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Elephind.com contains 8,145 items from Grenville Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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THE RESISTANCE BY AIR. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 20 March 1915

THE RESISTANCE BY AIR. The effects of air resistance are well shown in the twelve and a-half miles Simplon Tunnel, where an ex ceptionally high amount of energy is required for running the electric trams. The tunnel, which is fifteen feet wide and eighteen feet high, with a sectional area of two -hundred and fifty square feet, has a ventilating current of three thousand five hun dred and thirty feet cubic of air per second, maintained by two large j blast fans at the Brigue end and two exhaust fans at Iselle. Trains going with this current encounter less re sistance than in open air up to fifteen and a-half miles an hour, but at high er speeds or in the opposite direction the resistance is much greater than outside. Moving by gravity down the seven per one thousand maximum gradient, a train, even though going with the current, cannot exceed thirty-five miles an hour on account of the breaking by the air.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SUNSET AND DAWN CHAPTER XV. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 20 March 1915

By EFFIE ADELAIDE ROWLANDS. (Published by arrangement with Ward, Lock & Co. Ltd., Lon. & Melb.) All Rights Reserved. CHAPTER XV. • The day of Dolly Torrington's wed ding broke jn a glorious sunrise. The girl was up and watching for this sunrise. Dolly had never imagined that on her wedding day she would feel so un happy as she felt now; hut the truth was that she was fretting about her sister. No confidences were exchanged be tween Margaret and herself, and they spoke, when necessary, on trivial things. Once now and again it struck Dolly as being very strange that her sister had taken the presence of Ma demoiselle Slivinski so quietly, mak ing no comment, and not- speaking about the Russian girl except in the most casual way; but then every thing about Margaret was very' strange; she was. so changed. The onl: person to whom Dolly could con fide all that she felt on- this matter j was her lover, and Lord Bletchley and she talked all the time about Mar- } garet and a"b...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ELIJAH FOR RUSSIAN AIRMEN. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 20 March 1915

ELIJAH FOR RUSSIAN AIRMEN. The Russian aviators have just cnosen for their patron saint the pro phet Elijah, because he "-conquered the air" and went up to Heaven in a fiery chariot. iThis, together with the fact that skaters have designated St. Ludwina, who fell on the ice and sustained injuries which she bore with edifying patience, to fill the office of their patron, goes to prove that once again the old custom of re cognising saints is coming into fash ion. Four or five centuries ago every town or village, church or public building of any kind, was presided over by some hero, and even trades, societies and corporations had their special saints. For instance, St. Agatha was made the guardian angel of all who belong to the nursing profession, because of the martyrdom she suffered; whilst St. Gregory, who is recognised as the patron of all studious persons, was probably chosen on account of the fact that he spent his last years in a cave in "studious seclusion." Musicians must ackn...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THEY DROP THESE BOMBS. About the Queer Shells Airmen Use. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 20 March 1915

THEY DROP THESE BOMBS. About the Queer Shells Airmen Use. Since the value of aircraft in war fare has been recognised by the mili tary authorities, ordnance firms have devoted special attention to the man ufacturing of various bombs to be . used solely from aeroplanes, and . some ingenious inventions have re sulted, so that to-day there are a number of bombs in use that are in tended to do all sorts of work, as well as destroying and killing. A bomb that the Germans use large ly is a sort of "safety bomb." Charged with a large supply of T.N.T.—Trini trotulul—and carrying a quantity of steel balls, it does enormous damage whenever it explodes, but the "safe ty" part is the most ingenious ar rangement in connection with it. This safety-catch prevents the bomb from exploding until it is well away from the airship, and so does away w^ith the possibility of the avi ators being literally hoist with their own petard. A small vane or fan is connected ' with the catch itself, and this vane, ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XVI. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 20 March 1915

CHAPTER XVI. Marcus Vinsen said nothing to Ma dame Ducheron of the discovery he had made. He had conquered that first passionate rage and then had re solved to play his part quietly and with subtlety, for if Leah thought she was done with him she had made a very great mistake. Vinsen also owed Leah's mother a grudge; he felt that he had not been treated fair ly. He had shown Madame Ducheron that he was a man to be trusted. They were now partners in most of her big ■ schemes. The man honestly consid ered himself in every -way a good i match and a proper husband for J Leah Ducheron. Of course, he had gone to the truth of the matter. He had realised that it had been Leah herself, rather than her mother, who had brought about this wonderful ■ change in the girl's position; but he , blamed tne mother none the less, be cause, to his practical nature, he ! could see nothing advantageous to Leah in this launching of the girl in- ' to a section of society where she had no real place. ! It ha...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WAR AND RABBIT DESTRUCTION [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 20 March 1915

