ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Seymour Express And Goulburn Valle... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 10,508 items from Seymour Express And Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook And Yea Advertiser, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
10,508 results
MAKING A STACK COVER. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 30 January 1914

MAKING A STACK COVER. -In requesting information upon "the best mixture to put on a hessian stack cover to make it waterproof and not to rot it," a correspondent explains that he has tried Stockholm tar and mut ton fat, but that mixture makes the cover too heavy, and the tar is liable to burn the fibre of the cover.. This rspoundent is informed that a sat isfactory waterproof cover cannot be nmado from hessian, and in the long run it is cheaper to get a canvas cover, and 'vre it passed through a solution to .rake it rotproof. With care such a co "r lasts for years. A process or wan-uroofing worth a trial is as fol lows: -Ingredients: 2 oz. soap, 4 oz. glue, I gal. water. Soften the glue in cold water, and dissolve it together with the wsap in the water by aid o1 heat and ag,1stion. The cloth is filled with this soluion by boiling it in the lquid for several hours, the time ee quired depending ,uon the kind of fibre and thickness of 'a Lh. When pro perly saturated the. croess of liqu...

NEW PROCESS FOR PRESERVING MILK. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 30 January 1914

NEW PROCESS F IZ? RESEILVLNU To the already kudwn methods oi" preserviug milk another has been add ed by two Italian physioians. Their method is to preserve milk by means of an atmosphere of carbonic acid gas, under pressure. Tie milk remains unaltered for sevcral days, both in' its physical and chemical cnaracters, and in the -biological constituents, the fer ments. Some of the germs present are killed, while others have their do rvc:o;unt arrested. By this method uncooked milk can be kept for eight or twelve days at a temperature - of 12 d?eg. to 14 deg. C., while boiled millk is preserved indefinitely. The gas is produced with little or no trouble. The inventors claim for th:s method a solntion of the question ot infant feeding. Milk preserved in this manner ought certainly to be su perior to milk sterilised by heat, ow .:g to the fact that milk can be kept by this process for a considerable pe .-i with all pathogenic-germs absent, ,\lile its biochemical functions remain intact, ...

INTRINSIC VALUE OF MANURE ON THE FARM. THE USES IT SERVES MAKE IT OF VAST ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 30 January 1914

INTRINSIC VALUE OF MANURE ON THE FARM. THE USES IT' SERVES MAKE IT OF VAST ECONOMIC IMPORT ANCE. It is imposible to accurately estimate the full money value of farm manure. Its value as a fertiliser; that is, the money valuoe of the plant food that it adds to the soil, may easily be computed from a ohemical analysis. But through out the country as a general rule, its value as a fertiliser requires much less consideration that its other values. Its effect upon the soil far transcends in value the value of the plant food it adds to the soil. These other uses of farm manure are of prime importance to the producing copacity of most soils they have not been given. enough con sideration, and as a result, the pro ducing capacity of these soils has not been ninad what- it might easily have been made. Nearly all soils are seriously lacking in vegetable content. Vegetable growth uses up the vegetable content of the soil. After land has been suc cessfully cropped for a. number of years the dec...

MELBOURNE LETTER [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 30 January 1914

MELBOURNEF. LETTER (From our:Spooial Correspondent). This summer has brought more than the uual number. of big fires in the city and suburbs. .Tne losses repro sented by the disasters that have oc curred during the past oew months make a staggering total. Flourishilng business enterprises have encountered serious set-backs -because insurance is never- anything like -adequato compen sation fbr the dislocation of operations in a live concern, which is aslbad as tile actual loss of goods, plant and buildings that go up in smoke, or remain a dole ful tribute to the devastation of an element against which the most elabor ate precautions yet devised are by no means efficient. That tl.oro has been a vast improvement in the methods of fire fighting, and the equipment and or ganisation of tho metropolitan bri gades cannot be gainsaid. Outbreaks which have- taken place recently and which, although they have caused en ormous damage would, .if opposed only by the forces and appliances at dis po...

