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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1984

Dear Readers Just thought we'd let you know what's been happening to The Mountain Laurel. We now have subscribers all across America. Our top 15 states (ones with the most subscribers) are listed below, by rank. They are: 1. Virginia 2. North Carloina 3. Florida 4. Maryland 5. West Virginia 6. Ohio 7. South Carolina 8. Pennsylvania 9. Georgia 10. California 11. New York 12. Tennessee 13. Texas 14. New Jersey 15. Illinois FIREWOOD DELIVERED At a reasonable price CALL FOR RATES John Boyd Phone: Meadows of Dan, Va. 703-952-2020 Webb's Lawnmower Service, Inc. HIGHWAY 221 WEST - FLOYD, VA. CODY F. HALE, OWNER 745-43 53 AUTHORIZED SALES & SERVICE FOR SNAPPER , ROBIN . LAWN-BOY BRIGGS & STRATTON , TECUMSEH HOFFCO , FOOTE ,LOMBARD,PEERLESS HUSQVARA ,MC.CULLOCH , HOMELITE Rainbow's End In The BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAINS Here is a unique opportunity bo own a truely beautiful parcel of land located in the Heart of the Blue Ridge Mountains. The land offers complete southern exp...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1984

Page 10 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1984 MISS ORA AND MISS ETTA Mountain Mission Teachers In the early years at the Missions, almost all the workers arrived by train as far as Ferrum. The Norfolk and Western Railroad was extended in the IBBO's through Rocky Mount and Ferrum then twisted and,/turned around the mountains as it made its way to North Carolina. The railroad made Ferrum a busy little corrmercial center. Miss Ora Harrison, who first came to Endicott in 1908 as a public school teacher describes her arrival as follows: "After I taught four years in a rural school, I decided to go to Endicott and teach the one room public school nearest this post office. This section was considered the worst part of the mountains then. A twelve year old boy met me at Ferrum, the nearest railroad station. Ferrum is twelve miles from St. John's, but almost eighteen miles from where I boarded the first winter. "This boy was riding a mule and leading another one for me to ride, and said, "Air you the ne...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1984

A HILLBILLY'S VIEW I have been asked, "Why don't you move off the top of that mountain and make something of yourself? There is no opportunity for advancement there." Well I've pondered the question at hand, and here is what I have come up with.* I am not a person for fancy titles, and I live quite well not being a millionaire . Living among some of the best people in the world in uplifting surroundings year round, offers a way of life that money and prestige cannot buy. When I look out over these ever changing mountains, I feel them as a security blanket draped around me. I guess you could say the mountains are in my blood. After the rat race of earning my living in a noisy environment, I can come home to peace and quiet. If the notion strikes me, I can step into my own backyard and sit by a creek bank and listen to its soothing rhythm. Everything here is on an even keel. When I look out my window and see a new born calf being freshly licked, I not only see the natural order of thi...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1984

Page 12 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1984 The Mail Box The Mountain Laurel, I wish to subscribe to The Mountain Laurel for one year. Enclosed please find my check for $6.00. I saw your paper while in Florida recently and I enjoyed it very much. Yours Truely, M.L. Wingeart Deming, New Mexico Hello Friend, I can't tell you how much I appreciate The Mountain Laurel! It takes me back to a time and place that can never be again except in memories. How I wish the "now generation" could have pleasant memories of their youth when they're old as I am now. I have managed to instill a love for those mountains in at least one of my children and her own two. We spend a quiet week tent camping on the Parkway every sunnier and now they look forward to getting back to "God's Country" as much as I do. Enclosed is a check for a subscription for her. She'll appreciate it. We' 11 surely stop in to say hello next time we're over your way! Sincere Thanks, Mrs. H.W. Williams Athens, Ohio Dear Sir: On reading your...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1984

she explained it helped the hens to lay real eggs. Ha-ha. The weekends were memorable in Johnson City. Seems like everybody came into town. Here and there the hooves of old work horses would clip-clop as they pulled old green wooden wagons through the towering red brick buildings of Main Street. I remember a blind guitar player with a harmonica round his neck and the blind woman who held the cup. If I didn't know better, I'd say it was ole Doc Watson himself. Primus Dees (Mr. Dees to me of course) gave the best flat top haircuts in town. He used alum to make the hair stand up, remember that guys? Then a splash of i\ S J-60 Ar-Frame cabin & 10 acres in Floyd County „ |\ "\ Va. Cabin has great room with wood stove, kit- ® v / il % chen, 1 bath, 1 bedroom. 1 bedroom in sleeping \> \' \ / grazed and has been limed for the current seayl?oll^ n n s oo * 3 ° ,x6 ' block barn with hay loft. 3/4 acre Dry Pond - Nice split level home with S-12 Nice brick & f...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1984

