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Elephind.com contains 5,782 items from Staunton Spectator, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 11 February 1862

___ STAUNTON .V A. [ TUESDAY, FEB. 11, 1862. ] — ■ ( Wood. Those who desire to pay their subscription in wood can do co by hanling ns good loads and good wood. Fight at Roanoke Island. A portion, at least, of the famous Burnside Fleet has at last "turned up" at Eoanoke Island, situated on the coast of North Carolina between the sounds of Albemarle and Pamlico. On Friday last, about fifty vessels or more made their appearance at that place and commenced an attack upon our batteries. The engagement was commenced in the morning and continued till 2 o'clock iv the evening. No damage in this first attack of any consequence was done to our batteries, lt is reported that we crippled two of their steamers. The enemy failed to ellect a landing, though several energetic attempts were made to do so. Some private residences on the Island were injured by the enemy's fire. P. S.—Later akd Saddee News.—lt becomes our painful duty to record in this postscript the greatest calamity which has befalle...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 11 February 1862

For the Spectator. Manassas! Light slept tbe soldiers oa the Sabbath eve/ Tbat Sabbath morn must light them to the fray, For on the distant hill-tops they perceive The foeman's vast and glittering array; A wide-extending hosjt o'er hill and dale Pollute with murd'rous tread Virginia's soil! Their discord rude defiles each placid vale, They seek with wicked speed our homes to spoil! Bright rose the sun on that eventful morn, lt Tke Sun of Austerlitz /" the Southrons said, And forth they marched by light of early dawn To sleep, perchance, at night on gory bed! Undaunted they by any numbers there, No craven fear possessed one manly heart, But each resolved to boldly do and dare, To meet the foe, and bravely act his part I Loud, loud the carnons roared in distant peals, Waking the ecnoes with thunder fierce and wild; The uncertain future now each soldier feels Is near—it wakes emotions strange and wild 1 Now loved ones far away appear to view, As backward o'er the past swift memory flie...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 18 February 1862

I STAUN ION.VA. TGESDAI, FEB. 18, 1862. ] ' F Wood. j Tbo3e w"io desire to pay their subscription in _ wood can do co by hauling ns good loads and v good wood. I Oar Recent Reverses. We are not disposed to take a gloomy view of the seemingly sad reverses with which onr arms have recently met. We do not feel discouraged j by them; on the contrary, we believe that they will eventually result in good to tie cause of the t South. l "The bud may have a bitter taste, Bat sweet will be the flower." These reverses are but the thunder-claps which were necessary to arouse the giant of Southern energy from its false re; use. We had indulged too long a fancied security, and it was neceasafor onr good that we should be aroused to a proper secse of our duty under the trying circumstances by which we are surrounded. We were enjoying our otium cum dignitate, and acting as though thera was no one to molest or make ns afraid, whilst a powetfnl and ruthless enemy was exerting all of his energies, with...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 18 February 1862

Military Bill a« Passed tf the Legislature. Whereas, the President of the Confederate State* ascertained the military quota of Virgin* for tbe existing war to be sixty five thousand eight hundred a_d forty-two men, aDd has made a requisition upon the Governor fcr a portion thereoi ; and it ia the pur ose of this act to apportion the said requisition ratably among the several counties, cities and towns of the Uoinuimweaith, according to the white population thereof, and . romptiy to raise tne same: 1. Be it therefore enacted oy the General Assembly, Tbat as soon aa may be af;er the passage ot this at, rhe Govern* r shall ascertain what cumber of men will be sufficient to raise the uuinbe. of each volunteer company vow in the Confederate service from this State, to the number ef 100 men, rank aDd file. He shall tbereupou a. p n tion the saint among the several counties cities and towns of the Commo_wealth, ascertain the number to be turuished by each, upoD the b«sis of ha white popula...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 25 February 1862

