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Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857) Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 3,401 items from Boston Pilot (1838-1857), samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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WASHINGTON. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 14 March 1846

WASHINGTON. Marc# 4, 1346. Extraordinary Case of Religious Perse--culion—The Winnebago culators, fyc. There promises to be enacted, during the present session of Congress, the second edition of the late religious riots in Switzerland, if not exactly in the same manner with the agency of powder and ball, at least with the more powerful implements of rational and constitutional warfare—paper pellets luid tongue fire. On the 19th of last month, while the Indian appropriation bill was under consideration in the House of Representatives, the Hon Hugh White, of the Saratoga district in the State of New York, moved to amend the bill by inserting a clause of providing that the general government, its agents or sub-agents, should not have any power to interfere in the internal affairs of that tribe, so far as the appointing of preachers, mechanics or agriculturists were concerned. The object which Mr. White had principally in view in offering a clause of this kind, was to prevent frauds from...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Domestic. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 14 March 1846

Domestic. As Texas on the 16th ult. became a State of the American Union, letters for Texas may now be transmitted to any part of that State without the pre-payment of postage. An Injunction, says the Post, has been served on the Manufacturers’ and Mechanics’ Bank at Nantucket. It can now do no business. The liabilities exceed the capital to the tune of about $134,000 Dreadful Effects of the Storm. We learn from the Norfolk Courier that a respectable resident of the vicinity of Nott’s Island, Currituck county, N. C., arrived in Norfolk on Saturday morning, who states that the effects of the late storm were most awfully experienced on that part of the coast. He says that fifty families were drowned on Nott’s Island, and 1000 head of cattle destroyed. The wild fowl suffered most severely—wild geese might be taken in almost any quantity—some killed, others so much crippled as to be easily seized, being unable to escape. — Baltimore Clipper, Feb. 9. Ocean Mail to Oregon. The Postmaster ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Correspondence. REPEAL MEETING AT CROTON HALL. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 14 March 1846

Correspondence. REPEAL MEETING AT CROTON HALL. New York, March 9th, 1846. , (Reported for the Pilot.) Messrs. Editors: An adjourned meeting of the New York Repealers took place this evening at Croton Hall, Eugene Casserley, Esq., in the chair. On taking the chair, he addressed the meeting. Although the general aspect of the Repeal movement had till within recently changed but little, now it was passing through a phase of interest. The failure of the people’s fopd had already commenced its desolating work, and in one part of the country, the people had been roused out of their apathy. In Galway, the government was pretending to quiet this apprehension with its usual sedative, steel and lead. It had also been prompt in sending a warsteamer; and if it had taken no measures to prevent this threatened scarcity, it must be admitted it was showing itself anxious to preserve the peace. Now it was monstrous that in a, country proverbially fertile, this periodical famine should be recurring w...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Ireland. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 14 March 1846

Ireland. Henry Crattan, Esq., at the Meeting of the Repeal Association on the 26th January, uttered the following bold and patriotic sentiments : Mr. Grattan, who*on rising was greeted with loud cheers, said that he had just returned from the county of Tipperary if possible a more determined llepealer than ever (cheers). He had gone through the estates of the absentees—estates in most S' aces deserted by the nobility and gentry, e thought as the country was likely to be taxed that they should see what they were to he taxed for, and he took an opportunity of witnessing the condition of that connty. There might be an act passed for coercion, but as far as he was able to judge, the state of things in Tipperary wjis most shamefully exaggerated. He had a paper which stated that six suspicious persons were seen at a certain place at a certain hour. The place was Barrington’s bridge, and he was there, but he saw no suspicious persons. In this way many calumnies were propagated against the ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
IRELAND—HER ABSENTEES. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 14 March 1846

IRELAND—HER ABSENTEES. On Wednesday last the bill for advancing those works, or as much of them as can be carried out by the pitiful grant of 50,000/. was read a second time in the House of Commons, and ordered to be committed on the following day, without a single dissentient voice. We really cannot see why it should be necessarily delayed, even for one’hour. Agreeing entirely with Mr. O’Connell, that in proposing the measure in question, government should be considered as only performing a small part indeed of their duty, still we cannot hesitate to believe that the sooner even that fractional portion of it shall have been discharged the better. The boon, taken in any point of view, is, after all, but a paltry instalment of what is due to our unfortunate country, but in proportion to the smallness of the amount proposed to be granted, should be the rapidity with which it ought to reach its destination. What is to prevent this bill from being passed into a law before the close of a...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
CLEAR THE WAY. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 14 March 1846

