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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

rmmmmm$ WTWmmm' 'v V IJ' " 'YV W-f w1? ""fT 1 The Indian Advocate. Devoted to the Interests of Indian Mission. Vol. VIII. JULY 1896. No 3. Wrllti n for the aiV catb. THE REFORMATION -NO CAUSE FOR IN TELLECTUAL PROGRESS. 11 V FRA. ALEXI8 LOHMULLER After nioro than a hundred years of the most telling advancement in the refinement of civilization, the world has reached an epoch truly wonderful for its scientific speculations and wide spread intelligence. Owing, however, to an almost unanimous conspiracy of history makers against the truth within the last three centuries, all this won drous progress has been generally at tributed to the Reformation of the six teenth century. But since history is becoming a more critical study and old prejudices against the Church are dis appearing, there is hope that the world in general will soon acknowledge the failure of the Protestant reform in leav ing any good results all'ecting the wel fare of modern society or in any way promoting the intellectu...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

TT" T'V- J'' TaiwrpKRi?o?W3 00 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. j -i "r ' It would be difficult to see how good could come out of so much evil, how order could result from so much disor der, or how the destruction of the fine urts could be the cause of refinement that God may turn evil to good does not argue that evil is the cause of good. The Reformation was permitted to come, but history proclaims that it should have received a more appropri ate appellation. The world, too, has wonderfully progressed, but the Ref ormation is far from having caused it. The spoliation of church property and the ruin of vast architectural monu ments, the destruction of large public libraries, public institutions and of the fine arts, are all the work of the Refor mation, the destroying angel of all that the genius of Christianity had reared; and be it known that there was not one principle held by the pseudo reformers which did not contribute to the general disturbance. Strange, indeed, that after the denial of ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 63 ages had thoy acted with more per sonal freedom. Too had that it was not dono more independently and with loss glory to the Church, for as it is, it is impossible to speak or write of those times without bringing in the Church, and so the true light of history proves the contrary of what Protestantism of to-day would have it, namoly: that the Church opposed the sciences and the intellectual progress of the people. Every new discovery of the historical records of that age proves more the false hood of such assertions. But as mem bers of the Church, the scholars and artists of the Middle Ages labored per haps with too little personal freedom. If they did, it was a sad thing for fu ture generations that the reformers la bored with too much. The result of their personal freedom and their free acts asserts itself in the sad havoc and desolation all over Eu rope of everything grand and noble and beautiful in art and architecture. We must then go elsewhere to look f...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

WWPW yWfPj W yy1 ;t " wpwwwwwjjir ?: ir Indian Advocate. bloness and beauty may be found in their art or literature, and when Chris tianity was built up on the ruins of pagan Rome, it did not reject what was good and useful of the laws, literature and customs of the pagans. Christian scholars, profiting by the examples of Greek and Roman learning, carried the study of philosophy and letters to a higher perfection, while they pushed the study of architecture, painting and poetry to a high degree of perfection as has not been surpassed in any age, and far from being equaled at present. Philosophy received so much attention that the most intricate metaphysical problems were beginning to be solved. The Reformation put a stop to all this, and threatened to end all further prog ress in the arts and speculative sciences; but the printing-press having been in vented some time before that outbreak, a new impulse had been given to the study of letters in spite of the confusion and destruction...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

" "W J 'AJ?1 ' "Vf 'f ' ' sBmmmmmimtnmimmfKm'fmmimm TT "-vi 'ji)'"rw- TIJ5? INDIAN ADVOCATE. 65 INDIANS AND AGRICULTURE. The Choyonne and Ara)ahoe Indians are not making the headway in agricul tural pursuits which their admirers pre dicted at the time of the allotment. In fact, they aro not making any headway at all. According to their way of thinking, labor is dishonorable, and they arc total abstainers there from. They refuse to live on their allotments, pro foring to continue the cus tom of dwelling in villages on a bank of a stream near some trading point. There is an occasional exception to prove the rule. Once in a while an Indian will got in lino with civiliza tion's march and start out to carve his way to fame and fortune, and he gen erally succeeds. It is the Indian's nature never to give up, and once in the right direction, ho will go to the front over obstacles which often cause his pale faced neighbor to hesitate, But cases of Indian in dustry and success are few and far...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

