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Elephind.com contains 7,005 items from Richmond Guardian, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Ladies' Letter. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 10 February 1917

Ladies' Letter. Hot meals are, served at the Sol diers' Buffet, on St. Kilda-road. You see girls of good family slaving all day, and a woman said to be "worth thousands" sticking to her post with perspiration streaming off her face. A khaki hero visited this establish ment for lunch the other day. He had, been kept waiting ten minutes for his order. The girl responsible said how sorry she was. He looked at her flushed face above her white overall. "I was only kept waiting a few minutes," he replied, "but you you have been waiting all day." Beauteous Olga Petrova, who lures the gloating young damsel and that section of the populace which rolls items of the Non-Purity League like luscious morsels round its tongue, puts up a big effort and nobly resists the million-dollar pearl necklace, in the Soul Market now being screened at Hoyt's. Olga is a beautiful woman, with eyes, and a figure which is as sinuous as a brown snake's, and so perfect that the film people do not have to conceal in...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Where Are My Children? Comes to Richmond.—Film Sensation to be Screened at Crown and Globe Theatres on Monday. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 10 February 1917

Where Are My Children? Comes to Richmond.-Film Sensation to be Screened at Crown and Globe Theatres on Monday. Richmond is to-hJave screenings orf the remarkable picture Where Are 1My Children? It is to be submitted aut the Globe Theatre, Church-street, and the Crown, Victoria-street, on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday next. There will be a special or chestra, and solos will be given by Miss Sherris. Tyrone Power heads a brilliant cast of players in this production. It has scored a success wherever it has been screened, and had a lengthy season at the Auditorium recently. The pic ture, by the beautiful manner in vwhich it is produced and its refine ,meat in dealing with a delicate sub ject, is in a class of its own amongst pictures of this nature. Race suicide is the theme behind the story of Where Are My Children? The drama also argues eugenics. But the tragic note is personal in the drama, the individual sorrow being used to point the general moral. The picture is one that has provo...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Dartnell's V.C. OVERLOOKED AUSTRALIAN. KILLED SEVEN BEFORE DEATH. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 10 February 1917

Dartnell's V.C. OVERLOOKED AUSTRALIAN. KILLED SEVEN BEFORE DEATH. Reference has been made to the posthumous award of the Victoria Cross to Lieutenant W. Dartnell for conspicuous bravery at Maktau, East Africa, where he was killed in action on September 3, 1915. It is not gener ally known that Lieutenant Dartnell, who was an actor by profession, was born in Carlton, Victoria, and leaves a widow and daughter, who reside in Tranmere-avenue, Murrumbeena. Records shows that Dartnell was serving with the British forces in East Africa, being a second lieutenant in the 25th (Service) Battalion of Frontiersmen, of which the noted hunter and explorer, the late Freder ick C. Selous, was a lieutenant. Dart nell was the first man to enter the fort at Port Bukoba, on the western shore of Lake Victoria, Nyanza. He pulled down the German flag with his own hands. On the day of his death Dartnell, having been wounded in the leg, was being carried away, when, realising that other wounded men would hav...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Trouble in the Labor Camp.—Creeping-in of New Element Leads to Internal Strife in Workers' Movement.—Old Leaders Impugned. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 10 February 1917

Trouble in the Labor Camrnp.-Creep ing-in of New Element Leads to Internal Strife in Workers' Move ment.-Old Leaders Impugned. Angry words, allegations and many recriminations over the recent pre selection ballot for the Richmond seat in the State Assembly marked the monthly meeting of the Richmond branch of the P.L.C. on Tuesday night. It was the noisiest and nast lest Labor gathering for many years as far as Richmond is immediately concerned. On the surface it would seem that the overwhelming victory of Mr. Cot ter at the ballot would permit of lit tle argument, but the very fact of him having such a large majority tended, apparently, to further inflame the minds of those most prominently identified in beating up an agitation against him. The meeting plainly indicated that if the' newly-admitted members to the branch had been qualified to vote at the selection, Mr. Cotter would have .had a much harder task to win-if, indeed, he could have won. Mr. J. Sheehan only obtained 44 votes...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Death of Mr. A. H. Massina Removes Another of Richmond's Fine Old Citizens.—He Was Pioneer Printer Always. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 10 February 1917

