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Title: Tungamah And Lake Rowan Express An... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 21,876 items from Tungamah And Lake Rowan Express And St. James Gazette, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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WELL AND STRONG. [Newspaper Article] — Tungamah and Lake Rowan Express and St. James Gazette — 12 February 1914

WELL AND STRONG. What a grand tiling it is tor woman to fuel well and strong? The Ladies' College of HonUh I113 brought forward a home treatment that has restored thousand! to health ut a trifling cost. Those inter ested eau find out all about it if 'hay send Uvo penny stunps to Dept. 44 Ladies' College of Health, 4lj Elizaboth St* Molbournu. "BLACK" BABBITS.-Mr E. Finn, saoretary of the Dubbo Rabbit Trap pers' Association, states that a, move ment' has been Btartotl to have all rabbit carcases that are paid for at less thin union rates declared "bUck," Tim Cold Storage Union and Biilway Employee:)' Union will be asked to refuse to haudlo theso carcases, SOROSES II AIR TONIC. This preparation ia unsurpassed as a hair food and dandruff preventative. A littld sprinkled on the head night and morning, and guntly massaged into the sealp, renders baldness impossible. Soroses Hair Tonic will absolutely grow hair, and prevent it from falling out-. It imparts & beautiful glossy sheen...

Publication Title: Tungamah And Lake Rowan Express And St. James Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TO THE EDITOR OF THE EXPRESS. [Newspaper Article] — Tungamah and Lake Rowan Express and St. James Gazette — 12 February 1914

TO THE EDITOR OP TIIE EXPRESS. SIR,-I de3ire to ventilate ray grievances in your columns re the suppiy of water I am allowed during the summer months for my market garden at Katuvjafcite. As a Celestial who cultivates all kinds of fruib and vegetables foe the residents, I cannot uefc Rtiy water for the irrigab ion of my land in the summor mouths, although ray neighbor, who does mt pay such heavy rat's, appears to get a full supply. He can get water, and lock it up. whi's'. my fruit and vegotahle?, as tho engineer knows, are withering for the sike of that necessary fluid which I went to great expense, in the purchaee of a pumping plant, to obtain, ' Put this in your paper and oblige. tour?, QCC.J CHARLEY AU TAM. KatnmatifcD, 0/2/1-1.

Publication Title: Tungamah And Lake Rowan Express And St. James Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MR LABKIN JEERS STRIKERS READY TO STARVE [Newspaper Article] — Tungamah and Lake Rowan Express and St. James Gazette — 12 February 1914

MR LABKIN JEERS STRIKERS READY TO STARVE Mr Larkin, in a -speech at Cardiff yesterday (says "The Daily Express' on December 24), scoffed at Lord Aber deen. whom he described as the "head of the Dulbin Castle clique," He said: -Wo have at the head of the Castle clique the Earl of Aberdeen, and his good lady, who get £25,000 a year, and who have no children to keep, ao l'ar 1 know. Their only function, so far as I can gather, is calling meetings and having exhibitions. At the exhibitions they have lecturers, who are paid five and ten guineas, to show how to feed a family of seven on eight and a tanner a week. We have 404 employers in the city who have signed an agreement to lock out and starve any ;wlio wish to belong to, or who associate with, the Irish Transport Workers' Union. The gravest Tight of the twentieth century is now being carried on In Dublin, and I appeal to working men and women in this country to give their assistance. The men of Dublin are in the trenches. If they do ...

Publication Title: Tungamah And Lake Rowan Express And St. James Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CRIME IN BURMA THREE CAUSES STATED. [Newspaper Article] — Tungamah and Lake Rowan Express and St. James Gazette — 12 February 1914

CRIME IN BURMA THR13E, CAUSES STATED. Gloomy reports of crime continue to come from India (says the "Westmin ster Gazette" of November 2S). The judges of tlic Chief Court of Lower Burma, in a review of tlie past year's criminal justice, say they regret that the prevalence of crime in the Lower Province is an "even more seri ous feature of the administration than it was in l'Jll," and cannot regard with equanimity the continuous increase in tlie number of reported cases of of fences. They feel, however, that none of the remedies which have been suggested wholly reach to the root of the disease. The causes of crime are mainly three poverty, disease, and low vitality, and defective moral education. In last year's report the judges indi cated their opinion that the moral senso of the people was diminishing with the slackening of religious ties and obser vances, that with the decay of ancient beliefs the Buddhist religion is losing its moral sanction as an inspiring force in the lives of...

