Review, published by the Benedictine Fathers of the Indian Tor., to plead tho cause of the last remnants of Indian tribes, and to give a history of their progress toward civilization. It will contain, from timo to time, a general history of each tribe ; their progress in education and religion ; their occupa tions, industries, schools, etc., etc. Also, a history of our mis sions, statistics, and other interesting matter that can not be found in any other publication. Tho proceeds of this Review will be used for educating and converting tho Indians of the Territory. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, Sacred Heart P. 0 , Okla. Ter. Approved by Right Rkv. THEO. MEERSCHAERT, Vicar Apostolic of Oklahoma and Indian Territory. A Quarterly Roviow, ontorod at tho Sacred Heart Post OlMco in Oklahoma Territorj, as mcoih1 clas matter. Subscriptions 60 Cents per Year. Single Copies 15 Cents OCTOBER, 189G. Editorial an...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 109 There are about 32,000 Indians in the Prefecture-Apostolic of the Alaska Ter ritory, of whom 785 are Catholics. Ton Jesuit Fathers have charge of the six churches and two schools. Rev. Hippolyte Topet, O. S. B. The above cut represents the Rev. IT. Topet, O.S.B., pastor of Lehigh-Colgate and Missionary Apostolic of Atoko , Bogy Depot, Caddo, Durant, and all the south ern part of the Choctaw Nation. Truly the gentleman is always in motion, but then he is working for God in the Choc taw Nation. St. Augustine's Benedictine priory at Ramsgate (England) has been made an abbey by the Pope, being the first Eng lish abbey of the black Benedictines since the so-called Reformation. The new Abbot has the old title of Abbot of St. Augustine's, Canterbury. &, Uf I Mgr. SHephan, the veteran head of the Catholic Indian Bureau, says that he anticipates no great falling off in the Catholic schools for Indians on account of the withdrawal of government sup port. Catholics...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

rvtVFvmRflFqrWI H WW wr: pfi" -?Tf rrfKnmrritfr- " "rv- r-w vpgw yyt- "n99m. 110 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. The Indian Commissioner stated a few months ago that it would cost $1, 200,000 to provide public school build ings for the accommodation of the In dian children now being educated in the contract schools. Congress, at the instigation of the A. P. A., having voted the abolition of the contract schools next year, the taxpayers of the country will have to pay in one lump this enor mous tribute to the idol of secularism, besides having the regular annual cost of the Indian schools doubled or trebled. One would suppose that the citizens of the United States would be anxious in these times to mitigate their burdens instead of adding to them; but it seems that they would prefer to pay a few ex tra millions of dollars to boodlers and let the Indians revert to their primitive savagery rather than to have them made good citizens and good Christians at the same time. It does seem so, but it is...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

TBE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Ill There is no personal grudge against the wheel in me beyond that I have not got one. The reason I have not is akin to the one which kept the fox from get ting the grapes. Nevertheless there are times when I think the wheel is odious; that is, after I have listened to the thir teenth man describe himself as a "new" beginner. Now, could anybody possi bly be an "old" beginner? I wish the society for the prevention of cruelty would look into this matter! In this issue we give, by request, some appreciations on the monetary question. Persons who wish to inform themselves more thoroughly on the money ques tion now so much mooted would do well to study "Bimetallism and Monometal lism," by Most Rev. Dr. Walsh, Arch bishop of Dublin. It is published by the Coin Publishing company, Chicago, and sells for 25 cents. The Church is making great progress in Japan, a result duo in great part to the labors of the zealous French mis sionaries now preaching the Gospel there. Th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

-'WJP'h'TT,7"!i "WiW- m'"wJit$miwWTPWWs'jpR vrwmxwvprf&N!ir'i i ;n wirsytr' ? m TffE INDIAN ADVOCATE. An hour later a courageous mission ary lifts up the chalice of salvation on the ice-bound coast of Greenland. At half-past four the sacred lamps twinkle through the fogs of Newfound land; and at five, Nova Scotia's indus trious population begins the day by at tending Mass. And now all the Canadian churches and chapels grow radiant, as the faith ful people, the habitant of the country, the devout citizen, the consecrated nun and the innocent, hasten to unite their prayers around the sanctuary where the priest is awaiting them. At six, how many souls are flocking to the churches of New York, eager to begin the day of labor with the holiest act of religion. Many young people, too, gather around the altar there at a later hour, like the fresh flowers which open with the morning and offer their dewy fragrance to heaven. An hour later the bells of Missouri and Louisiana are ringing; a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

y"WPfiiirrTt'Ti mmmmmmmm wjwwotkib ' THE INDIAN ADVOCATE 118 HON. WILLIAM JENNINGS JlItYAN Was born at Salem, 111., March 19, 1860. His father, Silas L. Bryan, was an able lawyer, a State Senator and Cir cuit Judge. William J. Bryan was raised on a farm. He was taught at home until ten years of age, attended public school for a few years, and at the ago of fifteen entered Whipple Academy at Salem, 111. A few years later he graduated from the Illinois College at Jackson ville. Pie was admitted to the bar in 1883, after taking his dogree at Union College, Chicago. In 1887 he moved to Lincoln, Nebraska, and was elected to Congress in 1890 and also in 1892. He is a brilliant orator, and an earnest advocato of " Free Silver." He was nominated for President by the Demo crats at Chicago, and by the Populists at St. Louis at their conventions last month. If elected, he will be the youngest man that ever occupied the Presidential chair, and the first one elected from a state west of the Miss...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