Stolw Sjttiator* STAUN ION,VA. TUESDAY, FEB. 25, 1862. Wtt-d. Those who iltairt to pay their subscription in wood oan do 9 5 by hauling us good loads and good wood. Fort DcueHon Captured by the Enemy. When the paper of last week was iesued we had received the news of the territi. fight at Fort Donelson up to Saturday night, to which time we had succeeded in repulsing the enemy with heavy loss. We had also received intelligence of the fact that the enemy had been so strongly reintoroed as to make the chances ol success preponderate in their favor in the eveut ot a renewal of the contest. When the force ol the enemy was 50,000 aud ours 15,000, we repulsed them, and covered the ground thick with their killed and wounded. But when they were reinforced till they numbered 70,000 and succeeded in surrounding the Fort, our Generals seeing that farther resistance would be fatile,and would eventuate in a useless sacrifice of maty hundreds of valuable lives, reluctantly came to the conclusion ...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 25 February 1862

Foreign Interposition. A writer io the Richmond Whig assigns tbe following rta3on3 for tbe belief tbat co a_siatai.ee by Foreign Powers will Le given to the Southern Confederacy ie its struggle for National ladeptn dence: Ist. The European Governments, (particularly Fraoce and Great Britain,) doubtless, tuJy believing ia the ability of the Confederate people to inni :taio their independence, are fort.eeiog the tULure consequences iv a c uiiuercial point ol view. They know that the deeper the North raus ia debt, the heavier, then, direct taxation among the people tor the next gecerauon. The H irthern people, having loaned the Federal Government the money to carry on tLe war cancut repudiate the public debt without ruining themselves, and haviug noexports beyond $100,---00?,000 annually, cannot raise oue-aixth of the aunual amount needed, without resorting to direct taxation. This ht.-tiine ! urdeu necessarily places them in a condiUou similar to European Governments, and thus euables...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 4 March 1862

TUESDAY, MARCH 4, 1862. Wood. Those wio desire to pay their subscription in wood, oao do so by hauling us good loads and good wood. Not is the Time lo Volunteer. The State of Virginia in this, the hour of her need, calls upon her sons to rally as volunteers to the standard of her defence. Shall she call in vain ? We hope not. There are a thousand reasons now why we shonld resist even to the deatb, where there was one at the beginning of tbe war when our volunteers rushed with such alacrity and enthusiasm to the standard of onr defence.— Has cur determination to resist diminished whilst the necessity of so doing bas increased a thousand fold ? No! This would argae that we were cravrn cowards, instead of men of true oourage and determined bravery. Bnt a short time is given wherein to determine whether the sons of Virginia will rally to her defence as volunteers or wait to be drafted. Those who will not volunteer by Monday next, the 10th day ol March, will ba liable to be drafted. Thos...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 4 March 1862

Battle-Sang of the Invade 1. The foe, the foe 1 they come, th-y come 1 Light up the beacon pyre, Let every hill and mountain home Give back the signal fire; And wave the red-cross on the nia.ht, The blood-red cross of war— What though we perish in the light, Our fathers died before! Up, meet the io.—ou to the strife! Fui freemens" b!a_es we hoM, And hand* ihat fight tor !a_d ai.d nfe Fight ooi like .hose for gi-id ! Give shoui ana banners to tne gale, The trump.t—peal it forth. Till our son. pour down from even vale Like snow flakes from tbe North. Ha. k.! lo then shouts _po_ tiie breeze, Tu-n bo-oar, in tne suu. And like the munaer of tne .ens Their deep tread thunders on! We'll meet them here ou eacn bold height, In every glen make head ; God give the battle to the right! We will be free or dead! We stand on sacred, holy ground, Where thousand memories meet. Our fathers' homes are all around, Their graves beneath our feet, Our roofs are smouldering far and wide That late smiled in...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 11 March 1862