Publication Title: Tungamah And Lake Rowan Express And St. James Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FOOD IN COFFIN CUSTOMS AT GIPSY BURIAL. [Newspaper Article] — Tungamah and Lake Rowan Express and St. James Gazette — 12 February 1914

FOOD IN COFFIN CUSTOMS AT GIPSY BURIAL. Patlietic scenes marked the funeral at llfonl yesterday of Mark Cedre, tile child ot one of the Russian gipsies who recently settled there (says the "Daily Express" of November 18). The mother became frantic when she saw the body in the mortuary, and had to be removed by force. All the way across the cemetery to the grave she cried continuously. "My son, my son." At the graveside she struggled so fiercely with the friends who were holding her that she nearly slipped into tho grave. Curious customs were observed at tho burial. The child was dressed in his best clothes, with a new red hat and shoes of tho same color to match, the latter being beautifully embroidered and or namented with brightly-colored beads. Each mourner placed silver and cop per coins in the coffin, and the father put some bread and meat with the money. 5'he father ceremoniously poured some claret over the coffin before it was lowered into the grave. Afterwards some more of t...

Publication Title: Tungamah And Lake Rowan Express And St. James Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WOMEN AND CHILD WORKERS FACTS REVEALED BY CENSUS. [Newspaper Article] — Tungamah and Lake Rowan Express and St. James Gazette — 12 February 1914

i WOMEN AND CHILD WORKERS FACTS REVEALED 13Y CENSUS. An extraordinary Blue Book in con nection with the Census .of 1911 was issued yesterday (says "Tho Daily News of December 18). It runs to nearly S00 pages, and gives but one table, and that in condensed form! This is tho table of occupations, and study of the huge volume of figures is really fascinating. Thus, to summarise, there are in England and Wales 11,453,665 males and 4,830,734 females engaged in occupations. Of tho women 3,739,532 are unmarried, 680,191 are wives, and 411,011 are widowed. Tho very young and the aged in occupations number: Ages. Males. Females. 10 o 13 21.5S0 10,2'3 13 75,561 39,03! 14 222,851 133,217 G5 and more '435,318 122,332 The largest numbers, of course, are employed at 25-35, tho figures being 2,792,750 men and 1,057,275 women. Then, owing, no doubt, to marriage, there is a great decline in the number of .women workers. At 34-45 they total only 604,769, compared with 2,296,211 men. WHERE WOMEN PREDO...

Publication Title: Tungamah And Lake Rowan Express And St. James Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
COMMONWEALTH TRADE NOT LANGUISHING. BUT MIGHT BE LARGER. [Newspaper Article] — Tungamah and Lake Rowan Express and St. James Gazette — 12 February 1914

COMMONWEALTH TRADE | NOT LANGUISHING. BUT MIGHT BE LARGER. The growth of Australia's trade with the world at large and the United Kingdom in particular has undoubtedly 'been promoted by the Australasian Chamber of Commerce in London which, as it happens, held its twelfth annual general meeting yesterday (says "The Financial News" December IS). The president of this body is no other than the present High Commis sioner for the Commonwealth (Sir George Reid^. while the chairman is Sir John Cockburn, who is as much at home in the Motherland as in Australia herself. The report then presented has raised some points of great interest both to Australia's primary producers' and to consumers in this country. It is need less to insist on the importance, from an Imperial point of view, of the trade in Australasian frozen meat. With an ever-growing industrial population and a home meat supply incapable of in definite expansion, it is of the utmost moment to the workers of this country that the g...