Page 14 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1984 TRICKS & PRANKS IN DUGSPUR, VA. BY MONROE TIPTON I want to talk a little about some of the tricks and pranks the boys used to play in the late 30's and the early 40's, not thinking about the danger involved. Back then in Dugspur, all the houses were painted white, so we got us a white sack and put a rock in it. We tied it at the top, leaving a loop in the string so we could hang it on a door knob. Then we tied a string to the sack and hid, pulled it back and let the rock hit the door. It wouldn't be long before someone came to the door. Them not seeing anyone, they'd go back to bed. We kept this up for awhile, then we would move on. On one occasion, a bunch of boys went to Heath Kemp's using the old sack trick. When Heath came out on the porch, one boy had a bucket of cold spring water and dashed it on Heath. I never saw anyone jump up and down, pop his fist and cuss so much in my life. By the time he came to himself and got his old shot...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1984

BLUE RIDGE BOOKSHELF BY: PARKS LANIER, JR. MOUNTAIN STATE PRESS, affiliated with The University of Charleston in West Virginia, sent an interesting assortment of books, several of which will be featured later. For this month, one is of particular interest, Barbara Beury McCallum's MOM AND RAMPS FOREVER! My first acquaintance with ramps came seven or eight springs ago during a hike in the Mount Rogers area. A member of our group begged permission of our park ranger guide to pull one ramp to save for later. He allowed it. I made sure to stay upwind of the ramp lover for the rest of the trek. Since then, I have learned that ramp lovers are rampant, with whole festivals dedicated to the eating of that tuber which makes onions and garlic pale by comparison. Like chittlin 1 festivals, these are not high on my list of ways to celebrate the coming of spring. But for those of you who like ramps, and can gather them without offending the National Park Service, or your neighbor's noses, I reco...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1984

Page 16 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1984 MINING Continued from page 8 coal as possible. The miner uses a pick to break up the larger lumps and loads the car with a shovel. These cars are usually pulled either by mules or electric motors. Sometimes mules are used for short hauls until several cars are gotten together and then an electric motor is used to haul the coal to the outside. Quite often a vein of slate and sandstone rock runs above and below the vein of coal. The man loading the coal throws this out as much as possible.' The coal is carried to the outside of the mine in cars and is usually dumped there and carried to the tipple by a conveyor line. Men are stationed along the conveyor line who pick out any remaining pieces of slate or any other foreign substance so that we find very little rock or slate in the coal we burn. The tipple is usually built up on the side of a hill or in the hollow between two hills. The coal feeds into it by a conveyor line and is either stored or loaded...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1984

THE MALTED MILKBALL WEEKEND By Wm. Axley Allen It was 1964 when Ken Campbell and I went to Hickory, North Carolina to spend the weekend. I had grown up in Hickory but had moved to Greensboro several years earlier and Ken and I were making the rounds of my old friends. After getting lost on our way through Winston-Salem, we finally got my old 1 53 Chevy into Hickory early Saturday morning. For a reason I can't remember, we went shopping at the Sears store on Main Street. It was there that the malted milkballs caught my eye. The old fashioned display bins were pilled high with a wide variety of candies, but it was the malted milkballs that set my mouth to watering. Now some people like candy, but I loved malted milkballs. They were my favorite candy and even held a higher place in my heart than watermelon or fried chicken. That statement might not mean much to some folks, but when a Baptist preacher's son likes anything better than watermelon or fried chicken, it's a serious matter. T...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1984

Page 18 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1984 BELL SPUR BAPTISING, 1901 The pool is located just off the Blue Ridge Parkway on a road leading to Squirrel Spur Mountain and known as Bell Spur. The night before the baptising in the photograph, a meeting was held at Willie Blancett's home. He was bed ridden with t.b. (He had a wife and two small children.) He called his father to preach and he asked to be baptised. The next day men carried him on a pallet to the baptism. The people in the photograph were settlers of part of Carroll and Patrick Counties; most were farmers. We can imagine this event as a solomn and serious time, yet it was exciting, especially to the young folks. It was a time for them to get dressed up and go someplace and meet others. They were in their best clothes and on their best behavior. The young ladies had new hats, while older women wore their black bonnets. The day began early. They all had chores to do. The irons were heated for last minute pressing. The men hitched up ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1984

