ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 1,232 items from Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
1,232 results
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 4 January 1893

7 1 THE! ADVOCATE. 11 Y vie; 'Call Out the Militia." The commanding general of the United tates army in hia last annual report commended that congress increase the propriation for the militia from $30,- to $1,000,000. What hostile power Ptantana fha no firm onil iiicfifina fViia mmendation? rjUjenerai m command or an army west & Mississippi re3ently said in a pub c'oijpeech: "It is the present policy to m bdraw regiments from points on the Jtier and station them near great I Jb like Chicago." What foe is this, on own threshold, to be kept in subjec- practically exterminated the red our fathers robbed? For what jrgehcy was the medieval fortress, the It regiment armory, erected in this Major Logan, of the Second Illi- infantry, has recently, to quote the papers, "made a good move." He ad placed in his headquarters a map of the city and county, show- all the city transportation lines and l location of every extensive factory. Is the major: n officer's duties are not only the ling o...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 4 January 1893

12 THE ADVOCATE. i V ness. But this is not where our troul, ends. Our shortages are running frc ten to twenty bushels on a car, and v can't get any recourse on them, as th claim the seal is all right. Now, what t want is to compel the railroad Compaq to put in trade scales at each station t ? have their agent to weigh each car ! certify to the weights, and then when shortages occur we can trace it op. ( VV. W. Smi-A Hollyrood, Kaa, December 20. -e Eastern Reformers Subside, i.i -. liiDiTOR advocate: it seems p well settled that Mr. Cleveland wil call an extra session of congress. gives some two years life to the pre lann laws, ana enuts out .all chancel i any change in the silver law. nr re? tion of those infamous dieoriminafi acraicst the nnor man which word powerfully portrayed by eastern cratic orators throughout the Ui, States during the lata canvass. In t so earnest were thev to stop the j robbery of the people by the tariff bi of the east and the silver kings o west, that they...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 4 January 1893

THE ADVOCATE. 13 IT 00MPULS0EY ABBITRATION. The Elements that Pavor and Those That Eeject it. Dr. Lyman Abbott has just come out with an article upon "Compulsory Arbi tration." The strong personality of the writer, and his catching, sympathetic vein for the sufferings of mankind, im part to his views no slight fascination. Yet must not these qualities blind our vision. There are three classes of people who 1 advocate compulsory arbitration in this country. They are of very different make-up. The first class consists of what may be termed the intellectual descendeata of Hamilton. To theca, compulsory arbi- t-oUon is only part of a general scheme. ) jy have no faith in the people. Their jdlib is to os tfipiiBO a raonarcpv, sjj t an oligarchy. They would intro e property qualifications for office j other civic as well as political f unc ;s, and run up these qualifications l enough to exclude the bulk of the pie. By this scheme, a few would and enjoy life, the masses would be jl in vass...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 4 January 1893

14 THE ADVOCATE. Very Significant. So thd M business interests" have had a banquet in New York. And that, too, in less than a week after the election At this mutual admiration social we find representatives of the generalship of both old parties. We are curious to know who are the accepted guests, and in looking over the list the first name we see is Grover Cleveland, president-elect of the United States. In hundreds of communities the common people are on the point of civil warfare in their bitter ness toward one another over the results of the election, while sitting opposite to Mr. Cleveland we notice Chauncey M. Depew, the man most cordially hated by organized labor all over the country and by democrats in general. He is the manager of a great corporation which knows no la not enacted at " the meet ing of the beard," - - As we continue down the list of " busi ness men" we find Charles Foster, secre tary of the treasury of the United States right now, and opposite this important ...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 4 January 1893

THE ADVOCATE, 15 How to be Healthy and nappy. Don't work 365 days in the year. Get out into the sunshine. Take a yaoation osoe in a while. If too busy o " lay off " last summer, buy an excursion tieket at once, tia Santa Fe route, to Las Vegas Hjt Springs, New Mex ioo, and stop a week or more at Montezuma hotel. Hot baths, burro riding, sunshiny days, and hunting in the mountains. Sep tember olimate lasts all winter. For copy of illustrated pamphlet, address O. T. Nicholson, G. P. & T. A., A., T. 4 S. F. B. B., Topeka, Kaa. "Among the Ozark." " The Land of Big Bed Apples" is the title of an attractive and highly interesting book recently issued. It is handsomely illustrated with views of south Missouri scenery, ino uding the famous Olden fruit farm of 3,000 acres in Howell oounty. It pertains entirely to fruit-raising in that great fruit belt of America, the southern slope of the Ozarks, and will prove of great value, not only to fruit-growers, but to every farmer and home-seeke...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 4 January 1893