Death of Mr. A. H. Massina Removes Another of Richmond's Fine Old Citizens.-He Was Pioneer Printer and Publisher, and a Gentleman Always. Peace crowned the end of a per fect life when Mr. A. H. Massina died at his home, Westbank-terrace, last Sunday. He had been ill for some months, and at 82 years of age the only wonder was that he had last ed through it so long. The highly skilled medical men who attended him had not expected that he would get past Christmas Day, but the fine old heart that had urged him on to the highest attainments still kept beating the rich blood through his once sturdy old frame, and though his mind was perfectly willing, the spirit that had carried him success fully through so many ventures and long past the allotted span, declined to pass without a struggle. Mr. Mas sina was a fine old gentleman. That is the easiest and the only way for one who did not have knowledge of his youth to sum him up. He put business cares aside some years ago, and lived the eveni...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Five Tie in Women's Shoot. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 10 February 1917

Five Tie in Women's Shoot. Members of the Richmond Ladies' Rifle Club met on Wednesday night at the miniature range,: Church-street. Highest scores were:-Miss N. Jung wirth (3) 70bMrs. Pearson (3) 70, Mrs. Marshall (5)- 70, Miss 0. Hughes (3) 70, Miss Keppel (6) 70, Mrs. Barnard (1) 69.

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
P.A.F.S., No. 27. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 10 February 1917

P.A.F.S., No. 27. The fortnightly meeting of the Duke of Richmond No. 27 Lodge was held in the Foresters' Hall on Tues day, January 23. W.M. Bro. Geo. Cole presided. One new member was initiated. The sick visitors reported the death of Bro. Buck, and the lodge rose in silence in memory. Bro. R. Lowe gave a report on the rifle shoot ing competition. After business the members had an enjoyable game of bowls. P.M. Bro. E. Miller's team won by two points from P.M. W. Tay lor's team.

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A German Prisoners' Compound INTERESTING IMPRESSIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 10 February 1917

A German Prisoners*: Compound INTERESTING IMPRESSIONS. '"Somewhere in- Scotland" nearly 5000 Germans are interned. An air of mystery surrounds the-.camp, en trance to which is difficult to obtain. It- is, in reality, a small German town, alien .in customs, in sympa thies and in thought (says H.C.W. in the "Glasgow Weelly Herald"). Our first impression is that our en emies are men of excellent physique, tall and heavy and strong, but stolid, slow of -movement and ungainly. There are no women in the com pound, but both prisoners of war and interned civilians are here. There are sailors from the Blncher and the Mainz, Saxons, Bavarians, and men of the Prussian Guard, all wearing their uniforms. They regard us with varying expressions, a few with arro gant defiance, some with bovine in difference, and others with that friendly, humorous twinkle in their eyes that we used to expect from simple Hans and Frit7. Willing Guests. "Do the prisoners ever try to es cape?" we asked a guard. "Esca...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Cross—The Crown. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 10 February 1917

The Cross-The Crown. By Frederic A. Felton. His Majesty had no further use for the services of Private James Step ney, of the 69th Middleworths. . Jimmy was an out-and-out rotter. Everybody who knew him was aware of the fact. Indeed, he himself real ised it as he slouched along the dusty road wondering what on earth was to become of him. Almost against his will he indulged in a brief retrospect. The result was disconcerting. A rapid search of his past revealed no redeeming feature. Twenty-two years of life brought up no single action to which he could point with a spark of pride. At ::his elementary school in the East End of London he had been a veritable terror. The transit to the reformatory had been automatic. But no amount of punishment could erad icate the element of evil from his na ture. - He was a thief, a wastrel, a basher of policemen, and a potential burglar before he was eigh.een. And indications were not lacking that in tinie he might become something worse. Indeed, one...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BREATHING. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 10 February 1917

BREATH ING. Mothers do not pay sufficient at tention to their. children's breathing. A baby is allowed to breathe.through I its mouth while asleep, until the habit is crystalised.and it is difficult to break. If a child persistently biroa thes through its mouth, it should be taken to a doctor,and be examin ed to see if. there is any reason for the habit. If not, the mother should gently press the lips together until the child breathes quietly through the nose; If this is persisted in for a few evenings the child will soon learn. unconsciously to breathe cor rectly. The breathing through the mouth allows large numbers of germs t enter the lungs and throat, and may set up unhealthy conditions of the body. The nose is the natural opening/for the air to pass through, as the passages are fringed with tiny hairs, which act as a filter, prevent the entrance of germs, and the long air channels, warm the air before it reaches the lungs.

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Red Pepper Shells EXPLOSION CAUSES TEARS TO FLOW. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 10 February 1917

Red Pepper Shells EXPLOSION CAUSES TEARS TO FLOW. Lacrimal is the name given to the German weapon which on exploding causes a copious flow of tears and irri tation in the eyes. There has been considerable discussion concerning the nature of the tear exciting substance employed, but thus far its contents do not appear to have-been definitely determined. One of the most power ful of tear excitants is acrolein, which Is obtained when fats of glycerine are burned, but the enemy would certain ly not destroy fatty substances in this way,- Another. acrid gas Is- for; maldehyde, which niay be litilsed. There is a general opinion, however, that common-pepper has. been used, the tear exciting constituent being ex pelled from: the.pepper by heat. Large quantities of red pepper are grown in Hiungary, so that there would be. no difficulty-in obtaining supplies. Pro; tective measures are comparatively easy. to adopt against the 'tear shells.