_.iamttc« __»|tclattt. i 11, 1862. All the lElitia Called Outi The Governor . Proclamation of the 10th, (yesterday,) calling out all the militia was received too late for this issue. The forces from the counties of Morgan, Berkeley, Jefferson, • Frederick, Clarke, Hampshire, Warren, Shen- ' andoah, Hardy, Page, Pendleton, Highland, Rockingham, Augusta, Batb, Rockbridge, Alleghany, Botetourt and Craig, are ordered to report immediately to Gen. Thos. J. Jackson, at "Winchester. NAVAL VICTORY. The marine iron battirv "Virginia," formerly the "Mer-imac," left the Navy Yard at Norfolk at half past 11 o'clock on Saturday morning last, accompanied by three gunboats, and proceeded to Newport News. At a quarter of 2 o'clock the Federal frigates, supposed to be the Congress and the Cumberland, oommenced to fire upcn the Virginia. The latter, when at close opened her powerful rifled guns upon the frigate. At a quarter past 2 o'clock the battle raged with terrific violence, and at a quarter to ...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 11 March 1862

For the Spectator. An Appeal to Our Soldiers. 0 ! leave not the field e'er the victory's won, O ! leave not the ranks, now the contest's begun ; The contest for Freedom and honor and tight., It can only be won by your valor and might! Can you go to your homes and calmly sit down, And leave to your comrades the conqueror's crown ? Or perchance the proud foe, exulting, may come, And take fropi yoa "Freedom and honor and home." Will you pile up your coffers with silver and gold V What joy will it bring when you; Freedom is sold? When your wile, broken-hearted, will sleep ber last sleep, And your oi.ce happy children in bondage will weep ! Say, will you be freemen, or will you be slaves To th. iasesr of t\ rants—a nation of knaves? The choice is before you—to light or to fly— Choose now or choose MM —to conquer or die ! Ob, would i couid rouse every son of the South, To rush to the contlici for honor and truth ! To feel thai exck one must act nobly their pari, * With undying courage and...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 18 March 1862

STAUNTON .VA. TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1862. Returns of Election. The following is the vote of this conuty for and against the ratification of the amended constitution, so iar ap the returns have been received. The vote is very small, as was to I c expected under the circumstances of the times in which it was taken; _. > 2 s _T o _ 2 S _S I t > So °o 2? _ § o 2 _! O a Co_7t-bous-," 159 60-« 20 Union Hall, 50 10 65 4 Churchville, 22 8 dU Fisnerville, 16 6 21 1 Mt. Solon, » * H I Spring Hill, 20 13 f } Deerfield, 5 21 x ° ' Mt. Meridian, 13 — 13 — Newport, 28 3 26 5 Mt. Sidney, - 87 14 29 Midway, 14 — 14 — Parnassus, 18 3 20 1 Waynesboro', 48 9 • ■ New Hope, 17 10 29 1 Greenville, (not heard from.) Stuart's Draft, " Middlebrook, " Craigsville, «« Sherando, ■ Total, 428 174 519 80 Work lor All. The Eichmond Dispatch says that the whole nation should be divided into the army, and into those who feed and clothe the army, and furnish it with weapons and ammunition. In this...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 18 March 1862

Spwtator. US .HARD iIIAUZY, Edf.or& Proprietor. TERMS. tiF* Ike "SpECTAToa" is pablislud once a week, a Two Dollars and Fifty Cents a year, which may be dis charged by the payment of Two Dollars at any tim within the year. No subscription will be discontinued but al the option of th* Editor, until all arrearages are paid. AD VRHTfSEMENTS of ten lines [ar lees) inserted once for one dollar, and tioenty-jive cents for each subsequent continwince. larger lulcertisements inserted in the same proportion. A liberal discount made lo those w!io advertise by the year. m . . . "Jjf° Annual advertisers will he limited to their immtdiate t usineat, or the advertisements charged for at transient rates. Pbofbssional Cards, not exceeding seven lines, will be inserted one t/far for $7 Ou—6 months for t_ 00. Ox. Square, (lv lines) ..1 year $10 O'J " " ft months 6 00 3 " 400 'iVo Squares,.. .. lyear 1500 " •• fi months 10 00 " I '• 600 Thhee Squares, lyear 18 00 '« " & months ...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 25 March 1862

