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Title: Cayton's Weekly Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 713 items from Cayton's Weekly, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 15 March 1919

If Dr. Brier used violence in ejecting Mrs. Barrow out of his office, suffering as she and others claim she was, then his con duct was unprofessional. Lei's make it so all fired interesting for the telephone company that it, like the Se attle street ear company, will fall all over itself to sell to the city. Every striker who reported, got his old job back, so it is reported, and we bet he was hungry enough to want it back, and want it damn bad. Back yard farming is again in order and you and each of you should get ready to do your duly, your whole duty and noth ing but your duty. King Coal continues to exact from the Seattle householder every drop of red blood in his or her veins. For the love of .Mike, back up. And again the Great Northern dock is an open shop and as a result hundreds of colored men are constantly employed at ex cellent wages. If any member of the late legislature of Washington imagines he got anywhere with his gnbernational boomlet he "has a guess coming." Jones,...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 15 March 1919

WISE AND OTHERWISE (By R, W. Thompson) All the brave men of the Negro race do not live north of the Mason and Dixon line —nor all of the trimmers and cowards be low it. Chronic idleness is worse than a misde meanor—as it is sought to be characterized by some communities. Idleness is a crime. We of the Negro race have bigger propo sitions on hand than the matter of "getting even" with some individual for a personal grievance. We told you that we would be in the war to the finish. A Negro regiment was nearest to the German line when the armistice was signed. Why not a five-year government control of the railway systems, to try out the whole problem of what is best for both the people and the railroads? The subject should cease to be an academic question. "What People Will Say" is a bugbear that has frightened out of action more good impulses than any other drawback that mod ern life can place its finger on. Do the right thing—and let the people talk. Roscoe Conkling Simmons has added ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 15 March 1919

STOLEN FROM THIEVES They were walking under a very little umbrella. Ho was modest and seemed to be nervous, and she finally remarked softly: "Charlie, I'll carry the umbrella if you'll lei me." "Oh. no. I can carry it." "Yes, Cahrlie; but you see, your arm takes up so much room that one side of me is out in the wet.*' "I know, dear, but what will I do with my arm! Won't it be in the way all the "I don't know, Charlie. Tom Clark al ways knows what to do with bis arm when he is under an umbrella with Mary Martin, because Mary told me so." "The man who can meet emergencies, who can rise to the occasion, is the man who will succeed," declares Charles M. Schwab, "like the chap who was one even ing suddenly confronted by a discontented wife. She said: '' ' Before we were married you used to bring me flowers every day, but now you never think of getting me even a bunch of violets.' " 'But, my dear,' lie protested, without a second's hesitation, 'the pretty flower girls don't attract me now...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 22 March 1919

J&uf£ch& iMee£fa PRICE FIVE CENTS ; CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOB CATTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 sand Aye. South COLD BLOODED MURDER As bloody as is the criminal record of Seattle no mnrder quite so cold blooded and heartless was ever before committed in Seattle, the old "white chapel" murders to the contrary notwithstanding, as when Ruth Garrison invited Mrs. Storrs to lun cheon last Tuesday and put in enough poi son in her food to kill twenty men, and the young woman dying from the effects of the poison in...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 22 March 1919

THE PASSING THRONG Mr. .-iiul Mi's. Rogers of Spokane were visitors in Seattle for a few days the week past. For the past sixty days Mr. lioj^is has been in the employe of the legislature and after the adjournment they came to Seattle for a short stay. While in Olympii he hiid quite a laughable experience. In complexion he is a light mulato and on reaching Olympia he went to one of the best apartment houses to get quarters for himself and family. The proprietor saw him by the lamp light and he might be any thing, l>ut a colored man and he was ac commodated. On the morrow, however, it was presto change and he was told to sur render the apartment which he refused to do on the advice of a representative from Spokane and so he occupied his luxurious quarters during the session. How strange the white man will refuse accommodations to ;i man so white that he is taken to be white. .Mrs. Susie Revels Cayton was a visitor in Olympia last week and spent a couple of days looking over the ca...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 22 March 1919

THE NEGRO AND RELIGION Is the Negro losing his stronghold on re ligion .' A writer in the Boston, Mass., Ev ening Record, Philip A. Holmes, seems to think that this is the case: The growing indifference of the Negro to ward Christianity is becoming very appar ent. This indifference is especially notice able among the Negroes of the younger gen eration. Indeed, so strong is this spirit of indifference to Christianity that it is bor dering on agnosticism. But why Christian ity does not appeal to the younger and thinking Negro is not difficult to explain. First, the Negro has reached the convic tion that Christianity, as preached and practiced, is not the great moral force or agency for good that they are asked to be lieve it is; it has, therefore, utterly failed to instill effective good and noble thoughts in the minds of those under its influence. The younger Negro points with alarm to the persecution of his race under the influence of Christianity. The Negro argues further that the ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 22 March 1919

