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Title: Hawkesbury Advocate Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 3,586 items from Hawkesbury Advocate, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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A TELEGRAPH WIRE LAID BY A RAT. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 27 October 1899

A TELEGRAPH WIRE LAID BY A RAT. As most people know, remarks a writer in the " Cornhill," the main telegraph wires in London run through the subways in which the gaspipes and sewers are placed. The principal arteries are so large that it is easy enough for men to work in them,~But the pipes through which the side-wires branch off are mach smaller, and great care has to be taken to preserve the connection between the main and the lateral wires. Some years ago men were repairing one of these latter, and carelessly omitted to attach in to a leading line by which it could be drawn to its place when mended. The blunder seemed likely to have serious consequences, for it was thought that the whole of the lateral pipe would have to be dug up in order to get at the broken wire. But one of the men came to the rescue with a happy thought, suggesting that a rat shonld be procured, and.with a fine piece of wire at tached to it, Bent through the pipe. This was done; but, to the dismay of the work...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A DOLL RENAISSANCE. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 27 October 1899

A DOLL RENAISSANCE. It will hardly surprise anybody to learn that there are fashions in dolls. It may have given them a slight shock to learn that there is a Baby's Club in existence, but fashions in dolls-Well, the thing seems almost natural. A child, even the veriest infant, cannot, in reason, be expected to go on loving the same sort of contrivance month after month, especially as, according to a Regent-street authority, an English child " consumes " on an average six dolls per annum. The movement is chiefly distin guished by a return to wax dolls of English manufacture. " It ls a reaction in the nurseries," said one dealer. " For years French and German bisque has reigned, and year after year they have been getting cheaper, until now a doll which twenty years ago would have cost a guinea can be had, completely dressed, for a shilling. When you consider that about 4,000,000 dolls are Bold annually in the king dom you can see what this means to the doll importe» s, among whom the ...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MONEY IN CAT TAILS. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 27 October 1899

MOMEY IN CAT TAILS. 1 [ Very few people, probably, are aware that I the for, or vegetable down, of the cat-tail is a marketable article, superior to feathers or cotton for many purposes. It is not quite ! so valuable or useful as eiderdown, but it approaches it very closely and is cheaper than any of the three. As' a matter of fact, a great many people are to-day using articles covered with cat-tail products who have no idea «here the material comes from. It is a vast extent of coun try.comparat i vely speaking, from which the cat-tail is gathered. It comes from the swamps along the numer ous creeks that put in from Delaware Bay, from Morris river to Gape May. The average amount gathered in the season ÎB a ton's, day. The work of gathering and transporting it. and then weaving it into the many forms which it must take before becoming saleable, constitutes a considerable industry. One of the most elaborate uses to which this material is put is that of covering sofas. Very many of the...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
EXAMPLES OF DETECTIVE MAGIC. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 27 October 1899

[EXAMPLES OF OETECTIVE MAGIC I Magicians abound at the present day in ali the great centres of civilisation-Cheiro mancers, Spiritualists, S sers of the Cry stal, Mahatmas, Thought Readers, Astrolo gers, interpreters of the cards and the coffee grounds. Bat they give no assistance to the police. The di vine power which animates them refuses to do such mean service. It is a pity. They may scorn the profits which would flow in. But philanthropy ia their strong point in general, and they could con fer no benefit on à fellow creature more heartily appreciated that the restoration of his lost property. Moreover, they are all anxious to make proselytes7 and what means could be more effective ? Savants and personages whose conversion would be a triumph have proclaimed that they are ready to believe all that is asked of them if the adept will perform that miracle. But the spirits or something forbid, and it is no use to argue. Fortunately (says the " Even ing Standard, ") there are magician...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
COOING COUPLES. WHICH? [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 27 October 1899

