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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

-iwr-y T ' THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 81 wards, his face was flushed, his eyes wore moist and heavy, and his step was not quite so firm as it had heon. When lie got back to the place where he had loft his gang, ho found that they had resumed work, and ho was about to throw himself down in the shade of a rock to dozo off the effects of the liquor he had taken, when he noticed that the sullen Italian whom he had remarked sitting apart during dinner hour was missing. "Where is Giuseppe Bonani?" he asked, in very good Italian, stepping into the midst of the gang and looking about him angrily. No ono knew what had become of him, and the irate foreman went away to hunt him up. "Just as T thought," said he to him self a few moments later, when ho came upon the delinquent Bonani in the act of taking a siesta in a sheltered nook among the rocks. "Here, you lazy vagabond, get up and get to work," he called out, stirring the man with the toe of his boot. Bonani did not move, and Conway stooped down ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

7jjljw p$ 'JMVyp 82 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. i the greater part of that time he was far away from priest and church, and it. had not been possible for him to do so. Now, to his surprise, he found himself very much disinclined to em brace the opportunity that Providence had placed in his way When the last of his men had come from the tent lie was still undecided, and finally compromised witli his con science by telling himself that there would be time enough to go in the morning before Mass. It might not, perhaps, be just to say that he had made up his mind to gratify his passion for liquor that night, and so could not approach the confessional with the proper dispositon ; but certain it is that the knowledge that he was in a position to gratify it had an indirect influence upon him, though he would not acknowledge, even to himself, that such was the case. However, he re tired to the hut without having been to confession, and, sad to say, got help lessly intoxicated before he fell asleep...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

mmmmmmmmmmm TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 88 the pines when Dan Conway awoko with a start, and sat upright in his bed. " Merciful heaven, what a dream! " ho muttered, wiping the cold sweat from his brow and peering around him in the gloom. All was stillness and darkness, out side the flood of moonlight that streamed upon his face, and, after listening intently for a few moments, he lay back with a look of relief. As his alarm subsided he began to experi ence a sense of physical discomfort. His throat was hot and dry, his tongue swollen and parched, and his head ached violently. "Phew! how hot it is in here," ho grumbled beneath his breath, turning over restlessl' and putting out one hand to feel for the jar of liquor that ho had left close beside the bed. In stead of the jar, his hand came in contact with the knife Bonani had dropped, and he lifted it up and looked at it suspiciously. The Italian, to render his grasp of the weapon more firm, had wrapped around it the red and yellow scarf he ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

si THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. emotion ho fell on his knees and bowed his head upon the scapular, praying incoherently. Gently and lovingly the Heart of Jesus drew that poor stumbling soul back to Himself, dissipating the clouds of unreasoning terror and smoothing the thorny path of repentance. Through the silent watches of the night until the grey dawn, he knelt there ; then, as the darkness gave way to the first flush of daybreak, he rose, dressed himself and went away to walk up and down outside the mis sionary's tent until he could hear him stirring within. Ho had not been waiting long when he heard a sound inside the canvas walls; and approach ing the entrance, he was about to beg permission to enter, when the door was drawn aside and he stood face to face with Giuseppe Bonani. Both men halted and eyed each other with a look that was as intelligent as comprehensive. Then Dan Conway averted his head, made a gesture of dismissal with his hand and disappeared into the tent, leaving the I...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

!P"PPHIIWIilH TW' WJ INDIAN ADVOCATE. 35 IVftf'H'f On the inner man nature and revela tion, collectively or separately, we must depend to settle inquiry. Man is born into existence, opens his eyes upon the universe of nature, per ceives, reflects, wills ancj acts. He walks up and down this vast ompire of incar nated ideas, an appointed heir and un disputed tenant. Nothing denies him a right to the truths of nature, the beauty of the landscape, or their im plied wisdom and virtue. lie goes mingling with the multitudes down through the deep, dense forests, across boundless plains, over rough and rugged mountains, meditating in reverential awe upon the things that surround him. The story of the earth is written in the book of nature. lie opens its great lids and reads from the pages of rocks; lie discovers atoms, laws, forces, and muses over its picture pages from particle to planet. Tf he looks at the lofty moun tain, towering as nature's citadel above him, he shudders, and asks what ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