Stamtici. ST A fi N TON TUESDAY, MARCH 25, 1862. Thousands Disabled. In tbe performance cf our duties as a journal ist for a number ot years we have bad to record many disasters and unfortunate casualties, but though we have mentioned many that have been occasioned by cars running off tbe track, the explosion of powder magazines, tbe bursting of boilers en Steamboat and Railroad engines, the falling ft bouses, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and all the "moving accidents of flood and field," yet we bave never been called upon to record such a number of persons disabled by any or all of these agencies combined as bave been caused by an occurrence which recently happened in this State. Tbe 10th of March marks an epoch in the .liatory ot tbis State, for on tbat day a couDtleas host of disabled men were evoked from the bosom of this State, at.d it was made mani fest that our good old mother had a vast number of weak, enfeebled, diseased, crippled, deformed, and sickly children—many sha...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 25 March 1862

For the Special rr. Save this Valley I Soldiers! now with firmness rally, We be-eech you save this valley; This valley lost—then all is lost, This valley is Virginia's boast. Lincoln's vandal hosts assail us; They are drawing daily near us, Will you let them enter now, And before them tamely bow? Submission never— our rights maintain, We hear the soldiers all exclaim; Then from mountain, hill and valley, Soldiers, to the rescue, rally. These meuntains seem our safe stronghold, Between its hills our homes enfold; Virginia's "garden spot" is here; This valley, patriots hold most dear. Your homes are here—your all is here; Soldiers will not wish lor more To urge them to victory now I We know they'll ne'er submissive bow. Brave Jackson with his firm "stone Wall," Though it is moved, it did not fall; O I rally men and by his side, In victory may you safely ride. Repel the foe who dares to scale, T_e pillars of ti.at strong "Stone Wall;" Behind it we will feel secure, If God will aid you ...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 1 April 1862

.sbectator. STAUN JLON.VA. J\ TIJKSIiAI. APRIL 1, 1862. Battle Near Wiuchesier. For several days previously to going to pres.last week, and up to the time of the issue of the paper, it was currently reported and confidently believed here that the enemy, from some cans unknown, bad retracted precipitately beyot. Winchester, aud tht Col. Azov's cvalry ha. possession "1 that town. It was reported by va rio-j' person, who came up the Valley that C • A-fib,'. o_*s!-J bad IBW several ot the ei.et. iv the Main Street o! Winchester. Oo the _am day, however, th. t l.c psper was issued, we re ceived the un_X;>_ .led intelligence tbat a batil. h_d been fought on Sunday evening, the 28; dv) Marob. Ai first it was rept-r ed th.f Gen Jai_ son bad been deceived by a traitor who misrepresented the number and locality of the enemy, and that he was caught in an ambuscade am 1 repulsed with heavy lofs. Ie was _ot long hoy . ever, before liter and more reliable tafaiMat-M was obtained, which...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 1 April 1862

Good Officers Needed. What a soldier needn, is tc maintain his composure, to avoid panics, and to obey orders. To secure these, Confidence iv his i theirs is very necessary. An officer 5! ould fae! the full weight of his responsibility, aud in all respects mewi it. It is not often that an officer fails to be brave in banle. To skmk or to tremble in epaulettes is a disgrace, at thought of which eveuti.e timid shudder. But an officer should acquire the con fideuceof his men before the battle. It le secure this, it is very e-eldoui that ihey will desert him in the hour ot trial; tt.ey will t_»lhiw him anywhere. The importance of good officers is iudeed inC'icnlable; atd as ihe time is at hand when the com -fDi. 1 >*-ill elec their Captains nm] Lieutenants, ai.d t'i«se their reg-mental officer.*, tor th<War, we urge upon om solders the vital importance of miking judioiuu. . .lecti ns. The tear is txpr.ssed by in. _y that (he best . Ulcers .-.t present in the servic...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 8 April 1862

