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Title: Great Falls Tribune Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 1,630 items from Great Falls Tribune, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 8 January 1887

GREAT FALLS TRIBUNE. WEEKLY TRIBUNE, im"em armY LA7UDAY NY THE TIIBIII PUBLISHIlG COIPATY, WILL HIANKS, President. iH. O. CHOWEN. Vice-Pres. C. Mf. WEBSTER, Sec. aned Treas. &ADYRTIBING RATES FURNISHED ON AP PLICAIONW. SUBSCRIPTION RATES Oae.py 1 year, (i advance) ............... $.00 Olseeopy 6 menths,......................... 1.50 1One copy & menths........................... 1.00 Spetaa sopiea ......................... 10 Atcietl iyn advance. 'oe aDcalaton of the TRIBU N in Northern Metaaa is guasnteed to exceed that of any pa ps. published in the territory. Sabscrlbera desiring their address changed mst send their former address; this should be smembered. Address, TnInU.x PUBLISitwN Co. SATURDAY, JAN. 8, 1887. THE ST. Loris train robbers have been arrested, summarily convicted and sentenced. EARTHQUAKES continue at Charles ton. People in that vicinity are be coming discouraged. TiHE U. S. SIGNAL SERVICE station r.t Benton has been abandoned and removed to Ft. Assinaboine...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 8 January 1887

I HARRI31 Christmas & Now ear'sGreeting That time of the year is now at hand when one FuruisiiGOOdS and all of us lay aside all past quarrels and think B ots and Slis of some peace offering to be given to those we in this line of goods I am thing most of; such offerings I am now showing, ou will find this stock ta be showing . consisting of Handkerchiefs, fine and well selected, and at Collars & Cuffs,s, N0bby Suits, Overcoats & Blanketsll Suspenders, VVI Uthat HARRIS deserves the Slippers, E& name of selling goods cheap. STONE BLOK, rice HARRIS THE OLOTHIER GREAT FALLS. •E Dealing GREAT FALLS. THAT CLOCI(. Written for the Tribune by YI. I. TIS. "It's no use talking, we've got to have a clock." So said Nick Weaver, or "Old Nick" as he was called in Summit Camp, one of the many mining camps in the mountains of Colorado. His partner, Billy Brown, to whom this decisive orinion was expressed was Nick's junior by at least twenty-five or six years, being at the time not mu...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 8 January 1887

ART EXTRAORDINARY. Where Tattooed People in the Amrn seums Come from. [Boston Globe.] 'Turn asoend. Jim, and let them see the Crneifision." Two men, seated on chairs, sat facing each other in a room on North street. One of them was dressed in a navy uni form. His name was Elmer E. Getchell. The other was a Poston citi zen named James Burke, and he was dressed in a light and airy costume of a pair of trunks. There was nothing more upon him in the way of clothing, but he had more decoration on his body than any man in the state. He was tattooed from his neck down to his toe-nails, with all kinds of figures of men, beasts, flowers, ships and shapes of every kind. fis thighs were covered with idols. etc., placed there when he was in Bur mah, eight years ago. All the rest of the work was new and has been put on within a few weeks by Mr. (letchell. The figures were blue and red, a:d the various figures sere drawn in a skillful and artistic style. &-s the tattooed man turned around, hi...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 8 January 1887

AMERICAN ILLIBERALISM. Written for the Tribune: Glancing thoughtfully over the mani fold manifestations of public sentiment that everywhere surround us, we are im pressed by the strong and unmistakable tendency of the American people toward illiberalism. One hundred years or more have passed over the dial of our national history, each in its turn has brought its labors, trials and changes, during their long and eventful course. Political parties have risen, flourished and vanished, wars of defense and conquest have taken their blood and given their recompense, secess ion and rebellion have come with cruel desolation and left the Union bleeding and faint, the few and scattered colonists of independence fame have multiplied to a swarming nation of sixty millions, the .narrowed territory of colonial times has grown and broadened to an extensive con tinent bounded but by the icy north and the burning south, yet through all these trials and troubles, labors and triumphs, through all thes...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 8 January 1887