ROOM FOR EXPERIENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 30 January 1914

ROOM FOR EXPERIENCE. A young woman who aspired to be a· nurse applied to a doctor for a po sition in his private nursmg home. "Have you had any experienee?" asked the man of medicine. "Experience,-' she cried. "I shonuld think so! Two of my brothers play football, another has tried te oross the channel in an aeroplane of his own make, mother is a suffragette, and father keeps a motor car. " A young man calls a sweetheart of his Revenge, because she is sweet; and another calls his niother-in-law -De lay, because she is dangerous; and a South-end man calls his 'wife Fact, bebause she is a. stubborn thing; and and a wife of a lawyer calls him Neces sity, because he knows no law; a New castle man calls his wife Frailty, be cause Shakespeare says, "Frailty, thy name-.is woman ;" and a Birmingham insurance agent calls his wife Honesty, because it's the best policy; and a Sydney man calls his wife Mary Jane, because that is her name; and a Liv erpool man calls his wife Darling, be cause th...

CHERRY WINE. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 30 January 1914

CHERRY WINE. A recipe for the manufacture <t cherry. wine, recommended by the viit cultural Expert of fNew South Wale, Air AL. llunno, readsl:-?lemovo tole stalks of the cherries, and then uake a pulp of the fruit without breaking the stones, working the pulp so as to tree it entirely from the stones. 'leu puip should then be passed through a sieve. To the pwp of every 2211 eL truit add 51b augar, together with Su cream of tartar and uone gallon t water. Stir the whole and lake a homogenous fluid. Place the vessel in a room where the temperature is tromu 65 to 70 deg. Fahr., and cover banm with a cloth. After about 24 hours, the liquor wilt begin to ferment. When fermentation has subsided (which can be judged by the cessation of bubbling) the liquid should be separated iroum tue pulp, and the former (which in now wine) is stored away in a cask and kept in a oool place. The storage vessel should be kept filled, either sy adding more of the cherry wine or else good sound gr...

ELECTRIC STERILISATION. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 30 January 1914

ELECTRIC- STERILISATION. Tho importance nowadays attached-.. after ago-long neglect--to securing milk in a condition as nearly as pos siblo. free from disease germs of ever, kind gives speoial interest to a mod. of electric sterilisation invented by : Liverpool doctor. Hitherto the ntod, pursued to preserve milk in lull fre?t. ness of condition for the considrablel length of time necessary for its distri bution and consumption has bee.n to heat the liquid to a temperature swhich kills the microbes, and then to prevent the access of further microb?- by se curing it in air-tight bottles, after which the freshness seems to hb pes served indefinitely. An objection to the method is that the heat:ng of th. milk is in effect a cooking pr,.ss, vwhich so far chranges the natureu f thii constituents as to render then less readily nutritious. Dr. J. M. Beat tio, of Liverpool, however, sterilises the milk by electric current, and thus avoids heating it at all.

IN A FRIENDLY SORT OF WAY. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 30 January 1914

IN A FRIENDLY SORT OF WAY. When a man ain't got a cent and it's feeling kind o' blue, Xnd the clouds hang dark and heavy and won't let the sunshine through, It's a great thing, 0 my brethren, for a tellow just to lay His hand upon your. shoulder in a friendly sort o' way. It makes a man feel-curious, it makes the. teardrops start, .An' you sort o' feels a flutter in the region of the heart; You can't look up and meet his eyes, you don't know what to say, When his hand is on your shoulder in a friendly sort o' way. Oh, the world's a curious compound with its 'honey and its gall, With its cares and bitter crosses, but a good world after all; An' a. good.. God must have made leastways that is what I say, When a hand is on your shoulder in a friendly sort of way.

POTTING BUTTER. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 30 January 1914

POTTING BUTTER. A practical correspondent, in reply to an enquiry, thus describes the methods he has found successful:-"A vessel intended for keeping butter should be deep, with.a mouth not exceedingly 10 inohes in width. Butter made for keeping should be churned from ripen ed cream. The temperature on the day of churning should be as low as possible,. and if water can be obtained at 50 deg. for washing, so much the better. After at least three wash ings, during which the butter is rooked gently to prevent its aggregation, it should be brined and -subsequently placed in a trough to drain and dry. If a butter box is provided for cooling, so much the better, inasmuch as for keeping the butter should be quite firm before salting and working on the but ter workeT. The salt should be ground almost as fine as flour, having first been thoroughly dried. It is then distributed on the butter, after the roller has been passed over it, at the rate of three-quarters of an ounce to the pound. Som...