CLEAR THE WAY. Men of thought! be up, and stirring Night and day: Sow the seed—withdraw the curtain— Clear the way! Men of action, aid and cheer them, As ye may! There’s a fount about to stream, There’s a light about to beam, There’s a warmth about to glow, There’s a flower about to blow; There’s a midnight blackness changing Into grey; Men of thought and men of action, Clear the way! Once the welcome light has broken, vV ho shall say, What the unimagined glories Of the day? What the evil that shall perish In its ray? Aid the dawning, tongue and pen; Aid it, hopes of honest men, Aid it paper—aid it type — Aid it, for the hour is ripe, And our earnest must not slacken Into play. Men of thought and men of action! Clear the way! Lo! a cloud’s about to vanish From the day; Lo! the right’s about to conquer, Clear the way! And a brazen wrong to crumble Into clay. With that right shall many more F.nter smiling at the door; With the giant wrong shall fall Many others, great and small, That ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 3 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 14 March 1846
Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 3 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 14 March 1846

MARKETS. Retail Prices at Fancuil liall Market, Boston. PROVISIONS. Butter, lump, peril* “ tub Cheese, new, pel* lb “ lour meal Eggs, per doz Beet, iresli, per lb “ salted “ Hots, whole Pork, fresh, “ salted * Hams, Boston, per lb “ Western Card, best, per lb Veal, per lb Calves, wltole I.until, \f |h Mutton Sheep, whole Chickens Turkeys Geese, Mougrt I, a piece VfiGISTABLES. .20® 28 .17® 25 .08® 10 .04 ® Oii .18® 20 ..6®13 ...0 13)1 .ji ® m ..8 ® 10 ....21® 8 ~..«!"® 10 B4 ® 9 Bl ® 9 ....o(3> 12 s® Si 4 ® n ... .4 ® 121 3 ® 3 .. ..10 ® 14 ....10® 14 .0.00 ® 0.00 Potatoes, 4f peek 25 ® 00 Cabbages, ip' <loz 25® 1.25 Squashes, |f )b.• 3 (n> 4 Turnips, bushel 00 ® 50 Onions, ff bunch 31 ® 4 Beets, bushel 00 ® 25 Beans, bushel 1.25® 2.00 Potatoes, If bbl 1.50 ® 1,25 Kttitrr. Cranberries, If bushel 3.00 ® 4.00 Apples, bushel 1.00 ® 1.50 “ dried, If lb -."1 Oranges, 4f box 2.00 ® 2.2.1 I .emeus, u 2.25 ® 2.50 b us, If lb 10® 12 Briohton M tuKKT— Monday. M...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 3 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 14 March 1846

The cheapest cat BSTABLISIi.WENT IN THE IJ. J. SADLIER, Publishers, Bookuinpeks, No. Gold street, fully annouuce to the Clergy and Lait and British Provinces, that they are i liish every description of Catholic Wl favorable than any other establishi Having been many years engaged in t thoiic-works, ancLbeing practical bin selves that our list prices are coi gelling up and style ol binding Uo wh attention) much better than those of ment. Catholics have long felt the heavy I (considering the miserable manner it best works have been got up; by tin chdrged tor Catholic works, thereby i the reach of thousands—it was this th come some of the first pioneers in tl now extending itself over the com cheap system, depending on a large si small profits, in which we have bet and encouraged by the Right Rev. ant Baity, a continuance of which shall ii the publication of some of the most rt prices which will place them within t dels from religious societies, librarie mission, the, furnished on the ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE BLACK JOKE. A TALE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 14 March 1846

THE BLACK JOKE. A TALE. CAROL MALONE. Tom ITiggs was in the Rifles, and Upon the bugle a stout Mower; The best bassoon in all the band. His lungs were of a half horse power. Whenever Tom’s trombone was heard, The Major smiled, his Lady wondered ; As, weekly in the Carrack yard, The Muses agonized and thundered. But man’s ambition’s all a show ; And earthly vanities must end : Tom’s music soon became “ no go In fact, his bellows were to mend. For, at the Colonel’s ball one night, In playing six sets of “ The Lancers,” He burst a blood-vessel, and quite Shocked all the nerves of all the dancers. ’Twas sad ; but then the cause was clear ; His case required no deep solution ; For less than smith’s work couldn’t bear Such boiler bursting execution. Some months thereafter, invalided, Incurable, he walked at largeCertificates were scarcely needed For such a skeleton’s discharge. To Donegal, where “ mountain dew,” And mountain mists and spirits be, Tom, cautioned that his days were few, Wen...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Correspondence. LETTERS FROM PARK-ST. STEEPLE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 14 March 1846

