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Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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City and Country. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 February 1871

City and Country. [Written /or the Pkkss.] Editoes Press—A man recently from the East, possessing good business qualifications and some means, inquired of an eminent lawyer in Ban Francisco what he considered the best business for him to engage in. "Agriculture," replied the lawyer; "it is the safest and most profitable as well as the most healthful vocation, both mentally and physically, in which you can embark." " Yon," he continued, "get a farm and live upon it; get out of the hurry and excitement of the city. Better for yourself, better for your wife, and a thousand times bettor for your children," The man remembered the early years of his life upon a farm in Indiana, contrasted them with the later years of anxiety and speculation in New York City, and at once took the advice. He is to-day the owner of a fine farm in one of the most beautiful valleys in the State. It is useless to add that he and his family are prosperous and happy. How much better it would be for many men and t...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HOME AND FARM. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 February 1871

HOME AND FARM.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE NEEDS OF AGRICULTURAL COMMUNITIES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 February 1871

THE NEEDS OF AGRICULTURAL COMMUNITIES. [By Dr. E. 8. Carr, Prof, of Chemistry and Agriculture In the University of California.] Having shown in previous papers that agriculture must be elevated in the scale of human occupation, chiefly through the agency of education, and what recognition European states have made of this truth, let us see what is being done in our own country in the same direction. In 1855, Michigan founded the first agricultural College, giving the neeessarx lands, buildings, $42,000 per annum foi the first two years, and such after appropriations as were necessary to carry out its objects. Mamial labor, with reasonable compensation therefor was made obligatory; but all instruction was free. The farm consists of (57(5 acres. The college building 50x100 feet, three stories with a boarding hall 43x82 ft., three stories in Light; also a farmhouse and out-buildings, and four professors' houses, are plain, suitable and convenient. The lands, in excellent tillage, furni...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 February 1871

CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE FOR 1870. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 February 1871

REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE FOR 1870. [Continued from i>nn<' r>7. Dairy Farming. Dairy farming, carefully and properly conducted, has always been one of the most profitable of the agricultural industries of the United States, and in no State has it paid better than in California. Among outmost prosperous and wealthy farmers are those who, in one way or another, have made a specialty of dairy farming. The people of no other State have paid so dearly for their milk, butter and cheese as those of California. As prices have rated heretofore, it costs an ordinary family more to pay their milk, butter and cheese bills than to pay for all the Hour, potatoes, beans, onions, and other strictly homeproduced agricultural necessaries they consume; and yet we are safe in the assertion that there is not over one fanrrer in the State that makes a practice of producing butter or cheese for salt; to one hundred almost exclusively engaged in raising wheat...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Notes of Travel in San Joaquin County. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 February 1871

Notes of Travel in San Joaquin County. [Written for the Pbebs.] Stockton Manufactures, They have just completed one of the most perfect pieces of machinery at the Globe Iron Works, Stockton, that I ha*ve had the pleasure of looking at for some time. It consists of a perfect outfit of the machinery for the Oakland Cotton Manufacturing company, situated at Brooklyn, Alameda County. The engine is 250-horse power; the weight of the bed-plate is 11,974 pounds; weight of cylinder, 4,540 pounds; of fly-wheel, 30,000 pounds. The whole weight complete is forty-seven tons. It cost the company $12,000. Keep & Bargion are the manufacturers, and William Burnett, of San Francisco, was the Superintendent. George West, Esq., 195 Hunter street, Stockton, is the largest manufacturer of wines and brandies, has more different varieties of each, and makes the best article of sherry in this section, if not in the State. Evans & O'Brien are the largest wholesale dealers in all kind...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
TREE CULTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 February 1871

TREE CULTURE.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE ALDER. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 February 1871

THE ALDER. A correspondent " G. H." furnishes us with the following notice of the alder, extracted from Michaux, which will be interesting to owners of lands along the Sacramento and San Joaquin, and in fact to all marsh land owners, everywhere on this coast: "The common European alder (alnusglutinosa) is a fine tree of more than 50 feet in hight; its trunk is generally straight, tapering gradually from the base to the summit, and garnished with numerous branches, tending rather too close round the stock, than to diffuse themselves widely; hence great numbers will grow in a small space, without impediment from the proximity of the stocks. The wood of this tree is fine grained, compact, susceptible of a fine jjolish and not destitute of strength. When perfectly dry it is in request with manufacturers of wooden ware. In France immense quantities of wooden shoes are made of it, which are seasoned by fire before they are sold. The alder takes a better black than any other wood and when ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
INDUSTRIAL MISCELLANY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 February 1871