WAR AND RABBIT DESTRUCTION The Federal Government and the various State Governments of Austra lia are at their wits ends as to how to deal with the big army of unem ployed. Now, Sir, the rabbit is by far the greatest pest in-^Australia, and is rapidly increasing. The rabbit turn ed into food is a relish. How would the other nations appreciate it as a food? Why cannot a scheme be worked successfully to send the un employed into badly-infested districts to trap rabbits, and .have them for warded to the freezing works and ex ported? The rabbits could be paid for by the hundred, or by the thousand, or some other convenient way. What would be the result? 1. After several years millions 01 acres that are useless to the owner and useless to the State, would be converted into rich grazing and agri cultural land. The State would then ' carry millions more sheep, and there ; would be a large increase in the agri , cultural -area. [ 2. The landowner would be reliev ed of the great burden of ra...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE REVEILLE. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 20 March 1915

THE REVEILLE. By Bret Harte. Hark! I hear the tramp of thousands j And of armed men the hum; | Lo! a nation's hosts have gathered Round the quick alarming drum— j Saying, "Come, I Freemen, come! Ere your heritage be wasted," said the quick alarming drum. j "Let me of my heart take counsel: War is not of life the sum; Who shall stay and reap the harvest | When the autumn days shall come?" But the drum I Echoed, "Come! Death shall reap the braver harvest," | said the solemn-sounding drum. , "What if, 'mid the battle's thunder, i Whistling shot and bursting bomb, . When my brothers fall around me, Should my heart grow cold and , numb?" | But the drum Answered, "Come! Better there in death united than in , life a recreant—come!" Thus they answered—hoping, fearing, Some in faith, and doubting^ some, Till a trumpet-voice, proclaiming, Said, "My chosen people, come!" i Then the drum, Lo! was dumb, . For the great heart of the nation, j throbbing, answered, "Lord, we I come!"

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
KAISER BILL'S INCOME. How His Money is Invested. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 20 March 1915

KAISER BILL'S INCOME. How His Money is Invested. Thanks to the advice of financiers who, for obvious reasons, he admitted to his friendship, the Kaiser's private fortune has increased to such an ex tent of late years that it was estimat ed a short time ago fay the eminent German authority, Herr Rudolph Mar tin, that he is easily the richest man in Germany, having an annual income of one million sterling derived from possessions valued at approximately '£20,000,000. Apart from the Kaiser's fortune, his son, the Crown Prince, has a separate income of £50,000, drawn from pro perty valued at nearly £1,000,000, while the Kaiser's brother, Prince Henry, enjoys some £30,000 a year on account of an estate worth half a million; Altogether the principal mem bers of the Hohenzollern family own property valued at approximately £25,000,000. The Kaiser's fortune has been main ly built up by investments in many businesses. He has some very large holdings in the big German steamship lines, is exten...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
STRAW FOR HATS. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 20 March 1915

I j STRAW FOR HATS. I 'The greater part of the straw em ployed for making summer hats comes from Italy. To. obtain suitable straw for this purpose the wheat is sown as thickly as possible, in order that the growth of the plant may be impoverished, as well as to produce a thin stalk. The Italian wheat blooms at the beginning of June, and is pulled up by the roots, when the grain is half developed. Should it be allowed to remain in the ground a longer time, the straw would become too brittle for its purpose. Uprooted straws, to . the number of about five dozen, the size of the com pass of the two hands, are firmly tied together in little sheaves and stowed away in barns. After that the straw is again spread out to catch the heavy summer dews and to bleach in the sun. When the product has been sufficiently bleached, it is put into small bundles and classified. The last step is to cut it close above the first joint from the top, when it is again tied up in small 'bundles containing sixt...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 March 1915

CYCLE AND MOTOR CYCLE -REPAIRS It doesn't matter what's the matter with your machine—Cycle or Motor Cycle—send it to me. I'll guarantee to " fix it up." I don't employ " tinkers," but expert mechanics, whose sole aim is to turn out work that will give satisfaction. And that's what you WILL get if you let me do your work. Sole District Agent for England's premier Motor Cycle—the L.M.C. -J. A. HOLLAND," 107 STURT ST., : BALLARAT. PHOWS 4© ©. Tel. 410. EstAb. 1853 h. E. GUTTER, CARRIAGE Ss MOTOR BUILDER, ARMSTRONG STREET SOOTH BALLARAT, Headquarters for high-grade ve hicles, Motor Body experts, Wind Shields (fitted up with latest fixings), Hood Coverings of the latest designs. Cars painted and ornamented by latest scientific methods. Single and Double Abbott Buggies, Open Buggies, Double and Single Buggies suitable for country use, Gigs, Road Carts, Sulkies of all descriptions, Farmers' Spring Drays, Waggonettes of all descriptions, and Bush Fire Carts. Write to us for quotations for a...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Our Boys in Egypt. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 March 1915