Ca V-v " Ja,A ". 16 THE ADVOCATE. A I f TALBOT COEIHSW GO.. I C. BLOOM. A. M. WE8T. E. E. TALBOT, LIVE STOCK COMMISSION MERCHANTS, Booms 336-337 Stock Exchange KANSAS CITY STOCK YARDS. Correipondence solicited. Advances mad on consignments and to feeders. CHAS. TRAPPER & CO., WHOLESALE FEED AND HAY DEALERS. Corn In car lots for feeders a specialty. Con slgnments solicited. Good aalei. Prompt re turns, liefer to Missouri National Rank. 18th A Hickory Hta., Kaniat City, Mo. J. E. JOHNSON, Manager. moos conmssion go., 413 Exchange Balldlar, KANSAS CITY, MO, Only authorized Grain Agents of Kansas Alli ance Association. Liberal advancements made on all consignments. Market reports furnished on application, Free. HENRY W. IIOBY, M. D., Consulting and Operating SURGEON" Office, lis W. Sixth Ave., Topeka, Kas. TJ. B. McCURDY, VETERINARY SURGEON Graduate of Ontario Veterinary College, To ronto, (janaaa. surgery a specialty, xreau dis eases of domestic animals, Charges reasonable, Pronrle...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 11 January 1893

D TOPEKA TRIBUNE. Sm atuiLI TOPEKA, KANSAS, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11, 1893. mruarSmo Iahsu. i A DOUBLE-HEADER. Two Sets of Officers Trying to Run the Lower House in Kansas. WORKING UNDER DIFFICULTIES Mcst Complicated Situation Ever Jjiown in Kansas Politics The Senate Organized, bnt Doing No Business. Now exists the most peculiar condi tion ever known in a Kansas legislative body. Two houses of representatives are holding forth in representative hall waiting to be recognized by the senate and the governor. At this time, Thurs day morning, all the members, contest ants and both sets of officers are in their seats waiting to hear the result of a con ference between the party chairmen, Breidenthal, Jones and Simpson, with little hope of a settlement of the diffi culty. ( the nousE. At noon on Tuesday the interior of representative hall presented the appear ance ,of a well-regulated church confer ence with no politics attached. The galleries were filled with well behaved spectators, and th...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 11 January 1893

2 THE ADVOCATE. United States Itasnrj Ms ipi IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES. April 28, 1880. Ordered to be printed. December 17, 1880. Ordered to be reprinted. INo. io. Continued from last week.) The committee present the following comparative statement of interest on the public debt from 18G0 to 1870: , NO. 5 C. Prepared by the senate committee on treasury accounts. Comparative statement of interest on the public debt from J uly l, i860, to J uly l, 1S70. Year, 1SGO.. 1801.. 1862.. 1863.. 1864.. 1&5.. I860.. 1867.. 1808.. 1869.. 1870.. $ 3,443,687.29 6,092,630.4:5 22,048,809.69 41,854,148.01 78,853,487.24 137,742,617.43 146.068,196.29 138,892,451.39 128.459.598.14 125,523,998.34 118.784.960.34 $946,764,284.49 : 2 ft 'hi ; 1ft) : r I . o. $ 2,145.702.40 2.445,055.03 4,198,013. 96 11,970.152.62 27,172,650.36 82,444,077.52 104.257,907.08 159 614.758.49 110,851,959.41 181,506,9:13.64 167,001,472.78 $853,608,774.25 3b sgl gg 8 ao, : sd : fts7a : Si? So" : : SraHS : 3Sg? -yg? : y...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 11 January 1893

THE ADVOCATE. 3 expressed in 1871 in the following more energetic language of an English econo mist (London Statistical Society, volume 34, page 352): England is the peculiar seat of mone tary crises, just as Egypt is of the plague and India of the cholera. The monetary plagues are the bane and opprobrium of our country. In addition to the irregularities of its production, gold lacks sufficiency of mass to give it steadiness. It is neces sarily so subject to "jerks and changes," that to use it as an exclusive standard must reduce all business to gambling, No merchant can buy goods with gold to be sold for gold a year afterward, or even a few months afterward, without being subjected to a heavy risk. If he covers the risk by extra profits in the nature of insurance, he must impose a heavy tax upon those who deal with him. Whoever enters into a contract to pay gold in one, two or three years can not, by any possibility, foresee what its value may be when the contract matures. Gold, wh...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 11 January 1893

