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Elephind.com contains 12,580 items from National Tribune, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 8 October 1881

r : il. '" - a . ! V .- Vf" "TO CARE FOR HIM WHO HAS BORNE THE BATTUE, AND FOR HIS WIDOW AND ORPHANS." ESTABLISHED 1877. WASHINGTON, D. C, SATUEDAY, OCTOEEE S, 1881. " NEW SERIES. VOL-1., 2J-o. 3. GEN. SHERMAN'S LETTER. WHAT GENERAL ROSECRANS SAYS OF IT His Version of What O'arfleM Iiil at CIiirKamaucsi. Historic Lies And the Truth of Historj. Let Us JIate AH the Facts. General W. S. Rosecrans, member of Congress elect from California, writes to the editor of the San Francisco Chronicle, under date of September "20, as follows: I think that my whole life attests any reluctance to obtrude my personality upon public attention, especially in times of general anxiety or sorrow. In proof of this 1 need only recall to vour memorv and that of vour readers the autumn of 1863. when, after the glorious cam paign of Chattanooga. I was relieved from the command of the Army of the Cumberland. To prepare the public mind to accept that unpopular which was not to be had on that hotly-contested fiel...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 8 October 1881

THE NATIONAL TBIBUNE V ASHINGTON, D. C, OCTOBEB 8, 1881. For The National Tribunk. OBLIVION. A stalwart tree fell in the forest at midnight, And crushed a tender violet growing beneath its shade: The morning appeared with its glittering crown of sun- And sweet the fragrant memory of the flower tilled the glade. A manly form went down in the midst of battle, And crushed a tender, wifely, womanly heart as It fell : The morrow came on, and the innocent childish prattle Of A if sweet picture tenderly poured blest comfort in love's well. The ivv twined about the tree that had perished. And flourished bravely, hiding the ruin that lay beneath, And sorrow drew back from the heart that had mourned, and tho' cherish'd, The form that fell in the battle was veiled by a new love's wreath. THE IRON SHROUD. JY WILLIAM 3IlTDF0Itn. The castle of the Prince of Tolfi was built on the summit of the towering and precipitous rock of Scylla, and commanded a magnificent view of Sicily in all its grandeur....

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 8 October 1881

THE NATIONAL TRIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, OCTOBER 8, 1881. THE HERO OF THE COMMUNE. AN IXCIDKST OF THE PAKIS fclEGE. VB8. JdABOJLR&r J. rREWTw RIDKER'S MOSTHLY. I. " Gakcon ! You ?om, Snared alonp with this cursed crew? (Onlv a child, and yet so bold, Scarcely as much as ten years-old) Do you hear? Do you know Why the gendarmes put you thore, in the row J'ow with those Communo wretches tall, Willi race to the wall?" ii. ' ' Know? 'To be sure I know ! Why not? We're here to be shot. And there bv the pillar's the very spot. Fighting: for France, my father fell. Ah, well ! That's just the way I -would choose to fall. With my buck to the wall J " - m. "'(Sucre! Fair, open fight, 1 say, Is right magnificent in its way, And fine for -warming the blood ; but who Wants wolfish -work like this to do? Bah ! 'Tis a butcher's business.) How (The boy is beckoning to me now; I knew his poor child's heart would fail: Yet his cheek's not pale.) Quick! Say your say; for don't you see, When the ehu...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 8 October 1881

4 THE NATIONAL TKIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, OCTOBIH 8, 1881. The National Tribune PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. TO CARE FOR HIM WHO HAS BORNE THE BATTLE, AND FORHIS VIDOW AND ORPHANS." ABRAHAM LINCOLN. ONE COPY, ONE YEAR FIVE COPIES " Terms to Subscribers, Payable in Advance: (postage prepaid) $1.50 - 6.25 ONE COPY THREE MONTHS ----- 50 ONE COPY SIX MONTHS ----- 75 TEN COPIES, (with extra copy to getter-up of club,) 12.5? A SPECIMEN NUMBER of our paper sent free on request. TERMS FOR ADVERTISING furnished upon application. TO SUBSCRIBERS. When changing your ADDRESS PLEASE GIVE FORMER AS WELL AS PRESENT ADDRESS, WITH COUNTY AND STATE. 5TAKE NOTICE IN SENDING MONEY FOR SUB SCRIPTIONS BY MAIL, NEVER INCLOSE THE CURRENCY EXCEPT IN A REGISTERED LETTER. A POSTAL MONEY ORDER OR A DRAFT ON NEW YORK IS THE BEST FORM OF REMITTANCE. LOSSES BY MAIL WILL BE MOST SURELY AVOIDED IF THESE DIRECTIONS ARE FOL LOWED. j&sno responsibility is assumed for subscrip tions paid to agents, which must be at the...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 8 October 1881