[ COOING COUPLES. WHICH ? I sat in the cars, while jost behind Two ladies their nimble tongues combined In conversation, using phrases such As " I am so tired," and " Ever BO much," " How lovely! " I know," " He was so kind." " I felt so badly," " I've half a mind," " And did you see those beautiful things ? " *, How was it trimmed ? " " Such lovely string " " Do come and see me," " Oh, thank you, yes," " Isn't it awful ? " "Just see my dress," \ " Oh, dear me, do you think him nice T " j " My feet, I declare, are as cold as ice." I And they talked of beaux, and other vanities Of bracelets, rings, and such inanities. My ears could no longer stand the jar. So I changed my seat to the smoking car. A change, indeed! Two men were there And, truly, they were a precius pair! Their talk was vulgar; coarse, profane. They took the name of God in vain. And, getting weary of oath and curse, I went back to the girls, thinking; " Which is worse ? "

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
An Old "Bowler's Growl." [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 27 October 1899

A n Old ** Bowler*« Oro wi." "Will you allow rae to call the attention of all cricketers to the serious decadence that is taking place in our national game by the long scores whieb are now such a common occurrence all over the country ? We are naturally all proud of Mr. W. G. Grace and his wonderful aptitude for the game at an age when most people have retired upon any laurels they may have gained in this line ; but it does not follow that we have not had in times past just as great, if not greater, cricketers. Does anybody in his senses believe that If Mr. W. G. Grace or any of the multitude of ' century getters' had to run their own runs they would make anything like the big scores they do ? Of course not. In rold days, while they were running after a hit, the bowler was taking his breath, and they were losing it, and consequently he had a chance. Now the cricket-grounds are made so level and so carefully drained that any ball that i passes a field goes to the boundary. The fact i...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Comic Cuttings. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 27 October 1899

I Comic Cuttings- ¡ " Do you believe in first impressions ?" Â "To be sure I do. Tm a print-seller." fl The maufacture of alcohol In secret was ? made illegal many years ago, and it is M illicit still. fl The man who made an attempt to in- Vfl duce a dumb child to speak found that Sj it would not answer. HJ It is stated that there are a number Tj of female bootblacks in Paris. They \ ought to shine at the job. " Jmklets : " I want my wife to be a « woman who thinks before she speaks." w Plunkett : " Why don't you say you are a confirmed bachelor." " De man dat comes roun* makin' de mos' noise," said Uncle Eben, "doan* ginerally hab *nuf time lef ' foh ter make anyt'ink else." Father : " If you marry him you will have to live on w?nd." Daughter : "That's what I expect to do. Charlie ls a manufacturer nf inflated tires." She : " Do you believe In football for ladies ?" He: " Yes, indeed I do." She : " Then you're a new man, I sup pose ?" He : " No ; I'm a surgeon." ? Blobbs : " Do you...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Nine Tailors Make a Man. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 27 October 1899

Nine Tailors ¡flake a Ulan. .This expression brings us to the con sideration of the universal eustoni of the ringing of * church-bells-a practice regarded as almost sacred in most minds as being one of the ceremonies attached to the Christian faith. Its origin, how ever, is a very superstitious one, and the ringing of bells was formerly practised from a belief in ? their efficacy to . drive away evil spirits. The "tailors" in the above phrase is à corruption of ;tiie word "tel lers." or strokes tolled at the end of a knell: Immediately on the death of a person a "knell is tolled,/the idea having originally "been* as jgreVionsIy observed, to keep «ff hostile'fcplrits from the how departing one. In some places the de parture Of an adult" was announced by nine strokes in -succession '; ¡six were rung for a woman ; three for a child. Hence, it came to be said by those listen ing for the announcement. " Nine tellers make a man." As this custom became less general and the allusion less ge...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Deeming Murders in England. How They Were Discovered. A True Detective Story. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 27 October 1899