4 THE .AXrVOOA-TEJ. ptamdw yy I w mi i yMy AND TOPEKA TRIBUNE. N. P. A. PUBLISHXD SVEHI WEDNESDAY BY THE ADVOCATE PUBLISHING COMPANY, Booms 43 and 45 Knox Building, TOPEKA, - . - KANSAS. $1.00 PER YEAR. ADVERTISING RATES. For single Insertion : Display matter, 20 cents per line, 14 lines to the Inch. Reading notices, 40 cents per line. Discount for long -time contracts. Entered at the postolllce at Topeka, Kansas, as second class matter. WEDNESDAY, JANUARY "11, 1833. EEVOLUTIONAKY METHODS. There has been much talk recently through a certain portion of the republican press about revolutionary methods. It is a notoricus fact that every revolutionary movement thus far has teen by the republican paity. The movement began by counting Mr. Kotenthal out of a seat which everybody con ceded belonged' to him. When amended returns were received by the canvassing board before its ad journment establishing beyond a doubt the fact of his election, the board persisted in its determination to issue...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 11 January 1893

THE ADVOCATE. 5 THE SCHOOL BOOK QUESTION. In another place will be found a communication upon this subject from Jim M. Kane, of Oaawatomie, which contains some doctrine that is a little surprising to us, coming from the source it does. He says he is " not quite ready to be taxed to furnish books gratis ' for children that can lose and destroy three books per day." Neither is any other man ready to be taxed for any such purpose as that, and in trying to make a case friend Kane has indulged in a little extrava gance of expression which is without justification even to his own mind. There is no reason for the assump tion that any child would destroy or lose more books if they are furnished free than if purchased by the parents. In fact all the testimony of teachers who have had experience under the free text-books system is in the oppo site direction. It is said that the teachers themselves look after the books more carefully and that the average life of a book is longer than under our...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 11 January 1893

0 THE ADVOCATE. THE STATE HISTOEIOAL SOCIETY. In another place will be found a notice of the eighth biennial report of the State Historical Society in which some facta are stated relative to its accumulations and its present and future needs. This is one of the institutions of the state the value of which is not fully appreciated. It furnishes a storehouse of information the importance of which cannot be overestimated. No one can fully ap preciate it who is not so situated as to be able to avail himself of its benefits. The Advocate has found it of incalculable benefit in the polit ical campaigns through which the People's party has passed. -Mr-Adams and his associates have at all times extended to us every possible courtesy and assistance in the search for such data as we have needed, and they are ever ready to render like service to any person who is seeking any information whatever. It may be said that the chief bene fit of this institution is enjoyed by residents of Topeka and t...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 11 January 1893

THE ADVOCATE. 1 ADVOCATE EIGHT PEIHOIPLE. Editor Advocate: The Lyon county convention last August passed the fol lowing resolution against some very strong opposition: First The land, including all the natural sources of wealth, is the heritage of the people, and should not be subject to speculative tramo. Occupancy and use should be the only title to the pos session of land. The taxes upon land should be levied upon its full value for use, exolusive of 'improvements, and should be sumcient to take for the com munity all unearned increment. Taking the weight of taxation off of the agricultural districts where land has little value, and placing it on coal, mineral and city lands, where bare land, regardless of improvements, rises in value from thousands to millions of dol lars per acre. Second Give us with all the world as perfect freedom of trade ad now exists be tween the states of our union, thus en abling our people to share, through free exchanges, in all the advantages which na...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 11 January 1893

0 THE ADVOCATE. UALX0I0U3 MKBEPRESEmTIOIt. Tho Ajmkjate, of Topeka, the organ of the Populists in Kansas, haa been occupy ing much space in its columns in denuncia tions of the Journal, and has been saying many things against this paper, regardless of the truth. It has at (last come to direct and willful misrepresentation of facts, as - the following will Bhow: The Topoka correspondent of the Kansas City Journal has an interview with Senator Peffer in the issue of Deoember 27, in which tha senator's views of the senatorial contest in Kansas are fully set forth. Inasmuch as Senator Peffer is in Washington, and has not been in Topeka since some time before congress convened, the Journal sustains its well earned reputation for reliability in this interview. If the people desire to know what has not happened, let them read what the Journal says has happened. . There was no special from Topeka con taining an interview with Senator Peffer on that date, but there was one from Washing 'ton ...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 11 January 1893

THE ADVOCATE. 0 THE DfAUGUEATION. The People's State Officers Installed Be fore a State Audience. For the first time in the history of Kansas, every part of the state was fairly represented at the inauguration of a governor, on January 9, 1S93. It was a gala day not only for the Populists, but for Topekans of all parties, because all parties had a hand in making arrange ments for the reception to the new state officers. As was previously published, the com mittee had opposed all attempts to make it a display of splendor or gaudiness. In fact there was not much of an attempt in that direction anyway. It was to be an outpouring of the people to witness the consummation of a new departure in the politics of Kansas, this greatest and most progressive state of all. Thedeuuratiou committee, which was composed largely of ladies, had been very successful in their efforts to make repre sentative hall look prettier than it had ever been before. Evergreens, flowers and flags, many -colored rib...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 11 January 1893