WILD FLOWER WOOD Jhlfe ANEMONE MMs SPRING W BEAUTY WOOD ANEMONE DOMESTIC BUILDERS SUPPLY ROUTE 4. BOX 473 HWY. 221 and 100 HILLSVILLE, VIRGINIA 24343 DALE MARSH 703-728-7191 S' A SO*, fa. BUILDING CONTRACTOR STATE LIC #7172 A E W UTT JR ROUTE 4 BOX 473 President HILLSVILLE. VIRGINIA 24343 703-728-7191 Office 703-728-2292 Home Meadows off Dan Food Market And Laundromat Groceries, Gas, Frozen Food Ice Cold Beverages Hrs.-Mon.-Thurs. 6 A.M.-10 P.M. Fri., Sat., 6-11 Sun. 7-10 703-952-2934 Meadows of Dan, Va. SPRING BEAUTY MARCH WINDS AND APRIL SHOWERS BRING FORTH MAY FLOWERS. I'm sure that in just about everybody's childhood memories are ones about May Day celebrations - The May Pole dance, with pastel colored paper streamers braided around it, and lots of flowers for decoration. May seems to be celebrated with flowers, as many flowers whatever their botanical name, have the nick-name of "May Flower". Even Collier's Encyclopedia had this to say: "MAYFLOWER, a cannon name used for plants...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1984

Page 20 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1984 "MOM GRACIE" by Ivalien Hylton Belcher My mother, Gracie Hall Hylton, was born September 15, 1915, in a log house near Langhorne's Mill. She only weighed three pounds at birth, and was delivered by a black midwife. Being so small and weak, she had to be held on a pillow. Mom was too weak to nurse, so they fixed her a "sugar tit". (That was sugar in a little white cloth with a peak on the end.) Mom Gracie grew and thrived on this very well. Mom's earliest recollection of her childhood is living in a haunted house below Mountain View Church, at the age of four. She remembers getting a big "whipping" while living there for hitting Great-Grandma, Mary Hall with a doll. Mom Gracie attended Mountain View School. Her home at this time was below the school in a place called, "The Dark Hollow". On her first day of school, Mom called out to her mother and told her she was sick and wanted to come home. That is what stands out about her first day of school. Whe...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1984

N. Locust St. FLOYD; VA 24091 A* £> V & V r'V Hours: 8-5:30 Monday-Saturday Phone 745-2822 QUALITY LOG HOMES AT AFFORDABLE PRICES The Beautiful, Natural Way To Live THE SHAWNEE IMPROVED « • Ridge Beam and Snow Blocks • Hardboard Splines ■" THE LEXINGTON . Gasketing 24' X 40' 2 STORY 1920 SQ. FT. I BiueSs^* 68 The Lexington offers room for families, room for entertaining and * our Hours of Building room for guests. The Lexington covers an overall area of 1920 Supervision square feet and features four bedrooms on the second floor, two OPTIONS: baths, and a spacious living room. The long front porch promises • Dormers Of Any Length room to relax and enjoy the great outdoors. For those who require • Storm Doors additional room, a larger version of The Lexington is available. • Erection Crew information available upon request Send $4.00 (Check or Money order) for the complete SHAWNEE LOG HOME Planning Portfolio, Illustrating 25 well planhed log homes economically p...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1984

Page 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1984 Folkways Jt" 1 ijfrL I C. 1= J \ P/ " o o \ / o%k Lmrfl By John Beard Whenever I get to talking about soap, my memory takes me back to a day when my grandfather, full of devilment, sent me indoors to show off my vocabulary of new words - words that he had taught me just for the occasion. Naturally, most of them turned out to be words that I wasn't supposed to say, and I remember wondering how anything that tasted as bad as soap could be good for anything. While growing up, soap was a continual bother - ma made me take a bath with it every month, wash my pair of overalls with it every week and even wash my hands with it every day. However, as I got to court in' age, I began to appreciate soap and even grew to like it a bit. Because of what it did for me, I'm real proud to be able to tell you how to make some. Now I've heard tell that homemade soap will "eat the skin right off your hands" but that's just not so. It's as, gentle as most and even better...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1984

United Nations. He returned to Western North Carolina in 1947 to devote his future writing in creative avenues. He wrote the book, THE CHEROKEE STORY and in 1951 became the director of public relations of the Cherokee Historical Association. In February of 1955, he undertook what he calls the best newspaper assignment in the world - moving about his native hills and writing a column called "ROAMING THE MOUNTAINS" for THE ASHEVILLE CITIZEN-TIMES. This popular and well received column ferreted out and recorded for posterity the old stories, traditions and legends, "which without his labor of love would have been lost for all time". This brought him the coveted honor of being included in "100 YEARS-100 MEN", a book containing condensed biographies of the men and women who have done the most for the State of North Carolina in the past 100 years. John Parris is married to Dorothy Luxton, a native of Michigan who was formerly an art teacher and designer in New York. They live in his home ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1984