1ËV i Bfe /The Deeming Murders ¡n IE'"':--- England. , , pl? How TUey Were Discovered. B| JL Trae Detective Story. ¡¡¡§1?*" It was bitterly cold in the city on tho «h of March, 1892, and tiny stalactites of slowly-thawing iee hung from the B§p|La heavy moustache of a strongly-built man ||ip|~^ who had just come in from the street ¡¡IfeL outside, and was resting his elbows on gig* tjje mahogany writing-table of one of »P^j|' the largest dealers In dairy produce in glpS London. The dealer and his visitor ¡¡¡¡Lf^ talked In rapid confidential tones upon ¡¡¡gjL. business matters, upon the prices and qualities and grades of butter, npon the |% X.» state of the market, cargoes and methods of packing, the present glut and the lllir^ future prospects of Danish, Normandy, ¡fe&T and Australian sorts. % Cling-a-ling-a-ling went an electric-bell _j, across the passage, and in a moment or " two a well-drilled office-boy knocked at sT i the door, and, addressing the latest PigSñ- comer, sa...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Jonathan on the Bagpipe. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 27 October 1899

-- - s . . Jonathan on the Bagpipe. An. American paper tells its readers how the bagpipe is played. The strug gle between a musician and his bagpipe, says the writer, is to us a thrilling sight, j The Scot puts his left arm about the ?waist Of the instrument, endeavouring to catch an under ** holt." The fellow, when he is coupled to the machine, fair ly bristles with rubes, nozzles, and , pipes, which point out¿óver bis shoulders, j from under his arms, and from all avail able points. When everything is ready he looks up and seemsöethke a parting' glance at the sun, the Mfa ves, the birds, and the beautiful things of TSature. Then he shuts his eyes, and-the straggle be gins. He pumps with .his-arms, works his knees, and heaves'.his chest After he has been at^this a while a doleful sound begins td issue from one of the tubes. A pipe catches the disorder. Then a nozzle breaks out and all Nature becomes startled and pained.. He puts. oh more steam, throws the wind into another flue, an...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
OBESITY AN AID TO BUSINESS. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 27 October 1899

OBESITY AN AID TO BUSINESS That extreme corpulency' has its business advantages it is quite impossible to deny. Like the man with the wooden leg who hired himself out to a gardener and made holes in the earth as he walked about ready for the insertion of bulbs, the ingenious fat man frequently turns his stoutness to profitable account. Arthur Orton,of Tichborne fame, has been for some time the attraction to a modest tobacconist's shop. Probably half of his customers come in not so much in search of the soothing weed, but to satisfy their curi osity with a peep at the prodigy behind the counter. One of the most astive fat men on record is au American gentleman of some consider able weight in his own, or any other, country, and who represents in England a Transatlan tic firm of cycle makers. Only twenty-three years of age, he weighs thirty six stone and is six feet and a half in height. With the name of the wheel which he is literally " pushing "-for he is an expert cyclist written ac...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Transvaal War. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 27 October 1899

The Transvaal War. I Di. FiaBchi will proceed to war as Cap tain of-the Army Medical Corps. There is a faint hope of the recovery of Major-General Sir W. Benn Symons, who was wounded in the groin at the battle of Glencoe. Private L. Turnbull, of the 5th Regiment 41 A" Company, and a native of Sackville Beach, has been accepted for service in South Africa. Private F. J. Ezzy, of Bichmond " D " Company 3rd Infantry Regiment, has been accepted for service, in South Africa. War rant-Officer Molloy (late of Richmond), of the Permanent Staff, has also been accepted: Several other members of the Windsor and Bichmond Companies have offered their ser vices, but have not yet passed the necessary medical examination.

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 27 October 1899

STOP I LOOK AT THIS ! ! 3^ >TE0T10N1ST& BUY at the ECONOMIC STOßES and "KEEP THE MONEY. IN THE DISTRICT." FREETRADERS. BUY IN THE BEST MARKET viz., "THE ECONOMIC* -^EVERYBODY* Tour Orders Along. We are Waiting For Them-_ DICK BROTHERS, ECONOMIC STORES, [ItCAULFIELD AND MELBOURNE CUT. CHEAPEST and BEST place for Boots and Shoes. ^O-A-XJX* AT TSE. «MOND BOOT COMPANY. ÜÜALITY OF QPR BOOTS ONLY CHANGES FOR THE BETTER, |gi A 'Good Utting Boot or Shoe is the basis of an erect and graceful carriage. ies' Tau Summer Boots and Shoes are cooling to the feet. Owing: ip, the LOW PEIOES we charge for Boots and i^x0âÊ^t it will be necessary to give your order so as to enable us to complete your order for the arning Xmas Holidays. f^NoTB.-We "Sell Gloss for Boots and Shoes atéjd per bottle. "SSC, tami Boot Company, R. S. DYER. - THE tokesburg Adpocate ^BEAL LIVE TALKING MACHINE. [ED EVERY FRIDAY.. m ha X)f us probably, if you have not you WILL. -o LVE A THOROUGHLY UP-TO-DATE iANT FOR EX...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CHAPTER XLIX. ONCE MORE AFLOAT. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 27 October 1899