Correspondence. LETTERS FROM PARK-ST. STEEPLE. Dear Mr. Pilot —l am a man from the country, (I mean a man from one of the towns in this state,) and having some leisure, 1 propose writing you a letter now and then as I have opportunity. I have a great many things on my mind to write about, and hardly know which to take up first ; but I will take the “condition of man.” Now I think that his first condition was that in which his maker intended to make j him happy; or to place him in that condi- j tion in which he should receive the utmost hupp mess he was capable of in this world. ' ✓ What that situation was we learn from 1 the records of Holy Scripture—the world was given to him to cultivate and replenish, in the sweat of his face he was to get his living. Now it strikes me that man is born, to live by This being his destination, the government should be such that all w r ho chose this employment should have the opportunity to enjoy it, it being productive of a greater happiness than ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
DETROIT, MICHIGAN. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 14 March 1846

DETROIT, MICHIGAN. February 23d, 1846. The Anniversary of one the most illustrious, and most renowned champions of Columbia’s happy land was celebrated here on the 23d of February, being the day subsequent to the commemoration of the nativity of George Washington, whose worthy reputation will, 1 am sure, be for ever revered, and whose triumphant valor, and patriotic maxims, irretnovably remain as an emblem of perpetual esteem, in the hearts ot all republican people. Early as twilight had signalized the then coming morn, the banners of this flourishing city were seen impendent, in the usual magnificence, their resplendent stripes and unblemished stars, amidst the frigid atmosphere ot an Occident breeze. Immediately, I could discern tiles of the volunteer companies perambulating the grand Broad way ot Detroit, (Jefferson Avenue) and awaiting the trumpet signal of freedom—to call them to the melancholy, but welcomed moment; at about half past eight, the several companies consisting of ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
“IN THE NAME OF THE PROPHET! FIGS.”* [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 14 March 1846

“IN THE NAME OF THE PROPHET! FIGS.”* Mr. Editor: —A writer in recent numbers of the Olive Branch over the signature of “An Adopted Citizen,” much after the manner of the Turkish fruit vender, cries out week after week Hogan’s chaste and classical productions in the name of that harmonious, unique and congenial confederacy called Protestantism. This writer utters four or five palpablefrnisstatements, among a numberless host of minbr ones, which require particular notice; though, considering the character of the conductors of that journal, it is little better than a waste of ink and paper; for we “ Destroy their fill or sophistry in ivwn, Tile knaves are at their dirty work a^ain.” The first part of this precious morceau begins thus: “From the days of the Reformation, Romish hatred of the Scriptures has been unrelenting.” Absurd as this charge is, there are many of the duped followers ot the .sot disant Evangelicals who believe it as firmly as they formerly did the Maria Monk humbug; ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
NAPOLEON’S SENTIMENTS REGARDING PROTESTANTISM. RELIGIOUS CONVERSATIONS AT ST. HELENA, COLLECTED BY GENERAL MONTHOLON. (Translated for the Catholic Advocate). [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 14 March 1846

NAPOLEON’S SENTIMENTS REGARDING PROTESTANTISM. RELIGIOUS CONVERSATIONS AT ST. HELENA, COLLECTED BY GENERAL MONTHOLON. (Translated for the Catholic Advocate). “The emperor had little relish for Protestantism, and voluntarily availed himself of opportunities to criticise it. Here is what he one day said about it at St. Helena. They may, if they choose, call Protestantism the religion of reason, a very suitable appellation for an invention of man. Catholicity, on the contrary, is the religion of faith, because it is the work of Cod. Without doubt we all have a propensity to refer every thing to the yardstick of our own judgment, and to believe only what comes under our own senses. Humanly speaking, 1 should consent to celebrate the Lord’s Supper in commemoration of Jesus Christ, rather than eat really his body and drink his blood, which is difficult to be understood und hard to believe. But am I to be astonished at meeting mysteries in religion, when I see them every where in nature? A...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 14 March 1846
Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 14 March 1846