THE NATIONAL TBIBlXtfE: AVASHEtfGTOK, D. C, OCTOBER 8, 1881. THE LARGEST FARM IN THE WORLD. A letter from Fargo, D. T., says: Can you im agine a wheat field of 30.000 acres? Thirty thousand acres of slender golden stems, each hearing a cluster of yellow heads, "bowing and nodding as if in acknowledgment of admiring glances. If you cannot fancy such n picture, you perhaps will admit that it must he one of the most sublime scenes the human eye can witness. I stood this morning at the centre of the larg est piece of territory ever cultivated under the direction of a single man. As far as the eye could reach, north, south, cast, or west, there was nothing visible but the bluest of blue sky. the reddest of red barns, the great awkward-looking threshers, with their smoke-begrimed engines beside them, the whirring harvesters, and miles nfter miles of wheat. If tills farm were stretched out like a ribbon, half a mile wide, it would reach as far as from Chicago to Milwaukee. If it "were in a...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 8 October 1881

THE NATIONAL TEIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, OCTOBER 8, 1881 A BIT OF A SERMON. Whatsoe'er you find to do, Do it, boys, with nil your might! Never be n little true, Or a little in the right. Trifles even Lead to heaven, Trifles make the life of man ; So in all things, Great or small things, Be ay thorough as you can. Let no speck their surface dim Spotless truth and honor bright! I'd not give a fig for him Who says any lie is white. lie who falters, Twists or alters Little atoms when we speak, May deceived be, But lMilieve me, To himself he a sneak. Help the weak if you are strong. Love the old if you are young: Own a fault if you are wrong. If you're angry hold your tongue. In each duty Lias a beauty. If your eyes you do not shut; Just as Mi rely And securely As a kernel in a nut. Love with all your heart and soul, Love with eye and car and touch. That's the moral of the whole. You can never love too much ! 'Tis the glory Of the story In our babyhood begun, Our hearts without it, (Never...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 8 October 1881

THE RATIONAL TBIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. 0., OCTOBER 8, 1881. LONGINGS. 3n mist and gloom the daylight swiftly dies; Tlie city lumps shine out along the street ; No reaper glory charms the weary eyes ; No leafy murmurs make the gloaming sweet. "Ah, me! the tranquil evening hours," she cried, "Amid the rushes by the riverside ! "The busy feet forever come and go; The sounds of work and strife are never still. Oh ! for the grassy pastures green and low, The strawberry blossom and the daffodil ! How peacefully the mellow sunshine died Amid the rushes by the riverside! "I loved the toil amid those reedy shades, At sunrise or at sunset, gay and light; The song of waters and the laugh of maids Come back to me in happy dreams at night. 0 blessed hours ! when, free from care and pride, 1 bound the rushes by the riverside! "This is no dwelling-place for hearts like mine Hearts that arc born for freedom and for rest. Ah, me ! to sec the marshy meadows shine In the low sunlight of the saffron west...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 8 October 1881

THE NATIONAL TRIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, OCTOBER 8, 1881, t For The National Tribune. SLEEP BRINGETH REST. Sleep bringeth rest to wearied forms Worn down by labor's grinding heel, Or buflctings of angry storms Life bends to man for woe or weal Sleep bringetli rest ! Sleep bringeth rest ! To tired forms, sweet sleep is blest. Sleep bringetli rest to wearied eyes Grown dim with looking on the past, OrXorsonie future Paradise Where life may find repose at last Sleep bringeth rest ! Sleep bringeth rest ; To eyes grown dim, sweet sleep is blest. Sleep bringeth rest to wearied hearts O'crburdened by their weight of care, Or pierced by sorrow's cruel darts, Or struggling with a grim despair Sleep bringeth ret ! Sleep bringeth rest ! To wearied hearts, sweet sleep is blest. Sleep bringeth rest; but not to all. Not all who woo its soft embrace May find repose within its thrall From care and ev'ry sorrow's trace Sleep bringeth rest, and sleep is blest ; But not to all doth sleep bring rest. Sl...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 15 October 1881