CHAPTER XLIX. ONCE MORE AFLOAT. Basil Barton well knew jost where he could pick up a crew of desperate men, ready for any deadly work/ He entered the port by night, and at once sought an agent with whom he had had dealings. * I need forty men at any cost, at once, and they must be well armed and teady for any work,' was his order to his agent. With this incentive the agent went tb work, and within three hours he had collected two-score as ugly set of villains as ever were banded together. They went at once on board the carrera, were hustled into the hold out of sight, and the vessel set sail. Thirty-six hours more and she run into the retreat of the pirates. Upon giving up his vessel, Basil had turned her over to his young officer, and made him chief, as it were, of the island rendezvous, upon which had settled a small number of people. The crew had married in various ports, and they had brought their wives and children with them, and so quite a little settlement had been formed, th...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE RICHMOND SCHOOL OF ARTS. Flower Show. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 27 October 1899

THE RICHMOND SCHOOL OF ARTS. i :: Flower Show. ; Notwithstanding the unfavorable climatic condition which prevailed in Bfcn^mpnd and the surrounding district on Friday lastra fairly large concourse of visitors - and Hawkesburyites putin an appearance at the flower show held in the Ähool of Arts; Bichmpnd, on that date. The hall presented a lovely picture and the many pretty dresses worn by the ladies present added consider-, ably to the number of other attractions Arrangements had been made by the-com mittee, assisted by ffce energetic secrefcfy< Mr. E. Campbell, to ^welcome the Ministerial party on their arrival at'the railway station. The Mayor, Mr. J. HUI, accompanied by the Bev. J. "Howell:; Price and "oi&ers pro ceeded to ttíestationrhen,onthearri val of the guests, the Mayor, ina few well-chosen words, welcomed them on'behalf of the residen ta and the Bev. Mr. Bice, on behalf of the committee and meiabers of the School of Arts, as President oithe institution...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WINDSOR LITERARY AND DEBATING SOCIETY. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 27 October 1899

^WINDSOR LITERARY AND DE BATING SOCIETY. Qn Xaesaay evening last, at the invitation &§ft ' ~ nf Mr. J. Padley, Tre3sur..r r f the Society, S§|-"-.?r the members and friends a*>d leading rési lié "-' dents of the districts were given a treat by " way of a phonographic entertainment, con SÊê£ " ¿noted by Mr. W. A. Bogers, of the Ameri |§|^;?*an Phonographic Parlor, Queen Victoria ¡gp h. Markets, Sydney. Hr. J. J. Paine, President S@*V of the Society, occupied the chair. A splen |pfy";>^-:oüd programme was given, including senti É||¿.\';- mental and comic songs, trombone, picólo, g^'fcWbanjo, clarionette, and xylophone .solo, or H& -Jfî ebestral selections, talking, etc., the recordé 1^-; 5"'.being Bplendid, and perfectly audible at any portion of the hall. Daring the evening Mr. Wt'7" * "T. Orr recited "The Charge of the Light gc- - Brigade," which waa afterwards reproduced Jfe^through the phonograph. Many of the items bjSí^ given were very popular, and evoked ap...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Last of the Pirates; OR, DOOM DRIVEN. A Romance of the End of Ocean Outlawry. BY COL PRENTISS INGRAHAM, Author of "Merle the Mutineer," &c, &c. CHAPTER XLVI. THE SECRET REVEALED. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 27 October 1899