a v m a ' LETTER FROM MR N. CARNEGIE. Mr Norman Carnegie, who is with the Aus tralian Imperial Force in Egypt, ha3 written to his friends at Scarsdale from Mena Camp. The following extracts have been handed to us for publication :— We had a good trip, bat nearly lost our boat the night the Ascanius ran into us ; but that only makes the voyage more memorable. Taking the trip altogether, it is a great eye opener to all of us lads. It is agreeing with me, as I am 13st now and feel Al. This is a changeable climate. The days are very hot, and the nights very cold. We have three blankets, a waterproof sheet and our greatcoats, so are comfortable enough. 1 am quite used to sleeping on the ground, and when " reveille " goes at 6.15 a.m. I often wish it was Sunday morning at home, so that I could have a sleep in. We have very nice tents, large square ones, which would hold BO or 40 men at a pinch, but have only 20, so there is plenty of room. They have a double roof and four doors, and are v...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 March 1915

Commonwealth JmL 3Banti orBustralta HEAD OFFICE <§fp||||p SYDNEY This Bank is open for all classes of GENERAL. BANKING BUSINESS a' POST OFFICE BUILDINGS, Sturt & Lydiard Sts., BALLARAT Also at Melbourne, Sydney, Newcastle, Broken Hill, Dubbo, Canberra, Ade laide, Perth, Hobart, Brisbane! Rockhampton, Townsville and London. Cable remittances made to, and drafts drawn on foreign places direct. Foreign bills negotiated and collected. Letters of credit issued to any pare of the world." Bills negotiated or forwarded for collection. Banking and Exchange Business of every description transacted within the Common wealth, United Kingdom and abroad. Current accounts opened. Interest paid on fixed deposits. Advances made against approved securities. SAVINGS BANK DEPARTMENT Branch Office: BALLARAT. Victorian Central Office; 317 COLLINS STREET, ''MELBOURNE. Branches in the above cities and 2,000 Agencies at Post Offices throughout the Commonwealth Deposits from 1/- to £300. In...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
How to Correct Faulty Digestion. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 March 1915

Bow (o Correct Fating Digestion. j Faulty digestion, flatulence, and in- I digestion—and, in fact, most forms of stomach trouble—are almost invariable die to acidity and food fermentation. Drugs and medicines are useless in these cases because they act onlyeon the s-omach and do not affect tne cause of the trouble—-the acidity and fermenting food. To instantly neutralise the acid and stop fermentation, physicians and specialists usually prescribe half a tea sqoonful of bisurated magnesia, obtain able of all chemists and dispensaries, in a little water immediately after'meals or >v hen ever pain is felt. Since the dis covery by an eminent specialist of this remarkable property of bisurated mag nesia, it has been generally adopted as the standard antacid and food corrective in many hospitals and by many of the most prominent medical men of the day. Dyspeptics should always keep bisurated magnesia handy as its use invariably in sures painless, normal digestion. '

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Cycling and Motor Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 March 1915

At the annual meeting of the Vic torian Good Roads Association held last week, two important matters to cyclists and motorists were discussed. The meeting was somewhat a critical one, among those who were present being the State Governor, members of Parliament, civil engineers, municipal councillors and managers of State Departments. It was urged that the Federal Govern ment should take over interstate con necting highways and those connecting forts, military, depots and naval strategic roads. Moreover it was shown that through the Customs the Commonwealth collects on motors and parts hundreds of thousands of pounds annually, and, therefore should contribute something to the upkeep of the roadways, because, too, it uses them largely all over Aus tralia as postal delivery routes. It was also proposed at the meeting that a general wheel tax should be imposed on the principle that all those who use the highways should pay for their construc tion and maintenance. The proposal was well r...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Happy Valley News. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 March 1915

Mr R. Dunstan, of Ballarat, con ducted the service on Sunday afternoon of the harvest festival at the Methodist Church. The church was nicely decor ated, and there was a fine collection of vegetables. On Monday night Mr J. M. Wise, superintendent of the Sunday school, sold the vegetables by auction. Cattle were again scarce at the Cor poration sale yards on Tuesday, and suitable trade beef sold at fully late highest value. Prime bullocks were taken at from £14 to £17, aud extra weights from £19 5s to £20, with prime cows to £11, and extra prime to £18. Two bullocks sold for Mr W. Archibald, of Macarthur, averaged £20. The best of the 130 calves penned brought £8 17s 6d. Prime sheep were in good de mand, and values generally were about equal to last week's rates. Prime cross bred wethers sold at from 23s to 24s, and extra quality to 259 lid ; prime crossbred ewes from 21s to 24s, extra quality 'to 26s to 28s 9d, and a few to 80s. Quality lambs were in good de mand, and made late rate...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Guard Our Soldiers. THE DANGERS FROM DISEASE. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 March 1915