j "ff yf "p" r !! ' ' ,i ' ' I TO CARE FOR HIM WHO HAS BORNE THE BATTLE, AND FOR HIS WIDOW AND ORPHANS." WASHIKGTW, D. C, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1881. ESTABLISHED 1877 NEW SERIES . Yol. L No. 9. UNITED STATES SENATE. ITS RECENT MEETING IN SPECIAL SESSION. Opening l'roreodiiig-Thc Election of a Presiding Offlwr pro trm The Democrats take Control. Nei .Senators Sworn lu. On Monday, the 10th inst, agreeably, to the President's proclamation, the Senate met in spe cial session at the Capitol. All the Senators were in attendance. Senator Bayard, of Delaware, was, after some discussion, chosen President pro tern., and immediately entered upon the duties of his office." There was some little dehate as to the admission of the new Senators from New York and Khode Island, after which an adjournment was had until the following day. On Tuesday, when the Senate met, Senator Edmunds immedi ately after the journal had been read, moved that the oath of office he administered to Senator-elect Nelson W...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 15 October 1881

THE STATIOSTAIi TBIBOTE: WASHINGTON, D. C, OCTOBER 15, 1881, MINE AND THINE. Every wedding, says the proverb, Slakes another, soon or lute; Never yet was any marriage Entered in the book of fate, But the names were also writl-eu Of the patient pair that wait. Blessings, then, upon the morning When my friend, with fondest look, By the solemn rite's permission, To himself his mibtress took, And the destinies recorded Other two within their book. While the priest fulfilled his oiliee, Still the ground the lovers eyod, And the parents and the kinsmen Aimed their glances at the bride; But the groomsmen eyed the virgins Who were waiting at her side. Three there were that stood leside her One was dark and one was fair, But nor dark nor fair the other, Save her Arab eyes and hair; Keither dark nor' fair I call her, Yet she was the fairest there. While her groomsman shall I own it ? Yes, to thee, and only thee Gazed upon this dark-eyed maiden, Who w:is fairest of the three. Thus he thought "...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 15 October 1881

THE XATIOKAX TBIBTJNE: WASHLKTGITON', D. 0., OCTOBER 15, 1881. 3 THE DESERTED MILL. Drip, drip, drip, The eager flow is still, And only drops of Avater fall Beneath the unused mill. All mouldy are the bags of meal, And moss is grown upon the wheel, So silent and so still. Drip, drip, drip, Upon the fruitful fern; The silent timbers of the wheel Are powerless to turn ; And where a blade of grass is seen, The gaping joints it grows between, Parted, will not return. Drip, drip, drip, Into the stagnant pool "Where glides the spotted water snake, Among the cresses eool, And, silent in his coat of mail, All slimy ereeps the cautious snail Upon the window stool. Drip, drip, drip, L'ion the onlcon floor, Ami broken from its rusty look, HiuiK Mlentiy the door; Smvc, when ti jcum. of wind jeoos j54, It jrros HjKMt oih? liiwjfe it ill ft Then rkit 5 n.-fore. Drift, drip, drip, Vtm the rotten dewl ; lVH-ctM tbf tJtlHr mi the roof The f4Kows softly sd. AihI from h corner of tho houstt Silly poei...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 15 October 1881

4 THE NATIONAL TRIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, OCTOBER 15, 1881. The National Tribune PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. To CARE FOR HIM WHO HAS BORNE THE BATTLE, AND FOR HIS WKJOW AND ORPHANS." ABRAHAM LINCOLN. Terms to Subscribers, Payable in Advance: (postage prepaid) ONE COPY, ONE YEAR FIVE COPIES " $1.50 - 6.25 ONE COPY THREE MONTHS ----- 50 ONE COPY SIX MONTHS ----- 75 TEN COPIES, (with extra copy to getter-up of club,) 12.50 A SPECIMEN NUMBER of our paper sent free on request. TERMS FOR ADVERTISING furnished upon application. J$3TO SUBSCRIBERS. When changing your ADDRESS PLEASE GIVE FORMER AS WELL AS PRESENT ADDRESS, WITH COUNTY AND STATE. -83-TAKE NOTICE. In sending money for sub scriptions BY MAIL, NEVER INCLOSE THE CURRENCY EXCEPT IN A REGISTERED LETTER. A POSTAL MONEY ORDER OR A DRAFT ON NEW YORK IS THE BEST FORM OF REMITTANCE. LOSSES BY MAIL WILL BE MOST SURELY AVOIDED IF THESE DIRECTIONS ARE FOL LOWED. 8no responsibility is assumed for subscrip tions paid to agents, which must be at ...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 15 October 1881