INDUSTRIAL MISCELLANY.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
COTTON CULTURE IN CALIFORNIA. No. 2. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 February 1871

COTTON CULTURE IN CALIFORNIA. No. 2. [Written for the r«Esa.] BY JOHN Ij. STHON'G. When the work of planting is concluded, there comes an interval of five to ten days during which the germination of the plant takes place. This interval will be devoted by the fanner to the satisfaction of the numei'ons demands which a well regulated system of cultivation will make upon his attention. As soon as the young cotton is up to a good stand, and the third and fourth leaves begin to appear, the working may commence. The ground must be kept loose and mellow for two reasons. Ist. That the moisture may rise to the surfaco. 2nd. That the tap-root, now making its way downward, may not be obstructed. For this purpose, a light cultivator should be run through the rows, each way, throwing a little light earth to the plant. By this operation, also, all weeds or grass that may have sprung up in the interval be- tween the planting and coming up of the cotton, will be destroyed. The first cultivating sho...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE McCORMICK REAPER AND MOWER. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 February 1871

THE McCORMICK REAPER AND MOWER. On another page will bo found an Intereating letter from W. H. M., who sends us an account of tho celebrated manufactory of the MoCormiok Reaper and Mower Mannfaoturing Company, at Chioago. In con-nection-with this, we give an engraving of one of the machines turned out by that company, the one which they term the "Reliable." In no other matter lias our American inventive talent been turned to better account or followed by more important results, than in the improvement of agricultural implements. The farmer is indispensable to the welfare, to the existence even, of the country. It is therefore particularly necessary that his tools should be of the best kind. In our land of broad acres and extensive farms, it is necessary to have machines which will work with rapidity, that large ciops may bo grown and harvested. Much credit is then due to the man who invents improved devices for the farmer; and perhaps of all inventors of the kind, no one deserves mo...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SALT MAKING IN ALAMEDA. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 February 1871

SALT MAKING IN ALAMEDA. The Overland Monthly for February shows undiminished excellence. It contains the usual miscellany of good stories, poetry and interesting articles. The corps of con- ! tsibutors is enlarged by the addition of several good writers, and the matter is as interesting as ever. We can well be proud of the existence of such a magazine, tilled with contributions of Pacific ('oast talent, devoted to and ably supporting the Pacific Coast interests,- one which we can justly claim to be peculiarly ours, —and yet inferior to no journal in the whole country. The last statement is sufficiently well proved by its extensive circulation at the East. We take from its columns the follow ing extract concerning the salt works at Alameda:— In the salt works of Mr. Quigley, three ponds are used. These ponds are situated in close proximity, and contain each about the same superficies, or eight acres. The outer pond, and the one that communicates with the tide-water directly, holds th...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
GRAPE CULTURE IN THE FOOT HILLS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 February 1871

GRAPE CULTURE IN THE FOOT HILLS. Some one has furnished the Hearth and Home the following figures showing the profits of grape culture in the foot-hills of this state: — The cost, of cultivation and net profits this year of a small vineyard of loss than four acres in El Dorado county, are hereto annexed, the figures given being furnished by the owner himself: Thirty days' pruning in Jan. and Fib „. $<>0 00 Cultivating, men and horse 8 dajri '24 00 Hoeing, 4 iluys 8 (Hi Picking, 1 "> Uhj h 30 00 Tut»l expenses $122 00 Nineteen tons of grapes four and threequarter tons per acre were, without irrigation, gathered from the above small patch of ground, and that was a small yield. The grapes were sold for $20 per ton, or a total of $380. Deducting the expenses of cultivation from the gross receipts, leaves a net return of $258, or #04 per acre. ♦ The only reason, remarks the Marysville Appeal, why grape culture has not proved profitable in many remote plac...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
POPULAR LECTURES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 February 1871

POPULAR LECTURES.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Vaporization and Elastic Force of Steam. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 February 1871

Vaporization and Elastic Force of Steam. | Prof. John LxOONTB before the MECHANIC Arts Col,udox, Mechanic!' Institute Hall, B, F. Reported expressly foi the I'uksh.j What Boiling and Simmering are. Lbct. 111. Jan. '28. We have before considered, said the profeasor, the formation of vapors ut temperatures below the boiling point. We have seen that the vapors form ut the surface of the liquid and that their elastic; force increases with the temperature. At the boiling point, however, new phenomena present themselves. No matter how we may increase the heat applied, we can get no augmentation of temperature in the liquid. In the case of water, we cannot get the thermometer to rise above 212°. Beyond this point, the heat all disappears, or rather, it is used ivp in changing the state of the liquid, in the rapid formation of vapor. The ebullition or boiling is caused by bubbles of vapor forming in the body of the liquid and rising up through the liquid without being condensed. It is neces...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Spheroidal State—What it is. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 February 1871