^ — THE DANGERS FROM DISEASE. The Australasian White Cross League appeals for funds to enable booklets warning men against the dangers of sexual immorality to be distributed freely among our Australian soldiers. These booklets not only point out in the plain est terms the dire effects of venereal dis eases in wrecking the physical frame, and producing years or a life-time of misery and suffering, but make an appeal also to the noble and chivalrous instincts latent in nearly all young men, urging them to self-control for the sake of womanhood. It is believed that if one or more of these booklets can be placed in the hands of every soldier whether in camp in the various States, or on board ship, or in Egypt, incalcuable good will result. It is appalling to think that hundreds of these fine young men—the very flower of our race—may acquire some loathsome disease which will blast the future of their life, and it may be that of their chil dren, through the want of some plain words of ins...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 March 1915

WASTE PAPER FOR SALE; good clean lots, 12 lbs for 3d. Also cheap" WHITE PAPER, suitable for batchers' use. Standee! Office, Linton,

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TEN COMMANDMENTS FOR A YOUNG SOLDIER. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 March 1915

TEN COMMANDMENTS FOR A YOUNG SOLDIER. First, do as you're ordered; the fight ing-man's school Obedience commands as its primary rule. And, second, remember, in taking your place Good soldiers would rather meet death than disgrace. Third, keep up your pecker, whatever you do— The hopes of a nation are centred on you. Fourth, keep with the column—don't straggle behind, Or soon you will be "out of eight, out of mind." Of wastage your cartridge supply won't admit, So, fifthly, when aiming, endeavor to hit! Sixth, don't rush out carelessly—wait till you're led; To keep life and limb you must first keep your head. The seventh commandment at meal times obey— Don't growl at the food—you are "roughing" to-day! Eighth, mercy to wounded you al ways must show; Th§ whole world abhors a barbarian foe. Be clean in your habits, as far as you can— We wish you, in Berlin, to look spick and span. And, tenthly, when battle affords a respite, Give thought to your loved ones at home, lad, and—write! Moth...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DESERVED THE V.C. A ROMANCE OF THE BATTLE-FIELD. I [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 March 1915

DESERVED THE V.C. A ROMA'NCE OF THE BATTLE FIELD. I. His Majesty's prison of Belhampton reared its repulsive head in the midst . of the broad, smiling landscape on the far outskirts of the town. Its frowning towers and forest of smok ing chimneys looked woefully out of p?ace in that delightful spot, surround ed by gorgeous green fields and charm ing sylvan scenery. A lark was sing ing in the heavens, hovering over the prison as though rejoicing in its free dom in contrast to the poor prison ers interned in the grey, grim build ing beneath. It was early morning, and a group of warders, in their blue serge uni forms and peaked caps, stood chatting outside the spiked portals of the gloomy gaol, preparatory to commenc ing their drab and dreary duties. "How are you getting on with your little lot, Ben?" asked a warder of one of his companions. "Had another dust-up with B 39 on my landing yesterday," answered War der Ben Trammers. "More bread and water diet for the poor beggar. He fairly ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
VANISHED GERMAN BANDS. We hope they have bidden us a long, long farewell! [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 March 1915

VANISHED GERMAN BANDS. We hope they have bidden us a long, long farewell! Oil, let me mourn in solitude and tear my scanty locks; alone upon ill fate I'd brood, a wreck upon the rocks. A sable cloud obscures my skies and fills my soul with dread; from life, which once made glad my eyes, the harmony has fled! Gone from our bleak, uncultured land are Wilhelm, Hans, and Fritz; no longer come they cap in hand with wild and twisty bits. Vamoosed has blue-eyed Adalbert, who once was pleased to .blow, until one feared internal hurt, upon his piccolo. The gentle Max, without farewell, has packed his bag and flown, a wizard, he, who weaved a spell with battered saxophone; and Herman, chieftain of the crowd which brought bi-weekly bliss, has until Potsdam's order bowed and given me a miss. Oft in the morn and dewy eve they brought my being balm (a pair of ear wads, by your leave, protected me from harm); with zeal that ne'er a doubtful egg or cynic sneer could cool, they'd use persuasive airs...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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