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BIBLES. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 10 February 1917

BIBLES. He was a soldier seedy and sad, a warrior long returned; A camp-cook lazy from dixle-land, by the cook-house furnace burned. To hear him tell of the Turks he'd slain was to live his old battles anew, But the only foe he ever had fought were Arabs who stole the stew. "It's a gory ungrateful world," said he, as I purchased another pot, "An' they won't berleeve the dinkum chat when I tell 'em where I got shot." And he drew from his pocket a Bible old, yellow and worn with years, And the splashes and blots on the title page he mentioned were "mother's tears." The Bible had saved his life for him at the Battle of Bluff-an'-Kid, "An' the price of the Bible an' bullet an' all was a paltry arf a quid." He made it a dollar, as he was broke, but his soul with a sorrow was stirred As the thought of the mother long laid to rest who'd given him God's Good Word. But again in that self-same sinful bar I met that soldier tug, With another bulleted Bible sold to annother bullpeted mu, And ag...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
STILL MORE KAISER EPITAPHS. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 10 February 1917

STILL MORE KAISER EPITAPHS. Here lies William, the King of Prussia, He died of "England, France and Rus sia." Too late he died, who was not worth the life Of the least Belgian child, or man or wife. The only German soldier who never fired a gun, The only German father who never lost a son, Bill called himself the Lord of War, but never faced a fight. He died in bed, I'll bet you, with the doctors day and night! "Lusitania Will" lies here Few will weep while millions cheer. Here lies the Kaiser, who (mark you well!) Hath made of God a mock, of earth a hell. - His nation's mothers mourn their ruler's fate, Not that he.died, but that he died too late! Quaint yarns drifted down from the back of beyond about native freaks and mysteries long before De Rouge mont vent home from God knows where to pull the legs of Londoners about darkest Mid-North Australia. There was a persistent story in the late 'nineties about two white gins who had been descried by travellers in a tribe of particularly...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AUDITORIUM. "A Daughter of the Gods." [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 10 February 1917

AUDITORIUM, "A Daughter of the Gods." Huge audiences that crowded even the spacious Auditorium greeted the first Melbourne productions of the big spectacular picture play, A Daughter of the Gods. It is in many ways a re markable screen play. It is ingenious in its conception, magnificent in its ensemble, wonderful in its photo graphy and altogether superlative in its whole production. Making it even more notable to Australians is the fact that Annette Kellermann, one of our own countrywomen, was especially se lected above all other film actresses to play the special feature lead. Upon her physical beauty and prowess turns much of the plot of the fairy story for such it is. Miss Kellermann has scored many triumphs. This is her greatest. The play runs for nearly three hours and is crowded with incidents which happen amidst most picturesque scenes. We have been told of the great cost of production, of the huge numbers of men, women and children employed in its making, of the long perio...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SINKING OF THE ARABIA. PASSENGER'S DESCRIPTIVE STORY. "A PUFF OF SMOKE AND A LOT OF WRECKAGE." [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 10 February 1917

S~INKING OF THE ARABIA. PASSENGER'S DESCRIPTIVE .STORY. "A PUFF OF SMOKE AND A LOT OF WRECKAGE." Interesting details of the torpedoing of the Arabia are given by Mr. L. B. Stockdale, who left Melbourne under engagement to Vickers Ltd. as a mu nition worker, in writing from London to Miss Elsie Smith, of Burnley. Mr. Stockdale is the eldest son of MIr. and Mrs. B. Stockdale, of Punt Hill, South Yarra, and before leaving for England was employed by the engineeYing firm. of Werner and Co., Victoria-street. He was well known in Burnley as the popular instructor of St. Bartholo mew's Young Men's Club and Gymna slum. He writes: The.sea was very calm. I was play ing cards with my life-belt on. During the game I took it off and laid it down alongside me. After playing for some time the two sailors whom we were playing with asked the other fellow and I to accompany them to their cab ins to see some silk things they had collected in China and Japan. Their cabins were in the first saloon on th...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BONDI BREEZES. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 10 February 1917