Notice.s of this kind inserted four times for $l. INFORMATION WANTED, Of PATRICK, BERNARD, MARY, CATHERINE, Rail ELIZABETH COURTNEY, natives of parish olLag;m, co. Longford. Tliey are supposed to be in l’biladelphiu. Tlieir brother, Michael, is ia this city, aid is anxious to hear from them. Address him, care of Thomus Mulligan, 20 Tyler Court, Boston, Ms. Mh 14 H 4t Of JOHN SWEENY, a native of Edgeworlhtown Parish, co. Longford, who landed in New York about thirteen years since, and when lust heard from was about going from Alleghany County, Md, to James River, Virginia. Any information of the above will be gratefully received by Patrick Sweeny, Baltimore, Md, care ol Patrick Brady, No. 1 Camden street. Mhl4 H 4t Of BETSY DEALEY, native of Thurles, co. Tipperary, who emigrated to America about S years ago. YVhen lust heard from she was at Charleston, S.C. Any information of her will be thankfully received by her brother, John Dealey, Cove street, Boston care ol Mr. Now lan. Mch. 14...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Irish parliament. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 14 March 1846

Irish parliament. The following speech was delivered by William Smith O’Bien, Esq., at a meeting of the Repeal Association on the 2nd of February:— He said—and now, Mr. Chairman, and gentlemen, I have to bring up a report from the committee of the National Association on the bill which is now in progress in the Blouse of Commons relating to the extension of public works in Ireland ; but before I do so, I may perhaps be allowed to make a few observations with reference to the events of last week, —I may say of the last fortnight. Assuredly 1 could scarcely refer to any portion of English history which has been fraught with more eventful circumstances than the last fortnight (hear, hear). We have seen a minister who, for thirty-five years of his life, was the determined enemy of the principle of free trade, come forward and declare that he has qt length yielded to the force of reason and of truth, and acknowledge that he is u convert to that principle which he has spent all his time i...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
ON THE CATHOLIC USE OF BEADS. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 14 March 1846

ON THE CATHOLIC USE OF BEADS. Perhaps there is no practice of Catholic devotion, which our separated brethren regard as more superstitious,than the prayers of the beads; but this opinion, like all those which are honestly entertained against our worship, is founded in a total misconception of the case. We have never yet seen the Protestant, who had the faintest idea of what we mean by the use of beads; it is sufficient that the use is Catholic , for them to condemn it. But we are satisfied, that this practice, like every thing else relating to the true worship, if correctly understood, would not only cease to excite any aversion in their minds, but would be acknowledged as one of the sweetest and most reasonable acts of devotion that a Christian can perform. It is to us a subject of sincere and moving grief, that there are so many excellent spirits, amongst our Protestant brethren, held in total ignorance of the whole Catholic creed), discipline, and practice. AVe have every reason ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
MASSACHUSETTS AND INDIANA. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 14 March 1846

MASSACHUSETTS AND INDIANA. Our readers will long remember the debate on tfie Massachusetts resolutions in the House of Representatives. From the following joint resolutions, introduced into the House of Representatives of Indiana on the 15th Feb., by Mr. Hazlerigg, and by consent passed both houses of the Legislature, our readers will perceive that Indiana is not so hostile to the emigrant as old Massachusetts:— Whereas, The subject of amending the naturalization laws of the United States is now agitated in Congress, and propositions are pending to extend the period of probation to twenty-one years, under pretext of securing the purity of the ballot-box; and whereas, a law extending the period to fourteen years was passed at a period of high political excitement during the Administration of the elder Adams, and immediately repealed, through the force of public opinion, at the commencement of the next Administration, as inexpedient, impolitic and illiberal; andVhereas, it is the poli...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
MASSACHUSETTS LEGISLATURE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 14 March 1846

MASSACHUSETTS LEGISLATURE. THE PILOT, SAtCRDIf, MARCH 14, tB4«. We find, on looking over the Boston papers, that we made a slight mistake in our last, respecting the measures before the Legislature, affecting emigrants and foreign citizens. Our mistake regarded the stage ih which those measures were : we were informed that bills had been moved and committed; it appears that only the Judiciary Committee had been directed to enquire for the purpose of preparing the bills. We are also assured, on behalf of the Legislature, that there is very little probability of bills being brought in on either subjects, or of them passing the House, if they be. We hope so ; and with this hope we are very happy to correct our mistake. It is no pleasure to us to write strictures on the conduct of the Legislative body : we desire the honor of Massachusetts as sincerely as any member of that body ; and for that very reason we have written as we did. And we are glad to find that our writing has produced s...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
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