ray, v . jV,vLy'gf jJTCJPW 'gF,i,,. TWr"" 1 -,!ir7'lp! 00 TJIE INDIAN ADVOCATE. J, - thoir rations at the agency, located five miles from El Reno, once a month, on what is known as issue day. typhis is a great day for the Indians. It is the day on which they everlastingly rob the government. The rations are issued by families, at so much a mem ber. The head of the household gath ers together his children and as many of his neighbors' children as he can handle without creating suspicion in the minds of the government officers, and draws rations for the whole crowd. Likely -the same children will lino up for rations a dozen times a day, but as they all look alike, the officers fail to detect the fraud. The Indians dispose of their surplus rations to traders. The money due the Indians from the government is paid quarterly. It docs not last long. The traders at the agency and the merchants in town get the most of it on pay day for bright-colored clothes and trinkets. The photogra phers ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

wp.- TTi wmimmimmm THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 67 that they will do it and move to some out-of-the-way region where they will not bo bothered by the white man. There are those, however, who think that in twenty years they will have be come settled and a part of the common wealth of Oklahoma. The Cheyenne and Arapahoe Indians came from Colorado in 1S6H, and from that time until they were located in Oklahoma they occupied the western part of Indian Territory and Southwest Kansas. They were at Fort Larned from 1S65 to 1SGS. They had no res ervation prior to their present one, except under the treaty of 'G7, made at Medicine Lodge, and which was part of theChorokee out let, or strip, which they did occupy. The Northern Cheyenne and Ara pahoes were at one time part of the united Cheyennes and Arapahoes. T his band, no w known as the Chey enne and Arapahoe tribe, was placed on the Cheyenne and Arapahoe reserva tion in 18G9. An other band of Cheyennes went north years ago and are provided for by ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

wpwwy 68 'THE INDIAN ADVOCATti. it Lfr " rsp lv k. The Presence of God is With You Still. Go to the uttermost bounds of the earth, From the torrid line to the zone of dearth, Frdm the city's streets through the prairie wide, To the foamy crest of the ocean's tide ; From the highest peak in the broad sunshine To the depth of the deepest, darkest mine ; In light or in darkness, go where you will, The presence of God is with you still, You cannot escape from the All-seeing eye, Wherever on earth you may live or die ; In life or in death you are never alone, Not even one moment of time is your own. Whatever you think or whatever you do, The eye of the God-head is always on you ; In pulpit or forum, in mine or in mill, The presence of God is with you still. Look back to the years that have passed away Since you played as a child in the light of day, And think how each moment, from year to year, Through the varied scenes of your whole career. Is kept in the record of time on high, Till yo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

7710 INDIAN ADVOCATE. 69 An Indian under the influence of fire water is an utterly changed man. TJio average Osage is a stoical, indifferent mortal in the presence of a strange white man. He is proud of his birth and his wealth, and it takes a mighty rich and imposing white man to make him blink. He submits to impertinent inspection by the white men, who stand about him and say "how?" and poke him and call him a "fine fellow," and make jokes about "poor Lo," because he knows he could buy the white man out body and bones. Consequently he apparently ignores the white man, but one experienced in Indian expression can catch a faint look of contompt on his face. And when the wh.tc man visits his country he pokes the white man, and handles his belongings and grunts out criticisms that makes the squaws smile and booms his reputation in the tribe as a funny man. But an Indian drunk is an Indian full of hilarity or light, as the quality of the whisky happens to be. One of the Osages upon his...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

"J--JJH-J"- 70 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. The Old Man at Commencement. Hitch up the ox-team, Johnny, and drive 'em to the gate; For me an' yer mother's goin' to see Moll graduate ; An' Jenny's a-bakin' biscuits, an' Sally's a-slicin' ham ; An' I'm just so proud o' Molly that I don't know where I am ! Yer mother raised the chickens that bought her boots; an' sweet To me was the daily labor in the summer's burnin' heat, When I thought of her bright eyes beamin', an' said to myself; "I'll state Thar ain't no gal in the country so fitten to gradu ate!" So I plowed in the summer sunshine, an' worked in the winter's cold ; An' I've bought her the finest dresses that ever the store-man sold ; An' I'll see her there, with her bright, sweet eyes like stars in the twilight lute; An' maybe there'll be some tears in mine when I see her graduate ! I never was much on learnin' for my means was mighty small ; But I reckon when Molly comes back home she'll know enough for us all ; An' thai ain't a gal in...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