THE ISTATIOKAL TRIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, OCTOBER 15, 1881. 5 k CHARACTERISTIC DISPATCH. The following dispatch was sent by President Lincoln to General Hooker, while the latter com manded the Army of the Potomac : Wasiuxotos:, D. C., June 5, 1363. Major-General Hookek, Yours of to-day was received an hour ago. bo much of professional military skill is requisite to answer it, that I have turned the task over to General Halleck. 1 1 e promises to perform it with his utmost care. 1 have hut one idea which I think worth suggesting to you, and that is, in wise you find Lee coming to the north of the Rappahannock, I would by no means cross to the south of it. If he should have a rear force at Fredericksburg tempting you to fall upon it, it would fight in intrenclimeuts, and have you at disadvantage, and so, man for man, worst you at that point, while his main force would, in some way, be getting an advantage of you northward. In one word, I would not take any risk of being entangled upon...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 15 October 1881

THE NATIONAIi TBIBinSTE: WASHECTGTON', D. C, OCTOBER 15, 1881. 6 THE FUTURE. What may we take into the vast forever? That, marble door Admits no fruit of all our long1 endeavor. No fame-wreathed crown we wore, No garnered lore. What can we wear beyond tlie unknown portal? No gold, no gains Of nil our toiling; in the life immortal No hoarded wealth remains, No guilt, no stains. Naked from out that far abyss behind us We entered here ; No word came with our coming to remind us What wondrous world was near, No hope, no fear. Into the silent, starless night before us, Naked we glide; No hand has mapped the constellation o'er us, No comrade at our tide, No chart, no guide. Yet fearless toward that midnight, black and hollow, Our foot-teps fare ; The beckoning of a Father's hand we follow His love alone is there, No curse, no care. THE BOY WHO COULD NOT BE HURT, David Ker, in Harper's Young People. I. Many, many years ago, about the time that Hendrick Hudson was smoking his first pipe wit...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 15 October 1881

THE NATIONAL TKIBinSTE: WASHINGTON", D. C, OCTOBEE 15, 1881, 7 EIGHT HOURS.. J1Y .T. O. BL.ANCH.1K1. We mean to make thingso7cr; we are tired of loil for naught; With bare enough to live upon, and never an hour of thought. Wc want to feci the sunshine, we want to smell the flowers ; We know that God has will'd it, and we mean to have eight hours. We're fcummoning our forces from the coal mine, shop and mill Eight hours for work, eight hours for rest, eight, hours for what we will. The beasts that graze the hillside, and the birds that wander free, In the life that God has meted liavc a better lot than we; Oh! hands and hearts are weary, and homes are sad with dole, If our lives are filled with drudgery, what need of a human soul ? Shout, shout the lusty rally, from eoal mine, shop and mill Eight hours for work, eight hours for rest, eight hours for what we will. The voice of God within ut is calling us to stand Erect, as is becoming to the work of His right hand; Should he to whom t...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 15 October 1881

THE NATIONAL TRIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, OCTOBER 15, 1881, 8 SEASIDE DREAMS. My fair love sits by the sounding sea, The waves toss their foam to her feet, And I wonder docs she think of me, My love so utterly bweet? Robed in iUhthetic garb is .she, The colors arc yellow and green, In her hand a sunflower nods to me As large as ever was seen. The winds blow wild, her hair so brown Is tossed in a shining maze, Across her breast the locks are thrown In the sunset's ruddy blaze. Her eyes are not fixed on a distant sail, And her thoughts nre not on the sea, She hears not the wind or the curlew's wail, Has never a thought for me. She dreams of loves won long before She sat by the sounding sea, The hearts she has Avon, the scalps in store Some thirty and two or three And the waves roll in and wet her feet, And the crab they nibble her toes, . But to recall her conquests is so sweet She does not know it blows. I try in vain for a word or a smile Prom my love by the sounding sea ; I'll twine ...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 22 October 1881