ADVOCATE EIGHT PEINOIFLE. (Continued from page 7.) ficecflove ia the home, bo will he tend to increase the land value of the next quarter section, though the owner be a thousand miles away. And who gets this value? The farmer who is the cause? No! oh, no. It goes to the idler, the dog in the manger, the speculator, the landlord. For when a farmer comes along and wants to use this adjoining quarter, he must pay $3, $10, or maybe $20 per acre more than the first farmer had to pay. "Don't you see," says the speculator, "what that man has done over there? Land rich, he has made a good (?) living and put on all those im provements; so you can make a living and still pay more for the land than he did." And competition forces him to pay the additional value produced by tha former to the landlord, or go farther and fare worse. Further, in Kansas there, are recorded $175,000,000 of mortgages for land values, purthase money, rent the same as the Irish- tenant p the English landlord, though in...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 11 January 1893

THE ADVOCATE. 11 . rison against the rich, who stood by Van Buren. The question of slavery tempo rarily drove the question of poverty to the background, but just as soon as the union armies were disbanded, it jumped into prominence again. The cry went up on all sides, " We want to work, but we can find no employment." From that day to this, the want and the misery of the people have increased beyond endur ance; and we have it upon the authority of one whom the Gazette will surely not question, ex-United States Senator John J. Ingalls, that this country, which used to be called the land of the free and home of the brave, is fast becoming the land of the rich and the home of the slave. We have seen from the account above given why the mechanic lost his independ ence and became a wage slave: concen tration of capital, the mammoth machine rendered his email tools ueelesa to him. Similarly was the case with the farmer steam, railroads, and bonanza farms ren dered his produce unsalable at...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 11 January 1893

12 THB ADVOCATE. AHEBIOAN TEDEBATIOtf. The Last Annual Meeting a Very Inter esting One. The annual convention of the State Federation of Labor washeld in Kansas City, Kansas, January 2 and 3. A num ber of important subjects were discussed among which was the school book ques tion. A resolution favoring free and uniform text-books for common schools was passed. The following were elected officers for the year 1893: II. M. Ives, Topeka, pres ident W. A. Doidge, Leavenworth, first vice president; C. C. Bishop, Kansas City, second vice president; Lae Johnson, Topeka, secretary; C. C. Bowes, Topeka, treasurer. Council: J. F. Kirkprtrick, Topeka; Joseph Henkel, Wichita; J. H. liobinsou, Topeka; A. II. Jaeger, Leavea-. worth; H. Winch, Atchison. Legislative committee: J. O. Samuelson, Topeka; II. Shouse, Leavenworth; II. Winch, Atchison; Lee Johnson, Topeka; Joseph Henkel, Wichita; C. C. Bishop, Kansas City. President Ives delivered his annual address, from which the following ex tracts ar...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 11 January 1893

THE ADVOCATE. 13 Legislative Notes. Senator Price, of Atchison, was abeent at the organization of the senate. He was on the sick list. The opening of this session was the "biggest political event that has occurred in Kansas since the election. For once a Kansas legislative body was organized without the usual pre liminary prayers. Perhaps a little pray ing would have materially changed imngs. The supreme court was, as usual, anx ious to help the insurrectionists. Judg Strang was at the speaker's desk swear ing in republican officers before they were qualified to take any office. Harris and Crouch, the self-conceited pair of wind-bags who have been trying for the last six months to represent some party or faction, have made another fail ure. The democrats won't listea to them. Andrew Jackson Streeter, in 1888 Union Labor candidate for president, was here to attend the inauguration and the opening of the legislature. He may even stay till the senatorial election, for it is said he car...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 11 January 1893

THE ADVOCATE. "T3 IT3 Fr 8mi CEilTH NORMAL COLLEGE AND BUSINESS INSTITUTE. 129 pays for board, furnished room and tuition for ten weeks. Good accommodations and the best of Instruction given. Students of any grade can enter at any time and be sure to find class to suit them. Actual business In Business Depart ment. Catalogue and samples of penmanship tree. Address WM. STRYKER, Pres., Great Bend, Kas. CITY WATEEWOBKS v 13 FOE COUNTRY HOMES. La lias WE MAKE A SPECIAITY OP CLOVERS, TIMOTHY, GRASS SEED AND GARDEN SEED. 1423-1428 St. Louis Ave., KANSAS CITY, BIO. TROQBUU,' STREAM & ALLEN SEED CO. 14 P A Ufa 3 j h ff':"1 j; : H r 'k Li- The New Name, Editor Advocite:' Knights of La bor, Union Labor,. Famrera' Alli ance, Farmers' Mutual Benefit Asso ciation, Populists, or People' party, equal suffragists, prohibitionists, etc are names designating the fragments into which the great mass of the people of the United States are, as long as they no ram niu. honeleaslv divided. The fore- go...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
x
Loading...
x
x