'WWSRJWW'imPJMWW f3ta V d. ' v ' " ' - v 56 ?! INDIAN ADVOCATE. passages. All is silence, the waves un intelligible; but thought so connects all and so interprets the very silence itself that mystic monuments and cities rise up, and vast mountains are torn away; it makes the marble live and breathe; it makes the air pulsate with strains of music; it weighs the universe and finds its equilibrium requires a planet out yonder, then it makes a tele scope and finds the planet; it constructs all sorts of machines and starts them running on its errands the circle is complete from nature started to na ture returned. History is a picture still painting on the page of natural events. Away in the background, fading into the twi light of antiquity, is a vast pile of mounds, temples and towers, without name. Just within the shades of the unwritten ages are Ninevah, Troy, Babylon, Egypt, Greece. Here Thales, Heraclitus, Anaxagoras, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Homer and a confounding host are stre...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

f. Tif" iiTjr mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 87 H an otornal truth, and ho sits silont and undisturbod till his problem is solved; then he wakes up again inlo the natural world. Ho looks out into the world of natural truths andovonts; he flies back to the beginning; ho goes down to the end; ho stands before the infinite, the eternal, the invisible; the intangible nature touches the senses, the senses touch the soul, the soul touches the eternal. But whence came this body with its bones and various apparatuses? Let us fancy ourselves in the midst of a world's fair of human inventions. Here we are by a prodigious heap of books, suliicient to paper the face of the con tinents; gathered together are all the paintings that have ever hung upon the walls of human habitation, all the sculp ture creative genius has produced; col lected here is every invention for amusement, learning and wealth. Now ask yourself, is it satisfactory to sup pose that the atoms composing your body and al...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

7 mmmtimgmmmm t ; "Ts 'fr- '" 88 TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. At length in the morning ho rises to a clear sky and a happy heart, for the difficulty is solved; and as he goes fortli anew, he wonders what angel touched the springs of his soul during sleep. Memory, will, reason, worked silently away unconscious of the body. We see faces and forms, hear voices, remember events, talk with departed friends, go on journeys, rejoice at good news, re ceive sad messages, awake and find it a dream. "We were conscious of ourselves but not of our bodies, and now that we are awake remember each particular. Something acted while the body slept. Some agent, as Plato has observed, must rouse the body from its sleep, push back the curtain from the window of the soul and let in the light of day. At this stage it is affirmed by materi alism that our thoughts are only the images of natural objects hung on the walls of memory. This would make life nothing save a train of Hying im pressions. Not all the scenes o...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

7t"rwl7 V3" ;i i "",i?i;iflT-"yW '"'W - ! J" T- -r 2!Hi5 INDIAN ADVOCATE. 89 friend. This ho frooly did. Nay, Ho did more. Ho died for His enemies, carrying heroic sacrifice to the greatest possiblo extreme. Shall any one dare to doubt the divinity of Christ in the presence of this stupenduous miracle of love? The very elements revolted against the impious and unbelieving who railed and blasphemed against Him, while His li.fe-blood ebbed away on Calvary. The earth was veiled in darkness ; the rocks were rent in twain and all nature mourned over the awful crime of deicide ; while men asked for miracles, in their blindness and hard ness of heart, they failed to perceive that the great act of expiation transpir ing before their eyes was the miracle of all time, the memory of which should never be forgotten and the eflects of which should endure forever. But to be practical, what is our conduct in respect to this royal heartod lover? Are we among those who openly profess Him before men,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