Publication Title: Tungamah And Lake Rowan Express And St. James Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ACCOMPLISHED COCKATOO [Newspaper Article] — Tungamah and Lake Rowan Express and St. James Gazette — 12 February 1914

ACCOMl'I/ISIIEI) COCKATOO Miss Nesta Lapham, 11, writes to the "Express" from Thorngrove Lodge, Gillingham, Dorset-"We own a vory clover cockatoo called Jacko. Besides chopping wood, drawing nails, nipping wire, etc., lie will sing a song witli my father, after which he laughs, like a human being. He will make a stump speech, dance to any tune played or whistled, and 're verses* on being told. Perhaps he thinks It's the tango. Ho can cough very well, and coughs a great deal, and is great chums with our cat, who sits in his cage. "The Germans don't know every thing: they don't know how to trans late English and Scotch words," said Sir Frederick Bridge last night In an address at the London Institution on "The Beggar's Opera" (says the "Dally Mail" of November 27). The song for "Polly" was set to a delightful old Scotch tune, "Gin (if) thou were mine awn thing," and the translator not knowing the meaning of "gin" looked up the word In the dictionary and translated It "schnapps!" (Laug...

Publication Title: Tungamah And Lake Rowan Express And St. James Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LIVINGS FOR THEIR SPOUSES [Newspaper Article] — Tungamah and Lake Rowan Express and St. James Gazette — 12 February 1914

TJIVINGS FOR THEIR SPOUSES The part played by the wives of the clergy In the benefices truffle is very remarkable-no class, indeed, figures more conspicuously (says "The Scot tish Chronicle.") To say that some of these ladies are the active partners of their husbands is rather to under state the case. They buy beneliecs, present their spouses thereto, and then, after the necessary 12 months have elapsed, dispose of the advowsons for welcome cash with an easy grace which is all their own.

Publication Title: Tungamah And Lake Rowan Express And St. James Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LIFE IN WORKHOUSE MIX AND MUDDLE. [Newspaper Article] — Tungamah and Lake Rowan Express and St. James Gazette — 12 February 1914

LIFE IN WORKHOUSE MIX AND MUDDLE. (By Chris Massie in "The Daily Mail.") By using existing institutions ?and by applying to them something like com mon sense liis Department lias been able in the last lew years to put an end to what were known as the horrors of the mixed workhouse. The goats had been separated from sheep, and there had been segregations o£ classes and classification of individuals. Thus Mr John Burns in the debate on Mr Carr-Gomm's London Poor Law Bill, reported in "The Daily Mail," May 26, 1911. Very nice indeed, but it Is not true. Mr Burns' Department has done no thing of the kind, nor will it ever do anything of the kind. I know that in some other work houses, not in this one, timid attempts liavo been made to segregate classes and classify individuals, but no very successful result has been achieved. The goat outside the workhouse is often a sheep and even a lamb inside the workhouse, and vice versa, according to the effect it has upon him. In any case, it is t...

Publication Title: Tungamah And Lake Rowan Express And St. James Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PAYING THE PIPER GERMAN RULERS AND COST OF LIVING. [Newspaper Article] — Tungamah and Lake Rowan Express and St. James Gazette — 12 February 1914

PAYING THE PIPER GERMAN RULERS AND COST OF LIVING. Tlie continual increase of tlie cost o£ living does not only trouble the Ger man working pe'orplu: it is causing no UUle uncisiness among the German rulers (says the Berlin correspondent of 'The Daily Express"). For the last three years most of these princes have been asking for "an in crease o£ pay," the Kaiser himself be ing the first to lodge his complaint with his people, and the few who have not hitherto dared, or thought it advisable, to ask for a higher civil list are now busy preparing public opinion in their realm for the unpleasant and unavoid able necessity of giving more money for the keeping up of the chief of the State. Still. more significant, tlie two or three German Federal princes who have so far had no civil list at all think very seriously of having one established, 0.3 their income, which is either derived from their own (or their wives') for tune, or from the sale of titles, digni ties, and decorations, cannot ...

Publication Title: Tungamah And Lake Rowan Express And St. James Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BRITISH PEARLS [Newspaper Article] — Tungamah and Lake Rowan Express and St. James Gazette — 12 February 1914

I51UTISU 1'EAItLS In early times Britain played its part In the production of pearls, and Taci tus refers to British pearls, but calls them dull-colored and dirty brown. Origen, on the contrary, declared tliat the pearl.; that came from Britain held tho second rank of value. It wis not, however, until about the twelfth cen tury that pearls were used in England, when they became conspicuous in Church ornamentation. Henry VIII. obtained some costly pearls from the monasteries which he plundered.