'TO CARE FOR HIM WHO HAS BORNE THE BATTLE, AND FOR HIS WIDOW AND ORPHANS." ESTABLISHED 1877. WASHINGTON, D. C, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1881. NEW SERIES. V-1., N. 10. THE GATLING GUN. AT GARNETT'S, JUNE 27th AND 28th, 1862. StuWwrn FigLtlnar and a Rebel Repine Who Had Charge of the Gatlincs A Detachment of. the 49th Pa. Claims the Honor. Correspondence of The National Tribunk. Philadelphia, Pa.. October 17, 1881. In The National Tribune of September 10 "several old soldiers" ask when and where "Gat ling " guns were first used in the Army of the Potomac, and an invitation is given for any one having knowledge of the facts to furnish a sketch of the battle in which they were used. Now, I am glad that such a request has been made, because the battles in which I know they were used have been generally ignored, or at best lightly treated by the historians of the rebellion. I speak of the engagements of the 27th and 28th of June, 1802, on the rigid or south bank of the Chiekahominy. I will a...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 22 October 1881

2 THE NATIONAL TBIBTTNE: WASHINGTON, D. O., OCTOBER 22, 1881. ONE DAY. Good by, dear day, good by, And let me wreathe with immortelles The moments dear that fly On golden wings of love ; and mark with white The hours wherein no cloud of pain Hath dimmed thy beauteous light. Farewell, sweet day, farewell, E'en now the gentle curfew peals From memory's tolling bell. I count the echoes as they fall, And grieve and sigh, yet smile, that they Are ever past recall. Good by, dear day, good by, L,ike some fond heart we've loved and lost That in death's gr:isp doth lie, With tender flowers upon the brow, Each tender bloom a precious hour, Thou seem'st unto me now. Farewell, dear day, farewell, Go thou where those sleep that are gone! For after all 'tis well. I would not call back one dead face, I would not live thine hours again, Nor e'en thy joys retrace. Lydia F. ITinman THE IRON SHROUD. BY WILLIAM MUDFORD. The night came ; and, as. the hour approached when Vivenzio imagined lie might expe...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 22 October 1881

THE NATIONAL TKIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, OCTOBER 22, 1881, 3 KEENAN'S CHARGE. BY GEOUGE PAR.-OK3 liATHttOP. The sun had set ; The leaves with dew were wet: Down fell a bloody dusk On the woods, that second of May, Where Stonewall's corps, like a beast of prey, Tore through, with angry tusk. ""They've trapped us, boys ! " Kose from our flank a voice. With a rush of steel and smoke On came the Rebels straight. Eager as love and wild as hate : And our line reeled and broke : Broke and fled. No one stayed but the dead ! With curses, shrieks, and cries, Horses and wagons and men Tumbled back through the shuddering glen. And above us the fading skies. There's one hope, still Those batteries parked on the hill ! "Battery, wheel ! " ('mid the roar) "Pass pieces; fix prolongs to fire Retiring. Trot!" In the panic dire A bugle rings " Trot" and no more. The horses plunged, The cannon lurched and lunged, To join the hopeless rout. But suddenly rode a form Calmly in front of the human storm, Wit...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 22 October 1881

THE NATIONAL TRIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, OCTOBER 22, 1881. The National Tribune PUBLISHED EVERY SATURPAY. TO CARE FOR HIM WHO HAS BORNE THE BATTUE, AND FOR HIS HDOW AND ORPHANS. ABRAHAM LmCOLN. Terms to Subscribers, Payable in Advance:' (postage prepaid) ONE COPY, ONE YEAR FIVE COPIES " t - $1.50 6.25 ONE COPY THREE MONTHS ----- 50 ONE COPY SIX MONTHS ----- 75 TEN COPIES, (wjth extra copy to getter-up of clod,) 12.50 A SPECIMEN NUMBER of our paper sent free on request. TERMS FOR ADVERTISING furni6heo upon application. 2-TO SUBSCRIBERS. When changing your ADDRESS PLEASE GIVE FORMER AS WELL AS PRESENT ADDRESS, WITH COUNTY AND STATE. JS3-TAKE NOTICE In sending money for sub scriptions BY MAIL, NEVER INCLOSE THE CURRENCY EXCEPT IN A REGISTERED LETTER. A POSTAL MONEY ORDER OR A DRAFT ON NEW YORK IS THE BEST FORM OF REMITTANCE. LOSSES BY MAIL WILL BE MOST SURELY AVOIDED IF THESE DIRECTIONS ARE FOL LOWED. 3S-NO RESPONSIBILITY IS ASSUMED FOR SUBSCRIP TIONS PAID TO AGENTS, WHICH MUST BE AT TH...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
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