GREAT FALLS, MONTANA. `GREAT FALLS is located at the Falls of the Missouri which furnish the greatest available water power on the Continent. Is within seven miles of the most extensive COAL and I RON district in the West, immediately beyond which are rich GOLD, SILVER and COPPER districts. It lays tributary the best agricultural and grazing part of the Territory, and the pineries of the Upper Missouri and tributaries. It is especially adapted by its natural resources and geographical position to become the leading MANUFACTURING CITY between Minneapolis and the Pacific, and the principal RAILROAD CENTER of Montana. The trip to Great Falls will amply repay tourists by the beauty of the scenery on the way, and they will find here the most magnificent series of waterfalls in the world, while the surrounding country is rich in picturesqe scenery. For further information address H. O. C)HOWEN, Agent. SPRAY OF THE FALLS. A Knights of Pythias lodge will soon be organized here. Prof. Mortso...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 15 January 1887

VIOLEI GREIAT FALLS TRIBUN E,. VOL. 2. GREAT FALLS, MONTANA TERRITORY, SATURDAY, JANUARY 15, I887, NO 35 LEWIS AND CLARKE. With no apology for begining abruptly with the great explorers at the headwaters of the Missouri, we read that the South East fork they called Gallatin's river in honor of the secretary of the treasury. In honor of- President Jefferson the south west branch was named, while the middle one was christened Madison. "These two as well as the Gallatin, run with great ve locity and throw out large bodies of water. Gallatin river is however, the most rapid of the three, and though not quite as deep, is yet navigable for s considerable dis tance. The beds of all of them are form ed of smooth pebble and gravel, and the waters are perfectly transparent. Correct ly deciding that the Jefferson branch to the southwest would bring them nearest to the head of the Columbia river they took their weary way up that winding, swift and broken stream, and after many adven tures arriv...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 15 January 1887

IMI TATION OYSTERS. r Traveler's Tale of Oyster Faetelrle in Paris. [New York Sun.] "The most singular thing that I as* in Paris," said a gentleman just ru turned from Europe, "was artificial oysters; not what you call mock oysters, that is, meat done up in a patty or a ]potpie, but an imitation of the real bivalve and fit to serve raw. And as gar as their looks go, ou would say at once that they were genuine American oysters, but when you came to eatone the difference would be perceptible at once. How they are made and what is used in their manu facture is a mystery I did not solve, but it is certain that a great deal of mnoney is made by the producers. The usual price is 5 cents each, and some times in the second-class eating houses they are to be had for 3 cents, though they are not apt to be fresh at that price. You order a plate on the ha'f shell, and when the waiter brings them to you they look just as nice as those you get in the best New York places. If you are not a good ju...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 15 January 1887

AMERICAN ILLIBERALISM. Written for the Tribune: (Continued from last week.) But if he appreciates not the value of liberty, improves not the golden opportu nity that lies before him, and falls behind in the advancing rank of civilization he has no one to blame but himself. Then let us give the negro a chance, let him enjoy those privileges which we claim for our selves, untrammelled by prejudice and free from envy and scorn. Upon the cor .ner-stone of the American Constitution our forefathers cut the precious principle "Equality of Rights,"-a principle that the experience of years has taught in many a hard learned lesson to be the foundation rock of every free and ilberal government, the basis of all progress and advancing .civilization. Let us cerry out in deed and fact, let us give life and meaning to this noble precept of our fathers and' thus prove ourselves true to a principle that has l)een won for us and our posterity by the countless hardships and untold sacrifices of years ...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 15 January 1887