A SWAMP SOIL. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 30 January 1914

A SWAMP SOIL.. Some owners of swamp soil are puzz led by their unproductive charactr when first cultivated. They reason that soils have been made out of vegetation and, therefore, should be able- to produce plants luxuriantly. The truth generally is that a raw swamp soil is in an inert condition. The air has been excluded, and acids have formed, and bacteria are not-at work. When the water has been drawn off, the exposure of the soil to frost after autumn ploughing and a summer of thorough tillage does much to mend matters. A few tons of stable manure per acre introduce the needed bacteria.. An application of lime sweetens the soil. The nitro gen in the swamp begins to gain av ailability. 'Usually, there is great deficiency in potash, and- heavy ap plications pay. Phosphoric acid also is needed. The first year should be given to some bustling plant like maize that can help itself -to raw and coarse food, ind the tillage paves the way for a more profitable trucking crop the next seas...

MARKETS. WHEAT AND OTHER PRODUCE. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 30 January 1914

IARKETS. WHEAT AND OTHER PRODUCE. Wheat.-The market has been steady at 3/54 to 316, and a fair business has been done at 3/6 for parcels. Flour.-A small business has been done for -export. The association price for new flour is £8/10/ delivered. Bran and Pollard-The association price for bran is £ 1/10/ delivered, and that for pollard £-l/15/. Barley.--Really prime Chevoralier mal ting is quoted at 3/6, while a parcel a little below this class has realised 3/4. Prime Duckbill is quoted at 3/3 to 3/4. Cape nmilting is quoted at 2/2 to 2/21, with business at the former figure, while medium Cape ranges from 2/ up wards. Oats.-Prime Algerian milling are quoted at 1/94 cx store for rail. A fair parcel of heavy feed has been sold or shipment to New South Wales at 1/9i f.o.b. The spot quotation for feed ranges from 1/71 to 1/SI ex store or rail according to quality. Maize.-Good to prime flat red is quoted at 4/ to -1/1 ex store. Peas.--Duns are nominally quoted at up to-I/9. Chaff.---Choic...

TRULY RURAL. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 30 January 1914

TRULY RURAL. Teacher (to soholars)-"Why does scandal circulate so quickly in this village?" Sharp Scholar-"Because potatoes have eyes, wheat has ears, and beans talk."

JUST ONE. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 30 January 1914

JUST ONE. SYou have a fair memory, a great capacity for learning, a large bump o'h veneration1 and a well-developed head generally,' said the phrenologist. "And is there anything else?" asked the youth under examination in the exuberanoe of his joy, "that my head needs to make it absolutely perfect?" "Yes," answered the professor, "it - -er-needs a shampoo." In the final for the President's Cun. at the Southminster (Eng.)- coursing meeting, Waif defeated Mr. Oscar. Asche's Advance Australia (late Ena's Delight); The directors of the Austral Hat Mills Limited have declared an interim dividend at the rate of 8 per cent. per annum on the capital of the company for the half-year ending December 31, 1913, payable on February 14. 'l he demand which the Customs d partmiht has made on Victoria for the payment of between £4000 and £5000, as duty upon a dredge which the State iT borrowing from New Zea land in order to assist in expediting the harbour works which are now in progress, is stated...

SPECTRES THAT STOLE MONEY. SAVINGS CARRIED OFF. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 30 January 1914

SPECTRES THAT STOI,E MONEY. SAVINGS dARRIEI) OFF. The way in which a French.family or farmers called on "spirits" to aid them in an attempt to avoid paying the rent is causing some amusement in Paris. Two brothers, .named Guitton, occu pied, with their wives and children, a small farm near Saint-Amand. One day they told their neighbors of in visible hands, which upset their flower pots and disarranged their gardens. Mme. Guitton, the younger, said, too, that by night she had seen through her window- two black men--or demons- who walked up and down, ousting cur ses at the house. It was discovered on the next day that the family's whole savings had disappeared. Appeal was made to the priest and to the police. But neither the Latin of the one nor the vigilance of the other (says the "Matin") could throw light upon the matter for the moment. Enquiries were continued by the police and the "stolen" money was found under a staircase, where tle, brothers Guitto h.ad hidden it.