wmm THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 71 St. Patrick's Mission. The writer of the following item was the guest of Rev. 1). Isidore. Ho describes li is arrival at St. Patrick's. Ennoit. As we ncared the Mission a number of boys dashed speedily forward mak ing up by their speed for the shortness of their legs, while they shouted a ten times repeated " How-do, Father, " at the same time waving their caps in child-like glee to greet our arrival. An anxious contest arose among the boys as to which of them would be the first to open the gate, and receive from their pastor a benevolent smile, or the least mark of recognition for his good will. All the sullenness of the Indian mien vanished from their faces, which now became joyous, bright and smiling as the little creatures again broke forth into a run, endoavoring to surpass the steady pace of our horses, while they did not for a moment cease to show, in their fashion, their contentment. It is easy to perceive that those children of the wilderness hav...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

72 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. tho children wore baptized $i Mexican woman with her four-year old child and an Indian squaw, whose girl being al ready baptized, acted as god-mother to her natural mother. The baptism of ti little babe closed the record of that eventful day. AN INDIAN DOG FEAST. The Ogallala tribe of the Sioux Na tion has just had its dog feast This is the most important function of the year with the tribe. Two hundred unhappy canines gave up their lives, and it re quired 120 iron pots to hold the ques tionable delicacy served to the braves. Each one tried to eat more of it than his neighbor, which is a suflicient tribute to the stew. The feast took place in the camp of Red Dog, about thirty miles north of the Pine Ridge Agency. This camp is located on the famous battle field of "Wounded Knee, and nearly every In dian of full and mixed blood in the tribe attended. The eating of dog was only preliminary to the principal business of the council, which was to enumerate the grie...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

vyy? - mmmmmmmm THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. VS accurately traced it would undoubtedly be found that some medicine man with a reputation as a prophet had had a vision, in which he was commanded to put the tribe on the war path. This sad tableau, the outcome of broken treaties or godless education, etc., has its counterpart which stands in bold relief. We are happy to give it by way of contrast. Says the National Review, some of the Canadian Indians arc not only civilized, but they are rapidly reaching the point where the lino dividing them from other citizens becomes indistinct and gradually vanishes. The outward and visible signs of this are numerous and emphatic. They live in comfort able houses with (lower gardens and graveled walks. They have adopted the clothing, the dietary and many other customs of the whites. They make for themselves roads, and they build bridges. They havo their own agricultural societies and their animal shows. They trade with acumen equal to any of their neighbor...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

V v V.3r,Y T ?4 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. amKMWIffiftVf3ttf?rVF,'r i J Vf'pri' i " Tjz Iidiai) Advocate Is a Review, published by the Benedictine Fathers of the Indian Territory, to plead the cause of the last remnants of the Indian tribes, and to give a history of their progress toward civilization. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of each tribe; their progress in education and religion; their occupa tions, industries, schools, etc., etc. Also, n history of our mis sions, statistics, and other interesting matter that can not be found in any other publication. Tho proceeds of this Review will be used for educating and converting the Indians of the Territory. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, Sacred Heart P. O , Okla. Ter. Approved by Right Rf.v. THEO. MEERSCHAERT, Vicah Apostolic ok Oklahoma and Indian Territory. Subscriptions SO Cent per Year. Single Copies 15 Cents JULY, 189G. EDITORIAL AND LOCAL. Some statisticslately published by the Givilta Gatholica are instructive proofs o...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

mmmmmmm THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 78 Wo have already noted the interesting fact, says the Ave Maria, that the arms with which King Menolek's men de feated the Italians were the identical guns with which the Papal Zouaves do fended Rome against Victor Emanuel in 1870. To this must now he added the "curious coincidence," noted by an En glish correspondent, that Baraticri, the defeated Italian General, was one of Garibaldi's red-shirts; and that the Ger man ship which, having been accident ally sunk in the Suez Canal, delayed the arrival of re-enforcements, bore the name of the old General of the Pontifi cal army " Kanzler." Eight tons of air are sent into the mines for one ton of coal extracted. On the occasion of their paternal feast day, May 27, the members of St. Bode's Academic Society presented a programme which, to the admiration of the muses and students of English lit erature, was as interesting and instruc tive as could be desired. Oratorical talent was displayed in a manner highl...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