GREAT FALLS TRIBUNE. WEEKLY TRIBUNE, MM lMMD Y 5kI NBDAY E TE TIIBI.UE PUBLISHING COMPANY, LEsaroaoo .] e WILL IL4ANKS, President. H. 0. i CIOWEN, Vice-Pres. r C. M.M. WEBSTE' , Sec. an/ Treas. I AIYVERTIBING RATES FURNISHED ON AP. e PLICA'12ON. t SUBSCRIPTION RATES- ( Oasopyr 1 year, (is advance) .............. $3.00 O esopy I m enths,.......................... 1.50 O • copy months........................... 1.00 8peima sopies......................... 1 triety ia ad vanse. The ebculaton of the TRIBUs in Northern Msitsaa is guarnteed to exceed that of any pa pew published in the territory. c absecribers desiring their address changed t mut send their former address; this should be samembered. Address, TRIBUNE PUnLrsaiNO Co. SATURDAY, JAN. 8, 1887. THE house has passed a bill creating a national department of agriculture and labor. JOHN ROACSH, the great ship builder has g seiled away beyond the horizon into the Great Unknown. THE Mikado was successfully rendered n by the Helena Enco...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 15 January 1887

AN OLD MAN'S STORY, ,Written for the Tribune by Y. H. TIMS. He wasn't such a very a old man after :all, though almost universally he was call ed Old Mian Love. He looked to be 70, but was only a little over 50. His hair and beard were a griz zled gray. His forehead high, not bald. His nose prominent and red. His eyes .small, but with a merry twinkle in them that indicated a humorous soul. His shoulders were stooped, though strong looking. His figure short and stout, though by no means dumpy. In fact he was one of those big little men, The smoke from his meerschaum curl ,ed upward lazily as he sat upon the piazza of the A House in S- . Like most of the rest of us he was clad in sum mer habiliments, mosti noticable among which were a broad-brimmed straw hat and linen duster. It was one of those delicious summer nights which are the joy and boast of Cal ifornians, and one which everyone about the A- -- House seemed to be enjoying in a very quiet sort of a way, superinduc ed doubtless, ...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 15 January 1887

My Motto: "Never to be Undersold" THE ONE PRICE CLOTHIER Has Now on Hand a Large and Complete Stock of Winter Clothing, Purchased Before the Advance of Wool, Which We are Selling at Prices Which Defy Competition Call and Inspect Goods and Prices Before Purchasing Elsewhere. VhJeail and r . ese s Order T 1~7ill be ~iv-en rrorz.t .A.ttenrtion.. A. Nathan, "The Clothier," Next to "Tribune" Building, Great Falls. Goods as Represented or Money Refunded. GREAT FALLS TRIBUNE. MELANGE. Washington Letter; Mr. Toole is now endeavoring to secure the insertion of an amendment to one of the appropriation bills, by the senate committee on appro priations, of $25,000 for the survey of the N'orthern Pacific railroad lands in Mon tana. Gen. Sparks refuses to make these surveys on the ground that the govern ment may forfeit the lands in question. Whether the lands are forfeited or not it is important that they should be surveyed. If not forfeited they should be surveyed that the territory may tax the...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 15 January 1887

THROUGH THE ROCKIES. On the 23d of Jrn last some of us were 1 becalmed at the ,unmit of the Selkirk range. We were travelling in the con .truction car from Donald to Farwell (Revelstoke.) We were delayed, as the I road was not then travelled over, and some 1 little finishing touches were being execut- 1 ed in front. We were not sorry to spend I a couple of hours in such a scene. The great glacier was in front of us-a roaring t torrent behind, spanned by the beautiful trestle-work of a wonderful bridge. On t our right there rose up a snow-crowned s summit, and away down beneath us on the I left the brawling Beaver river, whilst the yellow light stole in among the huge pine I trees around us. There stretched along the line the construction town, one of the best specimens we saw-"Canvasville," we called it, There was one of these canvas tents worthy of note. It was two yards high, two yards broad, and two yards and a half long. A stove pipe protruded from it behind, suggesting that the...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 15 January 1887