ADVANTAGES OF CLIPPING HORSES. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 30 January 1914

ADVANTAGES OF CLIPPING HORSES. First.--The natural process of moul ting or shedding the hair is a draft on the vitality of the animals. The ap petite is dlminished, and with work or pleasure, horse exertion is irksome dur ing that per.od. Clipping or arti licial removal of the lair accomplishes in a very short space of time what Nature requires much moro time to do. In other words, Nature is an ticipated in her work, and the ani mal's system saved a call upon it. Second.--A olipped horse is less liable to take cold than a long-coated horse, because the evaporation of pers piration is more rapid. A "hot" torse w.11 cool out much quicker with a short coat. Every groom is aware of this fact. Third.-A clipped horse requires less fuel (food) to maintain bodily heat than the long coated horse; therefore clip ping as a matter of economy should be generally practised. Fourth.---- lcpped horse ldoks noro cleanly, acts more sprightly, and keeps in better health. Horses in tended for the sale ...

COOKED OR UNCOOKED FOOD FOR PIGS. WHICH IS BEST? [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 30 January 1914

COOKED OR UNCOOKED FOOD FOR PIGS. WHICH IS BEST? The economic value of cooking food for pigs is frequently discussed, and upon the point divergent views ex pressed. An interesting experiment upon the subject has been conducted by one of the agricultural high schools in Wales, and the results there obtain ed go to indicate that there is a slight profit in favour of cooking food. six pigs were used in the experim ant, be ng of the large Yorkshire and Berk shire cross. They were fifteen weeks old at the beginning. The ration given to lot one was 3} lb boiled potatoes, 21 lb barley meal; and to lot two lhe sameo.quantities, only the potatoes were raw. The potatoes were boiled in' sufficient quantity to last a week, and were supplied cold, whereas the potatoes in toe case of the second m. tion were pulped after being tharough ly washed. The potatoes and meal were mixed with water and then sup plied to the pigs. The total gain :i the case or the lot which had the boil ed potatoes was 1 cw...

Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 30 January 1914

FLY CATECHISM. Where is the fly born?--ln manuu and filth. Where does the fly live? - hr all kinds of-filth and he carries filth on his feet and wings. Where does the fly go when he leaves the manure pile and the spittoon?--he gdes into the kitchen, the dining-room and the store. What does the fly do there? - He walks on the bread, fruit, and veget ables; he wipes his feet on the butter and he bathes in the milk. Does the fly visit patients sick with consumption, typhoid fever, and ohol era infantum? He does, and he may call on.you next, carrying the infection of these diseases. What .diseases does the, fly carry? .'rphoid fever, consumption, diarrhoeal diseases, diphtheria, scarlet fever, and in fact, any communicable disease. .How can the fly be prevented P-By destroying all the filth about your premises; screen the privy vault,-cover the manure bin, burn all waste mat ter, destroy your'garbage, soreen your house. Either man must kill the fly or the fly will kill man. Prevent the ...

WALTZING ROUND. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 30 January 1914

WALTZING ROUND. '"Excuse me," he said to his fair partner, taking a bit of wool from the shoulder of her dress. The wool, however, seemed to be never ,ending, until he had wound a large ball, which he, very embarrassingly hid in his oo0 ket. Fair Partner (to mother next morn ing)-"It's a funny thing.mother, but last night I put a woollen spencer om'r my dreg an4? this morning.it 'ad completely disappeared."

A REVOLUTION IN DAIRYING. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 30 January 1914

A REVOLUTION IN DAIRYING. An invention has just been perfect ed -by a young Danish engineer that bids fair to make a revolution in the dairying industry. The invention con sists of a milking machine with sev e-al improvements that place it ahead of all other makes of milking machines at present on the market. The ma chine has c.mbined with it a tiny sepa rator in such a way that the milk is separated as it is drawn from the cow so that what really takes place is teat the milk is delivered direct from the cow as cream anid skim milk separate ly. The system is a very simple onel and hasbeen patented in all countries. The inventor will leave shortly fcr the United States, where he will make final arrangements for the manufac turing and placing on the market of the invention, a work- which he has been unable to accomplish in Den mark, owing to milking machines not finding much favor in that country. The advent of the new machine will completely, revolutionise the present system -.of dai...

NOT IMPOSSIBLE. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 30 January 1914

NOT IMPOSSIBLE. "I saw a queer thing the other day," said a story-teller; "it was a duck swimming across a pond and a cat sitting on its tail." "Oh, nonsense," cried the audience incredulously. "How could a duck swim across a pond wth a, cat on its tail?" -"Nevertheless," said the- story tellei, "it's perfectly. true. I shoold explain, however, that the cat was sit ting on its tail on rawaf"

x
Loading...
x
x