'""r '"-Vpwypptir?- lWjHl)fF,';"' ii TH INDIAN ADVOCATE. MONETARY QUESTIONS. Would Free Silver Swamp us with the White Metal? Would it drive out Gold? Is it true, asks a correspondent, that in case we have free and unlimited coinage of silver European nations will send all their silver here and sink us under an avalanche of that metal? No, it is not true. Unless, on the hypothesis that the people of those na tions are about to become lunatics or idiots. The report of the Director of the Mint, dated June 24, 1894, shows that the world's production of silver for 1893, rated at 16 to 1, amounted to $208,371, 000. Of this amount Europe produced but $19,155,000. The amount now being consumed by Europe, for coinage purposes alone averages about $32,000,000 annually. Add to this the amount consumed by her in the arts, and it will be found that instead of having silver to sell, she annually consumes more than double the amount of silver that she produces. Now, as Europe annually consumes mo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 116 more than tho miller pays for all the wheat ho grinds. Tho latter grinds all tho wheat that conies to his mill, hik ing out tho toll as he grinds. That is what tho Government would do at the mints. Rev. Dr. Lambert, in the N. Y. Freeman's Journal. I Long to Serve My Land. BY KEV. WM. J. m'OLUKE. I care not to bo high or great In martial deeds of fame, Nor yet where statesmen congregate To win a deathless name. 'Twas never my desire to bo By fortune's fair winds fanned ; Enough this simple wish for mo ; I long to serve my land. It matters not the how or where, In exile or at home, "Within my native village fair Or far beyond tho foam, If but the friends, some future day, Who round my tomb may stand Can read that, in his humble way, He loved and served his land. The Vase of Soissons. At the beginning of the fifth cen tury, when Attila, tho "Sourge of God," and his Tartar followers wore devastat ing Southern Europe, and the Northern nations wore founding rude b...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

116 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. allow any man to rule them as Theo doric ruled the Visigoths, or Attila the Huns; and thus, while the other na tions were settling down into compara tive civilization, building cities, and practicing rude husbandry with prim itive implements, the Franks were still a savage race of marauders, living by plunder and robbery. Under Clovis, the aspect of the na tion changed entirely. This remark able man contrived to obtain a com plete ascendancy over the Franks; to be a king not only in name but in deed to preserve during the days of peace the authority his predecessors had only enjoyed in time of war. When he first commenced his conquests in 4S1, the Franks were a wandering tribe, plund ering the towns and villages of the more peaceful inhabitants of Gaul. At his death, in 511, he left among his sons an empire larger in extent than the present France, containing a Christian population rude, indeed, and warlike but no longer dwellers in tents and vagabonds on th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

m' iiff"f' ' '( wm THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 117 'yjii,,pppitW) wo slaves that we must yield up the spoils of our swords and spears at a king's behest! Thou shalt have noth ing," ho contined, turning upon Clovis, " but thy share, as apportioned to thee by fate. If tho priest must needs have his baublo, let him take it, with the mark of a Frank thereon. " And, rais ing his axe, he discharged a mighty blow upon the vase, crushing its beau tiful proportions into shapless de formity. Tho eye of the Frankish king gleamed darkly, but ho spoke never a word. Turning to the circle of warriors around him, he thanked them calmly for grant ing his request; then he gave the muti lated vase into the hands of the affrighted priest, who stood ready to bear away the precious relic. Then the business of apportioning the spoils commenced; and not by word or gest ure did the king reveal the deep anger that was tearing his heart, as the fabled vulture is described tearing the vitals of Prometheus. Months rol...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

118 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. on July 1st, 1897, to receive Govern ment support and "undenominational schools" will take their place. With all that has been written on the subject of the Indian contract schools, very few, even among the Catholic pop ulation, understand the true history and significance of the controversy. The facts seem to be these. During the administration of General Grant, which was notoriously controlled by the Methodist parsons, the latter discovered that most of the Christian Indians of the country were Catholics, and that Catholicity was continuing to spread rapidly among the aborigines the orig inal and only true native-Americans, by the way. In order to remedy this state of affairs, and in order to accomplish by foul means what energy and self sacrifice had been lacking to accomplish by fair ones, it was decided in the con venticles of heresy that the Govern ment should assume entire control of the Indian Education, and place the Catholic missions, so far as pos...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 119 grants to denominational schools must bo withdrawn. NOW WHAT DOES THIS MKAN ? It moans that the Indians are to be as far as possible, placed under the tutorship of ignorant hirelings, who will fleece and rob and corrupt them at their own pleasure, as multitudes of Protestant Indian agents have been doing wherever they were free from the vigilance of noble and God-fearing men and women all of the Catholic com munion, who made the Indians the objects of their jealous solicitude, and took care to report to Washington all cases of gross abuse of power by un scrupulous officials. It also means that while the efficiency of the Indian schools is to be decreased ninety per cent, the cost of maintain ing them is to be multiplied ten-fold. The Apaists have had their fling, and now, gentlemen, you may step up and pay the fiddler. But do the Protestants prefer to save the Indians destroyed body and soul and assume a new load of taxation to boot, rathar than have them in...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

r no THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Republicans Chandler, Clark, Crown, Dubois, Gallinger, Lodge, Mit chell of Oregon, Morrill, Piatt, Quay, Sewell, Toller, Warren and Wilson. Democrats George. Populists But ler and Peffor. Church Progress. THEIR SUN AND WAR DANCES. The morning of the glorious Fourth dawned here amid a grand pamorama of whooping Indians, neighing ponies and yelping dogs. He who missed this cele bration of the day missed a wild and picturesque conglomeration of sights and sounds which may never be the lot of man to survey again. The days of the Sioux in his pristine glory, are rapidly on the wane, and it is the opin ion of those familiar with such expedi tions that this will end these affairs in this locality. Many say it will be impossible ever again to mass the throngs of untutored children of the plain that are here to-day. There are 5,000 of them Brules, Ogalallas and Cheyennes and at their head is that historical old patriarch of the toma hawk and scalping knife, Red Clou...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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