Publication Title: Tungamah And Lake Rowan Express And St. James Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE NEXT TASK [Newspaper Article] — Tungamah and Lake Rowan Express and St. James Gazette — 12 February 1914

THE NEXT TASK "To explore the most secret depths of the unconscious, to labor in what I have called the subsoil of conscious ness, that will be the principal task of psychology in the century which is opening. 1 do not doubt that won derful discoveries await it there, as important perhaps as have been in the preceding centuries the discoveries of the physical and natural sciences. That at least is the promise which I make for it," says Professor Bergson in the "Independent."

Publication Title: Tungamah And Lake Rowan Express And St. James Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HISTORICAL COSTUMES INDEX AS TO MEN'S SIZE. [Newspaper Article] — Tungamah and Lake Rowan Express and St. James Gazette — 12 February 1914

HISTORICAL COSTUMES INDEX AS TO MEN'S SIZR Referring to your recent articles up on historical costumes, I should like to be allowed to correct what I be lieve to be a popular fallacy, often ex pressed by visitors to museums (writes Mr R. Burbridge to the "Daily News" of November 27). Judging by the sizes of the complete costumes which are now available, they hold thaL men and women ot the periods represented were of less average height than men and women of to-day. I sub mit there is insuiricient foundation for this assumption, however flattering it may be to the present generation. The beauty and luxury of the speci mens available may be accepted as proof positive that there was no lack of means, and I cannot imagine that well fed men of Wiltshire or the West Coun try were not formerly as big as they are to-day. I suggest that the costumes of per sons of large stature, besides being sub jected to harder wear during original ownership, were passed on to others ot humbler rank, or, f...

Publication Title: Tungamah And Lake Rowan Express And St. James Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
REFORM MOVEMENT RUSSIA'S POLITICAL NURSERY [Newspaper Article] — Tungamah and Lake Rowan Express and St. James Gazette — 12 February 1914

REFORM MOVEMENT RUSSIA'S POLITICAL NURSERY Russia will liave enjoyed for a period of 50 years (on January 1, 1914) the ad vantage of local self-government" (says "The Times," for then the Zemstvos will have been in existence for 50 years. . Whatever progress the rural classes in Russia have made since 1S64 must bo attributed largely to its influence, writes Sir D. Mackenzie Wallace, in "The Times." Besides this, it served as an excellent preparatory school for the Duma, which was to realise some of its ambitions and political aspirations. Remembering all this, we regard it as only right and fitting that patriotic (Russians should celebrate joyfully its 50th birthday, and that the proposers of toasts at the coming banquets should heartily wish it long life, health, and prosperity in its future career of usefulness. HOPE FOR THE DUMA Sir Donald Mackenzie's account in "The Times," of December IS, deserves particular notice, as it will enable tho English student of Russian affairs to un...

Publication Title: Tungamah And Lake Rowan Express And St. James Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
RADIUM AS INVESTMENT [Newspaper Article] — Tungamah and Lake Rowan Express and St. James Gazette — 12 February 1914

RADIUM AS INVESTMENT There is 110 move permanent way in which it oney can be invested than in the purchase of radium, it was stated at a meeting of the governors or the Middlesex Hospital. Sir Alfred Pearcc Gould, president of the clinical section of the Royal College of Medicine, said that the pur chase of radium was not an expendi ture of money, but an investment of money. Radium did not get poorer by giving: off its emanation. There was no more permanent way in which money could bo invested than in the purchase of radium. As far as the mind of man could carry itself radium purchased now would be valuable to the end of all time. There was no form of Investment, no fund they could put money into, which was so certain to be actually in the possession of the governors of that hospital hundreds of years hence as l>y the puichase of radium. Prince Alexander of Teck spoke of the encouraging results obtained at the hospital from the use of radium in the treatment of cancerous diseases...