THE PEACE-LEAGUE BARRAGE In the Senate it's the league of fulmina timis. — Newark News. Berlin press looks up the League with dis favor, which is some recommendation.— "Wall Street Journal. The world is in a fair way to get together and abolish war, if the United States Senate docs no tstop it. —Chicago Daily News. Let the League of Nations start out, some how ; it can also accumulate eighteen amend ments if needed. —St. Louis Globe-Democrat. Some of the speeches against the League of Nations indicate high-muzzle velocity, but they turn out to be duds.—Manchester Union. When Borah refused to attend the din ner-party he showed that he wished to avoid entangling alliances. — Knoxville Journal and Tribune. If the League of Nations can not prevent war, it can at least guarantee that those in sisting on war will get all they want. —Dcs Moines Register. Senator Borah seemingly would copy everything from the Farewell Address ex cept the farewell. —Newark News. The League of Nations may be ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 29 March 1919

J@OMZch&^zi&6&( PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. , Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TE TEPiroiTlJ! BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South GO TO THE FRONT Who would be free must himself strike the first blow and self preservation is the first law of nature. The above thoughts have been inspired from reading an article written by Roscoe Simmons and a para graphs therein reads as follows: "Say, I complained, to the most famous American correspondent in France, why was it that you suppressed all the heroics of the Amer ican Negro...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 29 March 1919

The Lane in Seattle has no turn claims Mayor Hanson. It at least has no turn in Hanson's direction. The daily papers did not quite make a heroine of Uuth (iarrison, but they did their "damdest." March may not bo going out like a lion, but she has much the appearance of a polar bear. Germany says she will fight again be fore she will cede a foot of territory to Prance. Germany has shot off her mouth before. All Europe is shot to pieces just now and it occui's to us that the fighting has just be tniii. Another thought also occurs to us in this connection and it is Uncle Sam is bringing the boys home entirely too soon. If Tom Murphine does not build for him self a political machine in Seattle that will make the shades of the lamented Leigh llmil set up and take notice then we miss our guess. Down South the Democrats pull off some paw political stunts to get their men in, but none quite so raw as the one pulled off by the Standard Oil bunch at Butte one day this week. Either W. E. Mitch...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 29 March 1919

the place of the horse, and the aviator is contesting with the birds of the air the right of way. To the man whom we have gathered to honor tonight, I am permitted to present, as a small evidence of my love and rever ence, this beautiful cake, on the celebration of his birthday—lß6l-1919. For nearly thirty years John Franklin Cragwell has lived in Seattle—more than half of his life—and during all that time he has been always more or less in the public eye. He was the first colored man to go from Seattle as a regular delegate to a Republican state convention. He has plunged in real estate and in business and at times had money to burn, and, perhaps, did it. He is still active and wields more or less influence in the community. If he keeps up his present pace much of his use fulness is ahead instead of behind him. Here's hoping that he will see another fifty eight summers. Twenty-five years ago at Eoslyn I met James E. Shepperson, who was a visitor in Seattle one day last week. At the...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 29 March 1919

this myself, became the poor girl simply can't stand the smell of gasoline since the chauffeur enlisted." The attorney was amazed the other day when a peddler invaded his private sanc tum and began dilating on the merits of an ash sifter. "I don't want an ash siftre," snorted the lawyer, "but I do want to know how you got in here." "Every one needs an ash sifter," per sisted the peddler, ignoring the question. ''But I don't. I burn gas." "But you smoke, don't you?" demanded the peddler. "You win!" cried the attorney. "I know now how you got in." "How?" questioned the perplexed ped dler. ".lust sifted in," was the lacnoic reply. The l>oss called his typist to his room. "Miss Keytap, you are a very pretty young woman." "Oh!" said Miss Keytap, blushing. "You dress neatly and you have a well modulated voice. T might add that your deportment is also above reproach." "You shouldn't pay me so many compli ments." "1 only want to put you in a cheerful frame of mind," said the boss, "befor...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 5 April 1919

CAYTON'S WEEKLY PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOR CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South DR. BUNDY CONVICTED The conviction of Dr. Bundy for mur der in connection with the East St. Louis riots of a couple of years ago is perhaps the closing chapter in that bloody human holacust, in which untold numbers of col ored men, women and children lost their lives, and the most of the families living there their homes. Dr. Bundy did not lose his life amid the riotous scenes of that day of darkness, but it...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 5 April 1919

"I DID BUT I DIDN'T" Now that Ruth Garrison has plead tem porary insanity as an extenuating circum stance for having murdered Mrs. Storrs, a mighty legal battle is to follow, and if, per chance, her attorneys are successful in con vincing a jury that she was insane at the time she committeed the ruthless act she will only be confined in the insane ward of the penitentiary for a short time, when sickly sentiment will succeed in restoring her to the bosom of society. Had not Ruth Gar rison, after committing murder, been in fluenced by her attorneys who were look ing for a princely fee, she would have plead guilty to murder and that diabolical repro bate would have gone to prison and the newspaper notoriety would have been cut out, which might have saved the lives of other girls inclined to have their own ways. After much consideration we have reached the conclusion that the attorney who clears, or attempts to clear, a person guilty of crime, when said attorney is fully aware of the fa...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 5 April 1919