1 " V T l-" 70 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. r William Perm's formal but kindly politeness impressed even the Indians with whom he dealt. One of the names given him by them was "The Good Big Chief" About twenty-five miles west of Sa cred Heart is a mission attended once a month by a Benedictine Father. St. Gregory is the name of this interesting mission, Eason its post-oflice. Thirty families of various tribes and nations compose it. French Canadians, Irish, English, Swiss, Indians and Germans are intermingled, though the Germans outnumber the rest considerably; hence this mission is popularly known as the " German Settlement." Like true and faithful children of Mother Church, the first act of these sturdy pioneers of the Pottawatomie country was to build a church the school followed soon after. The Advoi'ATK gave an account of the blessing of this church (see .July, 1894). Up to date the principal orna ment of this house of God was the piety of the faithful. "Almighty God first, last and in...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

mmmmmmmmmmm THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 77 t : ' i It is very rare to find ground which produces nothing; if it bo not covered with flowers, with fruit treos or -grain, it produces briars and weeds. It is the same with man; if ho is not virtuous he is likely to be vicious. It is a folly to shiver for last year's snow, for what is useless is dangerous. Rev. Fr. Hilary Gassal, O.S.B., left the Mission on the 25th of May for a tour to his native Alsace. The volume of religious statistics of the United States Census of 1890, issued in June, 1895, showed besides indepen dent churches and miscellaneous con gregations, 143 denominations, 1G5,177 organizations, 142,521 church buildings, valued at $G79,G30,139, and 20,G12,80G church members. To this may be added the net increase named in the denomi national reports of 1890-94 of 17,331 churches, with 2,356,222 church mem bers, making the number of churches in 1895, 182, 50S, and of church mem bers, 22,969,082. The ten denomina tions in the United S...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

78 THE INDIAN. ADVOCAffi. Defeated dishonesty is like a drown ing man its last straw is an all round kick out ag'.nst justice. The kickers go down, down, down. The origin of music is lost in the twi light of tradition. In Holy Writ, Jubal is mentioned os the father of musicians (Genesis iv.21), and the Greeks and Ro mans both gave mythological accounts of its invention. To come to later times, musical notes, or the gamut as it is called, was invented by Guido Aretino, a Benedictine Monk of Arezzo, in Italy, A. D. 1025. "I had rather have a fool to make me merry than experience to make me sad." As You Like It. "Jacket is alwajrs talking about his library. -How large is it?" "Oh, his library is in his head." "Bound in calf then, evidently." You might as well try to tell the amount of money in a safe by feeling the knobs as to tell what is in a man's head by feeling his bumps. There is nothing that a man can less afford to leave at home than his con science and his good manners. Bad ex...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

t rf"F7TJFrwqfN? THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 70 THE EDITOR. The editor who wills to please Must humbly crawl upon hie knees, And kiss the hand that beats him; Or if he dare attempt to walk, Must toe the mark that others chalk, And cringe to all that meet him. Says one : " Your subjects are too grave Too much morality you have Too much about religion ; Give me some witch and wizard tales, With slip-shod ghosts, with fins and ecales, Or feathers like a pigeon." The man of drilled scholastic lore Would like to see a little more In scraps of Greek or Latin; The merchants rather have the price Of Southern indigo and rice, Of India Bilks and satin. " I want some marriage news," says Miss; " It constitutes my highest bliss To hear of weddings plenty ; For in a time of general rain None sufler from a drought, 'tis plain At least, not one in twenty." " I want to hear of deaths," says one " Of people totally undone By losses, fire or fever." Another answers, full as wise, "I'd ratber know the fall a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1896

Wew 80 THE INDIAN ADVOCATfi. of him, always sitting apart sulking. Why can't ho be like the others, I'd like to know?" Now this was rather unreasonable, for only a moment before he had been finding fault with the others for being so carelessly happy ; but the fact of the matter was that Dan Conway was at war with himself, and when a man is in that condition he soon falls out "with everybody else. That he had a good reason for quar reling with himself there could be no doubt. The son of well-to-do parents, he had had every educational advan tage that money could procure, and when, at eighteen years of age, he had signified his desire to study medicine, his father had entered into his wishes and paid all his bills cheerfully. Hav ing passed through the usual course, he had taken his degrees and obtained a small but lucrative practice, and, it might have been supposed, was on the high road to fortune. But Dan had a weakness: he was too fond of strong drink and did not take the means to...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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