GREAT FALLS, MONTANA. GREAT FALLS is located at the Falls of the Missouri which furnish the greatest available water power on the Continent. Is within seven miles of the most extensive COAL and IRON district in the West, immediately beyond which are rich GOLD, SILVER and COPPER districts. It lays tributary the best agricultural and grazing part of the Territory, and the pineries of the Upper Missouri and tributaries. It is especially adapted by its natural resources and geographical position to become the leading MANUFACTURING CITY between Minneapolis and the Pacific, and the principal RAILROAD CENTER of Montana. The trip to Great Falls will amply repay tourists.by the beauty of the scenery on the way, and they will find here the most magnificent series of waterfalls in the world, while the surrounding country is rich in picturesqe scenery. For further informatlon address H. O. CHOW EN, Agent. SPRAY OF THE FALLS. Ben Steell was down from gun River this week. Robert Vaughn was in tow...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 22 January 1887

GREAT F ALLS I RIBuNE, VOL. 2. GREAT FALLS, MONTANA TERRITORY, SATURDAY, JANUARY 22, 1887. NO 36 .. . ,. . How Sheep are Doing. The Calumet says no serious losses have been reported among sheepmen in that vicinity, which is the largest wool growing district in the territory. The same may be said of the flocks in this vi cinity. Benton's Fuel Famine. The fuel famine in Benton still con tinues with undiminished vigor. Sheriff Black informs us that fully one half the population of the town have not sufficient fuel to last them thirty days. The situa tion is becoming desperate. How it Happens. It happens thus sometimes: Jan. 1st, Swore off. " 2nd Swore of. "3rd Swore o. " 4th Swor, " 5th Swo. " 6th S. " 7th-Must see the doctor.--Pulse 99. -Respiration quick. Serious Accident. A wood-chopper employed by Hamilton & Eaten, on the island above town, had the misfortune to cut his leg and foot very severely last Monday. The axe struck the tibia bone, splitting it and entering the instep s...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 22 January 1887

My Motto: "Never to be Undersold" THE ONE PRICE CLOTHIER. Has Now on Hand a Large and Complete Stock of Winter Clothing, Purchased Before the Advance of Wool, Which We are Seiling at Prices Which Defy Competition Call and Inspect Goods and Prices Before Purchasing Elsewhere. Lail and 0Ex-press Orders X7ill be G-i-vren IPronpt ..ttenxýtion._ A. Nathan, "The Clothier," Next to "Tribune" Building, Great Falls. Goods as Represented or Money Refunded. -i iii w- GREAT FALLS TRIBUNE. CATCHING A SUCKER. The exhibition that I gave before a lot of congressmen in the billiard room of Willard's hotel lasted something like an hour, and I had just concluded my final shot, that of defying the laws of motion, or forcing the ball in three opposite direc tions, when the applause that followed brought in as it were, two new stars; or, in other words, at this moment two elegantly dressed gentlemen came into the room in a condition that bespoke a close commun ion with a couple quarts of Pon. Sec. They w...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 22 January 1887

THE PIONEER THEATRE. Why Bill Nye Adopted Literature In stead of the Drama. Those were troublesome times, indeed, when we were trying to settle up the new world and a few other matters at the same time. . Little do the soft eyed sons of prosperity understand today, as they walk the paved streets of the west under the cold glitter of the electric light, surrounded by all that can go to make life sweet and desirable, that not many years ago on that same ground their fathers fought the untutored savage by night and chased the bounding buffalo by day. All, all is changed. Time in his restless and resistless fight has filed away those ear ly years in the county clerk's office, and these times are not the old times. With the march of civilization I notice that it is safer for a man to attend a theatre than in the early days of the wild and wooly west. Time has made it easier for one to go to the opera and bring his daylights home with him than it used to be. It seems but a few short years...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 22 January 1887