The Spheroidal State—What it is. This phenomenon has been observed from time immemorial, by ordinary persons. Blacksmiths have often witnessed its occurrence, for when they throw water on a hot fire, many of the drops dance about quite a time without evaporating; and laundresses test the heat of their flat-irons by it, for if the saliva simply evaporates they know the iron is not as hot as when it dances about in a globule. But nothing resulted from these observations until the attention of scientific men was attracted, in 17r>(!; and in 1842 the matter was scien titi'cally investigated. Boutigny investigated the matter with great care, and arrived at important results. We heat a metallic plate or dish (of silver, copper or platinum) to a red heat over a spirit lamp and then put a few drops of water on the plate. The liquid assumes a globular shape, often has a roseate hue, and rotates rapidly, without boiling or decreasing perceptibly in size. When the plate is kept very...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A Whaling Incident at Monterey. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 February 1871

A Whaling Incident at Monterey. The Monterey Democrat gives the following description of the narrow escape of the crew of a whale-boat a short time ago. The party had struck and made fast to a California gray, a S2>ecies of whale they describe as particularly vicious, and Avere approaching him for a shot with the bombgun. There were a lot of porpoises around the creature, which suddenly appeared to be "gallied" by them, and paused in his race. The boat, under sail and running swiftly, got unawares within the sweep of the leviathan's tail, and when the shot was fired a stroke in response from that tremendous engine crushed like an egg-shell the timbers of its bow. The sea rushed in through the fracture, and the boat being weighted down with her crew, an anchor and two heavy guns, sank several feet beloAV the surface. The captain had been struck in the side by a fragment of the broken timbers, and was almost paralyzed. In the confusion, for a moment or two, no one thought t...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
OUR WEEKLY CROP. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 February 1871

OUR WEEKLY CROP. Our picture gallery has received a fine addition in an engraving of Sunset on tho Const. with an account of Mr. Prang, from one of whose chromos this engraving is taken. Our library of Mechanical and Scientific Progren has also been largely increased. One Bound East continues his letters, this time from Chicago; an example conies to us from Montana of an Agricultural Mining District; the last First Railroad and First Locomotive pass by our house. Having read all about these things, Prof. Can tells us more oonoerniag the Needs of Agricultural Communities, and gives a very interesting account of the different Agricultural Colleges in each State of the Union; and then we are served with a lunch of the State Agricultural Society Report, and with Notes from San Joaquin County, which we enjoy in tin B'iade of our grove, where we are now cultivating the Alder, and are introducing a Substitute for the Sugar Maple. Mr. Strong leads us through our Cotton Fields, telling us ju...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
PROGRESSIVE AGRICULTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 February 1871

PROGRESSIVE AGRICULTURE. HOW TO MAKE HAPPY HOMES TOR THE FAItMEIS. One of the most important and a truly legitimate result of progressive agriculture is the social and mental improvement which it introduces into the household of the farmer. According as the practice, of agriculture becomes improved; according as men excel in the cultivation of the soil, to the same extent does the social condition of the farmer advance. Intelligence, education, refinement and prosperity go hand in hand. As the farmer begins to regard his avocation as one of progress, and brings to his aid the power of the intellect, he craves a different style of living from that which satisfies the uneducated mind; and his improved system of farming gives him the means to gratify such advanced taste. He raises better fruit and more of it, and is rewarded two and three-fold from tho same orchard. Just so with his grain, root and grass crops. His stock is improved in a similar ratio, and the increased pro tits from e...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
INTRODUCTION OF GAME INTO CALIFORNIA. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 February 1871

INTRODUCTION OF GAME INTO CALIFORNIA. A correspondent of the California Horticulturist urges the importance of the introduction of game and fish into California. Game birds do not interfere with the -welfare of the farmer, with the exception of the wild pigeon, whoso presence should not be encouraged. The birds most desirable to introduce are the varieties of the goose, and partridge families; the European pheasant, and the golden and the silver pheasant of China, and the wild turkey. Many of the song birds should also be introduced —such as are useful in destroying insects and worms. The correspondent alluded to assures the farmers that the birds referred to rather subserve the interests of the farmer than otherwise. Although they may cat a few kernels of grain, they work a great advantage to growing crops "by destroying grubs, snails, insects and worms that are continuously and everlastingly eating both the root and seed of all vegetation." The time when game birds congregate in t...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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