Publication Title: Tungamah And Lake Rowan Express And St. James Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BOY EMIGRANTS SIR RIDER HAGGARD'S VIEW [Newspaper Article] — Tungamah and Lake Rowan Express and St. James Gazette — 12 February 1914

BOY EMIGRANTS SIK RIDER HAGGARD'S VIEW A meeting on behalf of Dr. Bar nardo's Homes was" held yesterday afternoon at Sunderland House, by permission of the Duchess of Marl borough (reports the "Morning Post" of December 1). The Marchioncss of Blandford received the guests. Lady Cowdray presided, and said I that in the Barnardo Homes the chil dren wero taught that the world had need of them. The American Ambas sador (Dr. Page) said that the work of Dr. Barnardo had shed its light all over the world, becausc of the excellent and unerring trueness with which it had been conducted. Tho Duchess of Somerset said that 60,000 children had marched through tho "ever open door," and only one per cent, had been failures. Up to the end of the year the homes had sent 25,000 emigrants to Canada, and all "of them had started with some knowledge of the trade they were to follow. She had just visited the Watts Training Schools in Norfolk, where 300 Barnardo boys were train ing for tho navy or tho mer...

Publication Title: Tungamah And Lake Rowan Express And St. James Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SHAKESPEARE'S CHAMPION FAMOUS CRITIC SPEAKS [Newspaper Article] — Tungamah and Lake Rowan Express and St. James Gazette — 12 February 1914

| SHAKESPEARE'S CHAMPION FAMOUS CRITIC SPEAKS A few Baconian enthusiasts who ven tured into Caxton Hall last night to hear Br. George Brandos, the famous Danish eritic, lecture on Shakespeare, liad a very poor time of it indeed (says the "Daily Express," November 25). They found themselves in an almost wholly pro-Shakespearian audience that listened with rapt attention to a eulogy of their hero, uttered by one of his most ardent worshippers. Sir Francis Bacon could hope for nothing from such a man. Neither could Mr Frank Harris, to whose anti-Shakespearian attacks Dr. Brandes paid some little attention. Yet the sting of his criticism was les sened by the kindliness o£ his appear ance. The pro-Baconians may have ex ' pected a fierce opponent, lashing out invectives against the Pretender. They found a mild little old gentleman, peev ing over a red baize reading desk that appeared to be too high for him, with a wholly benevolent aspect and a hand ful of notes. He has a shock of fretful...

Publication Title: Tungamah And Lake Rowan Express And St. James Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CAUSES OF FATIGUE INTERESTING LIST. [Newspaper Article] — Tungamah and Lake Rowan Express and St. James Gazette — 12 February 1914

CAUSES OF FATIGUE INTERESTING LIST. Professor William Stirling-, of Man chester University, delivering the Lady Priestley Memorial Lecture on "Health, Fatigue, and Repose," said that most of tile breakdowns in a man's life were due to himself, either because of ignorance or recklessness, or both. Overwork, without sufficient repair of an organ, whether brain or eye, digestive organs or muscles, was the primary cause of fatigue. All the or gans of the body could not run at full speed at the same time. Mental fatigue greatly impaired bodily activity, and physical or muscular fatigue had a dis tinct effect on brain activity. The observations of Dr. Leonard Hill on the effects of a liberal supply of oxygen in fatigue were most important. Somnolence in churches and chapels seemed on occasion to occur at sermon time, but it was not in all cases to be attributed to the sermon. The ex planation lay rather in the badly-venti lated atmosphere, and in the fact that Sunday, though the first day...

Publication Title: Tungamah And Lake Rowan Express And St. James Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW TO TELL THE TIME OF NIGHT BY THE STARS. [Newspaper Article] — Tungamah and Lake Rowan Express and St. James Gazette — 12 February 1914

HOW TO TELL THE TifiSE OF . NIGHT BY THE STARS. ,.* JL T. . Nearly every one is fun-.j'-iav with the 'act that the stars rise ju the east.- circle across the sky, cud set to the west, about the same as the sun docs. They are actually mov ing in circles around tlu Pole of the sky as a centre. It is clear from this that if they could be waUhjU ns the hands of a clot'l:,-. we co.'.ld measure time by them. As a mat ter of tact, says Mr. Fore:.t ray fcloultou, in an interesting treatise, our time is actually measured by them. At the big observatories, ob servations of the stars are made every clear night in order ro correct the clocks, which, at the best, are imperfect. This time constitutes what is known as « standard time. Suppose one stands facing the north and regards the North Star, which is almost exactly at the Po'e of the sky, as the ccutre ol the face of a clock. The stars will be observed to go around the Pole from right to left, that is, in the opposite di rection to that in w...

Publication Title: Tungamah And Lake Rowan Express And St. James Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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