GREAT FALLS TRIBUNE. WEEKLY TRIBUNE, T TIIBUiL PUBLIItINl COMPANY, [racozronm]u WILL IIAN iS, President. H. 0. CIHOWEX, Vice-Pres. C. Mf. WEBSTER, See. and Treas. LDVERTIBING RATES FURNISHED ON AP PLICATItON. SUBSCRIPTION RATES (seesy 1 year, (in advane) .............. $3.00 Oeleopy months,....................... 1.50 (Ao copy Y months..................... 1.00 1 Spe~kaa copis,............ ............ 10 uAlly in advance. lho .lrcnlaton of the TnBUsE in Northern M.alaa is gnaanteed to exsced that of any pa pea published in she territory. absorbers deeiring their address changed mms send their former address; this should be uemeiamered. Address, Taiuxa Pu~rIIS.sIN Co. SATURDAY, JAN. 22. 1887. THE Billings G:art-nr;1as changed hands, 1 E. B. Camp having purchased the outfit. 1 TTE Inter-State commerce bill passed the senate, and if Cleveland don't V-toe it, will become a law. GCN. W. B. HAZEN, chief signal officer t of the United States army died at Wash- f ington on the 16th inst. v...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 22 January 1887

Written for the Tribune by Y. H. TIMS. "Yes, sir; Mrs. Allen and her daughter cucre passengers," answered the stewardess with a strong emphasis on were and in re ply to my eager questioning look added. "The girl came safe, but the mother Jies in there." In a few words the explanation came. Chargres fever, that scourge of the Is thmus had stricken down Mrs. Allen, and only one day before the steamer's arrival she had died. I had expected in Nettie to find a child, and was considerably surprised when with trembling lip and tear swollen eyes she came into the saloon where I stood and without introduction or hesitation said in tremulous though trusting voice: "You are Mr. Love I believe." " Yes, Miss Allen, and fully at your ser vice in this sad hour of your bereavement," was my reply. "Mother said you would be sure to meet us here, and Mr. Love, I am wholly help less now, and shall trust everything to you." She was very girlish looking for sixteen, slender and pale. ier manner was a pe...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 22 January 1887

GREAT FALLS TRIBUNE. tl WEEKLY TRIBUNE, mMsm mo va . &raDAY By TE TIUBUE PUILIlHING COMPANY, WILL I4ANKS, President. P H. O. CHOWEN, Vick-Pres. c: U. iM. WEBSTER, Sec. and Treas. tl IADV)RTIEIsIN RATES FURNISHED ON AP- h PLICATION. k SUBSCRIPTION RATES- I sOeeepy 1 year, (in advance) ...........$..00 n (Oceop, I montas,...... ........... 1.50 Ome copy a months.................... 1.00 8pcata **copies ......................... 10 t G 5io5lp a advance. he aecalafton of the TanBUNain Northern Motema is gaesanteed to exeed that of any pa- U pee pablished in the territory. f abserlbers desiring their address changed mwt seld their former address; this should be amembexed. Addrsess, Ta.BUNN Puueai'ao Co. THE LOST NUGGEf. a There were a few lines of telegraph matter in the daily press a few days ago ij to the effect that a party had left Colorado Springs to hunt for the "Lost Nugget." Among the romances of the gold coast there are two which will live beyond all s others. The one is toe...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 22 January 1887

A TALK ABOUT INDIANS. Major Baldwin, of the Blackfeet Tells .How They are Getting Along Toward Civilization. .A fleshy, ruddy and very active man about the lobby of the Grand C enral yes terdav says the L1 vociftd, was Major RBaldwin, agent of the Bl=:cfeet, Indian in northern Montana. IIHe r-me down from his post of duty expecting to proceed to Washington, but now hopes that he has -made such arrangements by telegraph as will preclude the necessity for the eastern trip. As his family is sick at the agency he is very anxious to return to them. Major Baldwin says his Indians-the Blackfeet, Piegans and Bloods, who are practically one tribe--are in good condi tion and have made a fair start toward civilization. They rocognize that their old life of living by hunting. fishing and horse stealing is past, and that they must conform to the ordinary conditions of life. They have already made some start in the way of farming and during the past season raised quite a nice crop. Major Baldwin ...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
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