BONDI BREEZES. By Frank Sheedy. Bondi may be reached by either of two routes. By the direct one the pas senger can reasonably expect safer deliverance at his destinatioa, for the track passes over country that is, for the most part, of tolerable gradient and curvature, running, as it does, through Darlingliurst, Paddington, Centennial Park and Waverley. This route is not without a gleam of pic turesqueness and legendary romance, tinged with just a spice of things war like; for the Centennial Park is truly grand as the tram passenger, at its very apex, gazes down into the valley of gardens, trees and water, whilst just beyond is the graveyard of so many high hopes and deep-laid schemes of those who have tempted fickle Mistress Fortune--the Rand wick Racecourse. It is said that on many a moonlit night a myriad mystic forms could be seen re-wending their very weary way up the steeps of the park toward their east-suburban homes. These, 'twas said, were the ghosts of disillusioned and di...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HER ITINERARY. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 10 February 1917

HER ITINERARY. "Where are you going, My pretty maid?" "I'm going a-shopping, Sir," she said. '"May I go with you, My pretty maid?" "Why, yes, certainly; if you'll agree to chase with me from one store to another, up and down stairs and in and out of elevators, the way I've got to; wait for me to have a fit ting; help me pick out some bridge prizes; give me the benefit of your advice in selecting presents for my four brothers; take me to lunch some where; carry a few bundles and bring me home in a taxi, Sir," she said. -Sydney "Bystander." "You say my husband needs exer cise, but he won't take any, and I don't know how to make him," said a woman plaintively. "Is there any way in which we can force him to exercise?" "Did you ever try, on windy days, making him wear a hat that will be sure to blow off?" asked the doctor. -"Buffalo Express." An American paper solemnly de scribes the grafting of a tomato-shoot on to a potato plant, so as to obtain a crop of fruit above ground and of root...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SOUL SONGS AND SHORT SKIRTS. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 10 February 1917

SOUL SONGS AND SHORT SKIRTS. The great literary lights have al ways mirrored the modes of their time. If our great Master Poets were living to-day,, might not the fashion. ably abbreviated skirts creep . into their songs? Can we not imagine, for instance, Sir John. Suckling writing thus: Her limbs beneath her* knee-length skirt, Like long-necked geese steal in and out, As if they loved the light; And, oh, they dance in.such a way! No pair in all the cabaret-: Is half so fine a sight! Or might not Gray make certhin lines of his "Elegy" readi.:. The curfew tolls the knell of parting day, The silk-clad calves turn toward the Tango Tea; The gilded youth, caught by their sinuous. sway,. - Will not go home while there is one to see! Then Longfellow would . probably. say: Legs of women oft remind us Things. of beaut-y- we shuld be, And departing leave: behind us Memories ot's'3yih etry. Burns' lovey. sng ?might also read: Oh, my love she -lWateth red, red hose, ... They were newly-sprung i...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE SHORTAGE OF FOOD IN GERMANY. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 10 February 1917

THE SHORTAGE"OF FOOD IN GERMANY. Husband: "What are you laughing about?" Wife: "Why, it's so funny! -This cookery book says. 'Take a-pound of butter, a dozen eggs, and a pound of sugar!' "-"Fliegende Blatter," Ber lin. An aiuthority estimates that in about 20 years the American language will be unintelligible to English-ears. Then we shall, doubtless, hear the latest American representative of Hamlet de livering the famous speech something like this: To quit or not to quit-that's what I'm up against Is it the cheese to sit still in the game, And take: whatever's coming to you yet, Or to put up a rough-house 'gainst a bunch of troubles . Till they are down and out? Who'd stand for all the hardest kind ofluck, The frozen face; the main guy's jolly ing,. The fly cop's- club, the--handling of a. lemoft When any old time he'can chase him self ...... Into the boneyard?. Edith: I:don't intend to be married until after I am thirty. Maud: And I don't intend to be thirty i'until after I am ma...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
From Various Sources. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 10 February 1917

From Various Sources. Be it ever so homely, there's no face like your own.-"Jack o' Lan tern." The burglar had just begun hister-r. and was assigned to work in the broomn factory. Near him was an oldish man who studied him intently arid seemed to be awaiting an opportuiiity to say something. It came while the over seer was at the ice water tank. "How long are you in for?" he whispered. "Twelve years," replied the new comer. The veteran looked around nervous ly and thrust a letter in the burglar's hand. "I'm in for life," he said. "Mail this when you get out'"-"Johnson's Smoke Rings." The pug who funks and runs away Quite easy scoops a prince's pay. -Les. Darcy. In one of, the suburbs where domes tic help is more than ordinarily diffi cult to. obtain, many householders fall back on the casual:,nomadic lady who looks in for an hour or so every morn ing. One such-proved a perfect trea sure. She was clean,: tidy, thorough, and punctual; . every morning finding her in the back. kitchen o...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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