Meadows of Dan, Virginia HEARTOF THE BLUE RIDGE /Laurel '' A3 ,»V'M > l "' " (i Copyright 1903 Mountain loure! Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life Page 24 A self-guided monthly tour of Mountain Backroads BA^ROA!«P by because of fear of getting lost. Each month this column eliminates this concern by giving directions over mountain backroads to seme of the most picturesque places throughout the "Heart of the Blue Ridge". Whether you're a resident or a long distance neighbor, we're sure you will enjoy this area's beauty. This month' s tour requires less than two hours and it' s only 21.4 miles from start to finish. The tour is a loop and will end where we start at the intersection of US Highway 58 and the Blue Ridge Parkway at Meadows of Dan, Virginia. The underlined numbers at the begining of each paragraph indicate the number of miles driven from the point of begining. This month's tour passes through an especially beautiful section of Carroll and Patrick Counties in Virginia...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1984

July 1984 Mo n (li l\ J oil riiii lOfMoiint ain I, i(V Floyd Hawks is truly a mountain man. Born on the side of the mountain across from the Puckett cabin on the Blue Ridge Parkway, Floyd Hawks was the 17th child born to Will Hawks. His mother, Serena Pruitt Hawks was Will Hawks second wife and Floyd was her third child. Not all of Will Hawks first set of children lived. Floyd can recall these half brothers and sisters. They were Riby, Erby, George, Bill, Posie, Bob, Gilly (a girl), Sis, Maud and Tiny. He heard talk of a boy named Johnny that died as a child. His sister Gilly, he never saw. She moved to West Virginia at a young age, married and had ten children. His mother had six children - Early, Elsie, Floyd, Victor, Elic, and Arnold. Will Hawks' third wife, Mary Bowman, had seven children, but only two lived. The older set of children were away making a living as the second family came along. Each child had their jobs to do and they knew to do than. Floyd was plowing the rough m...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1984

Page 2 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JULY, 1984 A MOST UNFORGETTABLE CHARACTER In my fathers many moves, operating water-ground mills all over Virginia and part of North Carolina, we met scxne truly unforgetable people. My mother often remarked that she dreaded the arrival of that magazine known as "The Dixie Miller". "He will just see another place he wants to go look at, and will move again!" she would say. We lived in church-filled little villages in the Tide-water Section of Virginia, and in remote lonely places in the foot-hills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. We absorbed part of it all. The cool clear running little creeks emptying into the dark mill ponds, filled with frogs, eels and leaping fish were such play places for us that we developed an Indian like love of nature. We could name every tree, wild flower and bird anywhere near. We also noticed how differently the mountain people spoke from the people in Tide-water Virginia. From our contacts in the Tide-water area, we learned a deeper a...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1984

A MOUNTAIN LADY OF LOVE ' • * J i %», ,-^hß "hUS*-* What kept this great lady going? Religious faith? Perhaps. Heritage? Maybe. Spirit and will to live, determination and grit? Possibly. Or perhaps the combination of all these things, and even more Born is abject poverty in a cabin on lower Round Meadow Creek during one of the worst depressions of the nineteenth century, just staying alive was a daily challenge. Her mother finally made it to the city where she boarded and housed factory workers. Soon the pretty duaghter was stricken by an unknown illness, W" SIB • « M < 1 7<- x MAiTOfl • ETHERBEE Realty and Insurance Agency To Serve Y Come see us at our new branch office in Meadows of Dan, corner of Hwy. 58 and the Blue Ridge Parkway, next to the Country Whale. Meadows of Dan Office: TUGGLES CREEK P.O. Box 817-C ESTATES / » i hiX Meadows of Dan, Va. Beautiful 5-plus-acre / jk /v \ ..... tracts, all wooded with /fil st 11%*.\ Ixo views of Dan River. These / Ml b...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1984

Page 4 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JULY, 1984 JULY 4TH, 1900 A CELEBRATION TO REMEMBER "We climbed a grassy hillside on our way to the Ballard, Fourth of July Celebration." The old man leading the way was a Civil War veteran and the five year old youngster by his side was his grandson. The time was the 4th of July in the turn of the century year, 1900. "The sight we saw when we topped the hill was awesome. From our vantage point we could see covered wagons lining the roads heading for the celebration. They were coming from Woolwine, Floyd, Vesta and up the "river road" from Meadows of Dan." Covered wagons were converging on the celebration grounds from every direction and there, before the widened eyes of a five year old, flew the first American flag he'd ever seen. It was homemade by Susie Hylton and hung from a tree that Ben, Ed and Tom Hylton had climbed and trimed the limbs from. In order to keep the flag standing out, they had attached a sapling to the top of it and left it sticking out pa...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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