The Last of the Pirates; OR, »OOM! DRIVBUbT. -?- i A. Romance of the End of Ocean Outlawry-* -> Bv COL PRENTISS INGRAHAM, Author of " Merle the Mutineer," &c, &c --* CHAPTER XLVI. THE SECRET REVEALED. Trie morning broke rainy and dismal at the home of the fugitive maiden. Mr. and Mrs: Leslie had been away from home for days, visiting a relative, and only the day before had returned. They sought their daughter's room, and there, upon -tier bureau, pinned to a silken pin-cushion, were two , _ notes, one being addressed "To Father - and Mother," the other rtTo Kate Randolph." The note to his wife and himself the planter quickly broke open, which stated that she had .gone away with Basila Bartona, who had promised to make her his wife. The letter, in which she begged ]: forgivenoess, was evidently written under great excitement. Mr. Leslie read it to his wife, /who listened with bowed head and/ trembling form. Their sorrow at the flight of their daughter, their only c...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WINNING A WOMAN. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 27 October 1899

[ WINNING A WOMAN. There was » slight tap en the door, «nd Hiss j Hardaway entered the library with a little rush. She looked anxiously round, and then made a step towards me. I dropped mr lnnglntm on my knee and looked at her ; evidently she had come en some pressing business. She looked rather excited ; also a trifle nervous. «. Hr. Tyson ?" said she. " Miss Hardaway ?» said I. " 1-1 want to have a talk with yon about about something which--" She hesitated. *. Certainly," I responded amiably ; " wont you sit down ?" She sank into a chair opposite me and re» garded me with dubious eyes. ** I hope you won't think it extraordinary of me," sha said in a sort of stammer. " If 1 could do anything," I observed, to re assure her, ** command mc" She averted her eyes and fidgeted with a -book en the table. " You see," she explained, " it's rather deli cate " .' Exactly," I assented. " And-and 1 don't know, bat I'm sure it's it's mtber dreadful." " Good,*' said I ; *. tilings are so flat as ...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A MARVELLOUS STORY. SAWNEY BEANE, THE SCOTTISH CANNIBAL A THOUSAND TRAVELLERS [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 27 October 1899

j A MARVELLOUS STORY. SAWNEY BEANE, THE SCOTTISH CANNIBAL A THOUSAND TRAVELLERS Trrr.T.'gfi AND EATEN. The bombie story of Sawney Besne has bean revived by the description of the geog given ie Hr. Crockett's " Great Man." Sawney Beaoe was a Scotchman who, in the early part ef the reign of James the Sixth *f Scotland and First of England, that is to sar, between 1567 and 1603, revived the inhuman practice alleged to have been common among bis countrymen in St. Jerome's days. Sawner. whose proper name was Alexander Bain, was born in tLe neighbourhood of Traoent or Preston-pans, ht East Lothian, about eight or nine miles east of Edinburgh. His father was a hedger and ditcher, and ^ his mother was a notable spinnpr on ber tittie wheel. Sawney, when »ld enough to carry a hedge-bill-or a spade, was taken out to the fields by his father to assist him. bat he liked banting rabbits on the links tar better, having, as it seemed a con stitutional disinclination to any settled honest industry. ...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HIS RECOMPENSE. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 27 October 1899

HIS RECOMPENSE. FINISHED st last !" Martin Bruce spoke the «ords with a sigh of utter weaiineaa ?>^s_ and lifted hi* SC* head from hi« work, taking the tnagnifyingglasa from one eje as be did so. Upon the table before him «rsa a large steel plate, on which be bad engraved a design re quiring the most delicate and careful work, and to which he had gives several days of con tinuous labour. " That poor child," he muttered, and listen ed to a sound of suppressed sobbing coming from above his half opened door. With the clouds still upon bis face he went to the landing and looked up the narrow stair case leading to the attic. As he expected, he saw the little figure crouched upon the upper stair, the head low over folded arms, with bare feet. The sobbing, though distinctly audible, was evident!» carefully choked down. *' Trixy !" Martín said in a low tone. In a moment the child was beside bim. with a quick, darting motion that suited well the slender figure, thin to painful angularity,...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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