00 THE INDlAtf ADVOCATE. he impiously claims, yet he enlists many followers in his service. How different is the conduct of Jesus. While invested with dominion over the entire earth, He makes no apportion ment of it to His followers. It is not in cluded in His royal gifts. He has some thing better to offer. The Son of Man hath not whereon to lay His head. Shall the servant desire or crave for what the Master did not possess? Jesus detached Himself from nil things in heaven and on earth for our sake He annihilated, so to speak, His very divinity in assum ing our fallen nature. Shall we not detach ourselves from the perishable things of this earth for His dear sake, when by so doing we at the same time serve our own best interest? This sac rifice, if such it be on our part, is the lesson of His life. It is no other than the acceptance of the cross which He bore so meekly for love of us. "We can not hope to be friends with the world and Christ at the same time. In sub mitting to the pa...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 91 "smartness" is gone. Ho who once delighted in overreaching others is now the jest or scorn of those who know him. He is known to the street boys as a common loafer, and ho is not ashamed of it. In another year he is in the jail or lunatic asylum ; and shortly after is buried at the expense of the public. This sketch is a truthful description of a character not uncommon in Amer ican cities even among the children of nominally Catholic parents. What is to be done with such you'ng men? or, rather, what is to be done with the parents, who are responsible, before God, for their rearing? RICHES AND FRIENDSHIP. A certain man of vast estate, And generous mind withal, So freely spent it on his friends, He soon had none at all. His fickle friends discovered this, And then their worth they showed ; They left him ; nor e'en paid the debt Of gratitude they owed. Ere long the man got rich again Much richer than before ; And those who then received so much Came now expectin...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

92 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. I to her. St. Thomas Aquinas has said that "of all prayers the most meritori ous, the most acceptable to God are the prayers for the dead, because they im ply all the works of charity, both cor poral and spiritual." Bourdalou says to open heaven to these souls "Is an apostolate more no ble, more meritorious than the conver sion of sinners, even of heathens. " How often have novenas made for their relief obtained for us the wished for favor when the Blessed Virgin and St. Joseph were appealed to in vain, thus showing they wished us to pray for their suffering children. And we have the comforting assurance they will not forget us. "0 Lord, vouchsafe to reward those who assist us! return hundredfold bless ings to those who help us, and introduce us into the light of heaven." This is the prayer of St. Bridget, heard as she was being guided by an angel through Purgatory. They will, as it were, form a bodyguard around us, helping us from danger, assisting us in our...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

The Indian Advocate A Quarterly Review, devoted to the Interests of Indian Missions. Vol. VIII. OCTOBER, 1896. No. 4. Writton for tlio Advocate. SOME ADVANTAGES OF COLLEGE LIFE. By D. T. M. Few of the average class of people rightly consider the advantages of col lege life. In this age of ours, so far advanced inintellectual culture, a young man, destitute of early college training, feels but imperfectly equipped to begin the battles of life, and incapable of winning distinction among his fellow men. It is, however, an unfortunate fact, and one of too frequent occurrence, that scarcely has a young man arrived at a certain age than he is forced into tho wide world before he has received the -scantiest foundation of intellect ual acquirements. Lot the causes be what they may, it is only the young man of careful college training that can have a true idea of the loss there by sustained. "The education of an individual is coincident with the life of that individual," for which reason eve...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

1 ? u THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. iVSS?l the hands of unprincipled men; it will prove more of a demon than a God. Hence the necessity of sending children to a college, strictly moral and religious in character, where correct ideas of the spirit and essence of religion may be inculcated into their youthful minds. By this means and this means only will they be preserved from the corrup tion of the world and their morals be of the purest kind. LITERARY SOCIETIES are other advantages peculiar to college life. In our time, unless a man is a member of some kind of society or or ganization, he is virtually isolated from his fellow-men, and depends upon him self, solitary and alone. Little to be feared in this regard of a young man of college training. There he not only learns the rules of society but cultivates a habit fitting for ease and ready ad dress. What profit to a student to have a colossal memory, a copious supply of words, an abundance of timely figures if he can not express himself eit...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 95 given time. Those results are increased excellence in academic work. In fact, there is no other system by which we are instilled so thoroughly in order, patience, punctuality, cheerful obedi ence, respect for our superiors, physical adroitness, a sense of duty, honor and manliness. But while great attention is given to the cultivation of the mind, THE CORPORAL EXERCISES are not overlooked. In truth, many assert that it is in the college princi pally that the young man can find means of amusement, and that without undermining in the least his course of studies. Every kind of enjoyment is resorted to at the proper time that the student's mind may be relieved from constant application. Physical culture receives continuous and careful notice. Nothing in short that serves to promote the health of the student is left untried. All these, with regular repasts, such as the ordinary boy seldom finds at home, even repose regulated ; in fine, all that tends to make life ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