MISGUIDED FRIENDS As paradoxical as it may seem, there are times when we wish to be delivered from our friends, at least the kind of friends who are so insistent that we get what is right fully due us that they unconsciously accept favors that ultimately prove disastrous to the very ends for which they are striving. We can accept these blunders in good faith when they are made by members of the other race, because we realize that the viw point is everything, and as much as one conscientiously delves into a subject or at tempts to put themselves in the other fel low's place, it is absolutely impossible to do so. In a general way a sympathetic member of the white race has an idea of our hard ships and suffering because of our color. They know that we are unjustly discrim inated against, they know that we are denied rights and privileges, even the most learned and wealthy among us, that are accorded the most lowly and ignorant of any other racial group. They know that they can take our...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 5 April 1919

At a ghost story seance of a psychical society fl nerve specialist said: "Our best ghost stories come from the south. There's one about a southern wake: " 'An old colored man had died, and the night before the funeral a dozen of his friends sat in the moonlight in front of the de;id man's cabin, telling ghost stories. Suddenly from out the darkness above them they heard strange noises—a flapping as of great wings—menacing cries—and they dim ly perceived a formless black mass hovering near. " 'All but one man fled. This one, as he cowered on his stool, was seized by the grapnel of a falling balloon, for that was what the black shape was. " 'The grapnel, going at a great pace caught up the darky, and whirled him through the air at fifteen miles an hour, eight or ten feet above the ground.' 11 'Oh massa, massa,' he yelled, squirming and kicking in that weird nocturnal flight, ' I's not de one, I ain't de cahpse! Dick's in de house, he's in de house, back yon der!'" The young cyclist wa...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 12 April 1919

J&uf£ck&^zeeAfa PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South WAS IN MASSACHUSETTS That speech made by Dr. George E. Can non at Springfield, Massachusetts, one day last week, extracts from which were sent broadcast over the world by the Associated Press, read well and sounded better, but the speech, be it remembered, was made in Massachusetts and not in Mississippi, the seat of war, so far as the colored citizens of this country are concerned. We hope he speaks...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 12 April 1919

THAT COLORED POLICEMAN A colored policeman in Seattle is the newest thing on tap and for some reason the most of the colored citizesn of the city are proud 1o see him strut around in his blue uniform, not that the position in Seattle is of any special honor, but because colored men have not very often been per mitted to hold such jobs and it is a weak ness of the human family to always want the things that are denied it, which re minds us of the Dutchman that heard that the bank in which he had some money de posited, was about to break, and not want ing to lose his mone yhe rushed into the bank and demanded "all of my money right now" of the paying teller, and he suspect ing the cause of the Dutchman's excitement, grabbed up a roll of bills and threw them down in the window with "there's your money." With eyes bulged out the Dutch man looked at the roll at length and finally exclaimed, "Oh, then you have got my money. Well, if you have my money, I do not want it, but if you haven't ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 12 April 1919

in Ole not keeping his word and the police had to pay their fare, which would result in breaking the copper's heart. Evidently Johnny Bull has a bigger and better heart in him than has Uncle Sam, as the Irish question is said to be worrying the former, while the Negro question gives the latter little or no concern. Its a long lane that has no turn, Uncle Samuel. In order that prohibition will prohibit, Uncle Sam is training 3000 internal revenue officers to watch moonshiners after July Ist on which date the remains of old man Booze will be consigned to the tomb. The old rascal is dying hard, but die he must. Having failed to set the world on fire or even start an incipient blaze President Wilson is ready to sail for home. What a pity. If President Wilson leaves the peace conference what on earth will happen to his infant, little Miss League of Nations? That colored seargent that publicly de clared the white soldiers in France were cowards, promised to retract, but up to date has not...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 12 April 1919

LIFE FOR BUNDY lii July of 1017 the sovereign state of Illinois was disgraced by a race riot at East Si. Louis. To fully understand the condi tions out of which the trouble grew it is ucccssray to lake a comprehensive view of the rottenness of civic conditions in that un fortunate city. For years vicious political machines, both Democratic and Republican, had dominated its municipal affairs. The law was constantly suspended by those in authority, and because of the laxity of law enforcement low dives sprang up without number, disreputables from the surrounding country swarmed in, and all this, added to the supineness of the police force, made a situation that was well nigh volcanic in its possibilities. The Labor Unions, inspired by the situa -1 ion. thought the lime ripe to settle a long standing grievance with the employers of labor, who from time to time had been charged with importing large numbers of our workmen from the South. Our people, scenting trouble, commenced to arm the...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 19 April 1919

J&ufZch& PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at •the post office at Seattle, "Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South "I TOLD YOU SO" If there be any other four words in the English language, out of which one gets more self satisfaction than, "I told you so," then the writer has neither seen nor heard of them. Not long since a Seattle policeman said to us: "The average col ored man is not only a liar, but a thief," on which we commented at length some two weeks ago, and among other things said, the public records would show that ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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