spectator. STAONiON.VA. , TI'KS ill. _Pf-IL 8, IRS.. \ . — ———^———————— .—_ i Our Enemies. ( The Confederate Sta'es have three distinct , classes of enemies, which the Memphis' Appeal ( forc'.bly describes as follows. We think onr home enemies are worse and mote detestable than the Yauk-es themselves :— 1. The Government and people of the United Sta'.es are onr enemies. But tuey are open enetnies. They meet tv upon the field with arms io th ir hands, and make war up' n as. They sbooi down oar soldiers, burn oar houses, dertrof our property, and eieal our negroes. "We kn )w where to find and how to deal with such an enemy. 3. rite second class of enemies are the croak ers -th* liiog faced men of faint heat ts aud weak nerves, who go up and down the country, seeking to impart iheir own iies(K»udency aud cowardic« to all Wit. wh>>m ihey c me in contact.— E-eryhiug §-*- wrovg, acmirding to these i'is mnl Jemmies. The gos-rnuient is weak and negbg-nt; our i.flicen. ...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 8 April 1862

•♦Call All I Call AH!" Whoop ! the Doodles have broken loose, Roaring round like the very deuce! Lice of Egypt, a hungry pack, After 'em, boys, and drive 'em back! Bull-dog, terrier, cur and fiee, Back lo the beggardly land of ice; Worry 'em, bite 'em, scratch and tear Es-erjbody and everywhere. Old Kentucky's caved from under, Term <see ts split asunder, Al.-_U_._ua a-aits attack. And tjeoigta bristles at her back. Old John Brown is dead aod gone! Still his spins, is marching on, Lantern-jawed, and legs, my boys, Loug as an Ape's fro a. lluuots ! Want a weapon ? (rather a brick ! Club or cudgel, or smne or stick, Auytbing wuh a blaie o? b tit, Anything that eau cleave or cut. Anything heavy, or hard or keen ! Any sort of slaying machine ! Anything with a wiliiug mind, And steady arm of a man behind. Wart a weapon ? Why capture one ! Every Doodle i_as got a gun. Belt, and bayonet, bright and new, Kill a Doodle, and capture two! Snoulder to shoulder, son and sire! All 1 ca...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 15 April 1862

%ttaio*e , STAUNTON .VA. ■ TUESUAY, APRIL 15. 1862. I - r The Patriotic Ladies of Augusta. The ladies of this good old county are not de generate daughters of the mothers of the revo- j 1-tion. They are ac lovely as they are beautiful, t and as patriotic as they are lovely. From the . beginning of the war, they have been doing all j tbat was within the sphere of tbeir powt r to do ( for the comfort and relief of onr soldiers, and for i the advancement of the cause of the South. — , They haver been assiduous in their labors, bave ] spared no pains, have made many sacrifices, and j are still willing to make many more for the sake 1 ot the oanse in which the South is engaged.— I When needed, they made with their own fair ( hands, though unused to toil, Caps, Jackets, ' Pants, Drawers, Shirts, Gloves and Socks for the ' soldiers. When sick, they ministered to their comfort and relief, by all tbe means whioh their sex knows so well bow to employ. Many a sick soldier, as be lay upon his c...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 15 April 1862

A Noble and Prophetic Ballad. The following stirring piece of poetry was written several years since, but poor Joe Brenan did not live to see his prophecy fulfilled. He died of the effects of yellow fever in New Orleans, where he was associate Editor of the Delta. He was an accomplished scholar, a fine poet, a clever prose writer, a kind and gonial friend, and a true patriot. In the following nervous effusion, we see the spirit of a brave man, appealing to his brethren of the South, by every consideration that can fire the patriotic heart, to struggle for "a triumph or a sh'oud." In these days when, in his own glowing language, "The hour has come for manly deeds, And not for puling words," the fiery invocation of poor Brenan will strike a sympathetic chord in the hearts of thousands, no longer insensible to the "omens in the sky." A BALLAD FOR THE YOUNG- SOUTH. BY JOSSPB BBBXAX. I. Men of the South! our foes are up In fierce and grim array; Tbeir sable banner laps the air— An insult...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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