1 c 96 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ' mt''rTrT ceremony bring to us the presence of Almighty God, that it seemed at any moment His voice might break the awful silence which prevailed after the pronouncing of the vows. This silence but not the awe, was soon interrupted by the joyful voices of the newly pro fessed chanting the psalm, " Eructavit cor meum vorbum bonum. My heart hath uttered a good word." Their chanting strikingly recalled those other words of Holy Scripture. " They shall follow the lamb, whithersoever he goeth." At the close of the psalm the new ly professed prostrated, and silence reigned again, but for a short time only for the " Te Deum " soon pealed forth. Scarcely had this joyful hymn of thanksgiving died away, when the re ligious intoned the psalm " Ecce quam bonum, et quam jucundum, habitare fratres in unum." Behold how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to to dwell together in unity." The cere mony was now closed, and as we left the holy scene, we too felt that "...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 97 Catholic missionaries. They but re tained an "implacable hatred against the race which had robbed them both of their lands and their religion," says Shea. They became the scourge of the paleface in the South. "The Seminoles," says the same au thor, "are a striking monument of the different results obtained by the Cath olic government of Spain and the Prot estant government of England. The one converted the savages into Chris tians a quiet, orderly, industrious race living side by side with the Spaniards themselves in peace and comfort ; the other replunged the same tribes into barbarism and paganism, and converted them into a fearful scourge of her own colonies." Millions of dollars and thousands of lives were lost in futile efforts to recon quer them. They refused to emigrate westward in 1S35, and oven went so far as to massacre the United States troops sent to effect their removal. At this time they numbored only 2000 warriors, not including the negro slave...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

5 98 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. "black robes." They hear only the word of profligate preachers, whose one aim is to swindle the poor Indians. The Seminoles have long forgotten those saintly missionaries who watered the Floridan soil with their blood. They no longer remember America's first apostles and martyrs martyrs to the savage ferocity of in christianized In dians. They fail to recognize the min isters of the Roman Catholic Church as the only true shepherds of Christ. May God in His divine mercy have pity on them, and may He enlighten their souls in the ways of truth. UNCLE SAM'S RED WARDS. Commissioner Browning Very Hopeful for Lo The Indian Commissioner Says the Child of the Prairies Is Learn ing to Work Out His Own Civilization. United States Commissioner of In dian Affairs Daniel M. Browning arrived in St. Louis from Washington on his way to the Pacific Coast on a tour of inspection of the Indian agencies that come under his direction and control. He is accompanied by Mrs. Browni...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 99 ceive from $1.00 to $1.50 a day for their labor. Tho government is now engaged in parceling out tho lands, and giving to each of tho Indians who will work a farm. The tribal ownership of lands has proven to be a bad thing, as it breeds idleness, and leads all to believe that tho government will take care of them if they are in need. Under tho system of parceling out the land it is the idea to teach the Indians that those who endeavor to help themselves will receive aid from the government, and that those who do not will not be aided. When one of them is given a farm he is told to go to work, and that all he raises and all he can earn out of the farm will be his, and no one else will be entitled to share in it. This has the desired effect in most cases, and some of them have buckled down to hard work, and are not only self-supporting, but are laying by a lit tle money for the proverbial rainy day. This has encouraged the government to go ahead with the work of...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1896

p1" -vrv -fej " '" ''' ' ' ''utitI iriii5fp,'?rv-rt"f,-' '"wto i90 Tfi" INDIAN ADVOCATE. Superior Excellence of Christian Education. In the busy walks of life and in the wild rush for material wealth, men too easily pass over the fact that man is the greatest being in this world, and that the best part of him is the im material. They are apt to place too high a value on a hurried and utili-tarion-like system of education, paying little heed as to what kind of men are turned out in society. Too little re flection is often given to the subject of properly educating young men for the business of life, and the work of ef ficiently preparing youth for life in its whole and entire scope too little con sidered. It must not be forgotten that character is never infused by mere mental cultivation or by ordinary dis cipline alone; the whole school must breathe the spirit of pure life and refine ment, secular training combined with the moral and Christian in perfect form, and the scholar prepar...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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