ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Sunday Times Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 937,800 items from Sunday Times, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
937,800 results
TO THE DEAF. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 27 April 1902

A CURE FOR DEAFNESS.—The Indjan   Specific, lately introduced into this country, is absolutely the best remedy eyer known for deafness and noises in the head. It goes right to the seat of the trouble, and speedily effects a complete cure. A lady says, "I am indeed happy to tell you that the Indian Remedy has entirely restored my hearing, although my case was long ago considered hopeless." Testimonials from all parts of     the world. Sold, in bottles 4s. 9d. post free,   with full directions. (Protected by Govern- ment Stamp.) Address : Mr. James Harley, 23 Stockdale-road, Battersea Park, London,   S.W., England.  

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
PING-PONG. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 27 April 1902

PING-PONG. Tlie highly intellectual game of ping-pong has at last taken a firm hold on the sporting public of W.A., and judging by the large and enthusiastic meeting held at Cottesloe Beach during the week it bids fare to become our national sport. Cowhide Connor occu- pied the chair, and seated round the room we noticed several who had decided to for- sake the ''broads" and the ''bones" for the more fashionable game. Apologies were received from the '"Possum," "Billy the Bull," "Mat the Rager," the "Baker" and "Squash," while Charley Cuthbert wrote from Singapore, stating that the movement had his heartiest approval and he wished it every success. The Chairman then delivered a stirring address to those present. He said that it was only through' a wise dispen- sation of Providence that the delightful game of ping-pong had been discovered, and he was.perfectly certain that the Yankee game of poker had received its death blow when ping pong was invented. No more would a man face his o...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
BONEDUST. BONEDUST BLOOD MANURE. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 27 April 1902

BONEDUST. BONEDUST BLOOD MANURE. It is admitted that the only genuine article on the market is that manufactured by HOLMES BROS. and CO. Samples and prices quoted on application. Full weight and analysis guaranteed.     We desire to notify the public that parcels of Bonedust and Blood Manure are sold by   other firms, and represented as our manu- facture. We wish it to be distinctly under- stood that we have NO AGENTS. Clients   can depend upon obtaining the genuine article only by application to any of our branches or head office, Fremantle.   HOLMES BROS. and CO., Premier Butchers. Mr. W. B. Gordon, the well-known auc- tioneer, of Pier Hand Stirling streets, an- nounces in our columns a weekly market   every Thursday at 3 p.m.. of milch cows, pigs, calves, lambs, etc.; and also a sale every Tuesday at 11 a.m. of horses and   vehicles. Mr. Gordon's enterprise deserves the support and attentio...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
NORTH FREMANTLE STATION. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 27 April 1902

NORTH FREMANTLE STATION. __ "Consignee" writes :—Can you tell me why this station carries so many officers and yet the most I generally find is a "boy" of some kind running the place ? My business takes me there much oftener than I like, for if a truck comes in for me and is not cleared within a certain time, on goes demurrage. This might be right, but what annoys me is that after emptying the same, it stands there for I don't know how long. Moreover, this demurrage don't seem to apply to everybody. Further, you cannot get the information you want no matter how respectfully you apply. I go, say,   at 8 a.m. to clear. The stationmaster is on the Mole, and as the three or four clerical gents don't turn up till 9 o'clock, you've simply got to wait, as the one porter there is generally "tied up." I think this "on the Mole" must be A Standing Joke, for every time I ask for the station- master I get the same answer with a twinkle-in-the-eye sort of expression. Now, it is indi...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
THE HARBOR MASTER. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 27 April 1902

THE HARBOR MASTER. "Master Mariner" writes : The gentleman who answers to the soubri- quet of "Chief Harbor Master" is about (so rumor says) to take his de- parture from our shores, and as it is ordinarily understood this worthy gentleman boasts of having been a captain in her late Majesty's navy, the writer would like to know the name of the ship he ever captained and what are his particular qualifications —what active service he ever saw? Certainly the buttons of officialdom seem to cover an immensity of stupid- ity. What in the name of common- sense has this antidiluvian to recom- mend him but the braving of the companion ladder of an ocean liner under the command of experienced   seamen and protected by the presence of his own officers ? Truly A Great Achievement ! When this worthy gentleman came amongst us some 13 years ago the trade of our port was not what it is to-day, and it is high time that this fossilised nonentity should proceed   where his att...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
GOVERNMENT SAVINGS BANK. SOME NEEDED REFORMS. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 27 April 1902

GOVERNMENT SAVINGS BANK. SOME NEEDED REFORMS LYALL HALL writes :—I am glad to see THE SUNDAY TIMES has taken up the matter of reform in connection with the Government Savings Bank. An attempt was made during the third Parliament to have the People's Bank brought into line with similar institu- tions in the other States, but pre- sumably tbe influence of the Associated Banks was too strong, for nothing was done. The Leake Government has so far done good work in removing the restrictions making it necessary to give two or three days' notice, and the crowds around the paying-in counters each day show the change is fully appreciated. Still there are yet A Number of Reforms necessary. For instance, bank notes on any other State are refused for deposit, even if the exchange is paid. Cheques should also be accepted for deposit, and provision could easily be made for them being audited when collected. Depositors in Savings Banks   do not usually have an ordinary bank- ing accou...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
MISSING FRIENDS. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 27 April 1902

MISSING FRIENDS. Below we give a list of the missing in Aus-   tralia, compiled from the latest English, Irish and Scottish journals. Any person who can give information concerning those wanted is kindly requested to send particu- lars to the Editor of THE SUNDAY TIMES, Perth. The intelligence will then be for- warded to the paper in which the enquiry first appeared. Particulars should be sent as briefly as possible, plainly written on one side only of the paper. A "stamped ad- dressed envelope" must in all cases be sent for reply :— BLOYS (William), was at Strathdare,   Queensland, in 1899. BOLE (Ann, Emily and Louisa), left Dub- lin for Sydney 14 years ago. BRERETON (Thomas), builder ; left Pendle- ton, Manchester, in 1887 ; last wrote from Wellington, N Z., in 1889. BRUCE (Walter J.), went to New South Wales 10 years ago ; last heard of a year later taking cattle to Sydney. EDWARDS (Mrs. Louisa), nee CAREY, left Cork for Australia about 1844. HANSEN (Emi...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
SEND [?]T IN. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 27 April 1902

SEND IT IN. THE SUNDAY TIMES wants good original matter from any source. If any of our       readers know a good story with local color-   ing, a humorous anecdote with ditto, a bit   of special news not snapped up by some other paper, any interesting or amusing bit     of personal or local gossip, send it in to the SUNDAY TIMES. The SUNDAY TIMES will     take it. The SUNDAY TIMES will pay for it. We shall even take poetry—provided it is   poetry, or even blank verse, and not merely drivelling doggerel. We don't want things that are only of interest to one person, or   even to two persons. We want matter that   can be understood and read with interest in   any part of the State or Commonwealth.     Send in the matter and name reasonable   terms. If it is any good and worth the &...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
The Sunday Times SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 1902. BEASLEY ON DAGOES [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 27 April 1902

THE SUNDAY TIMES SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 1902. BEASLEY ON DAGOES THE West Australian Workers' Asso- ciation is just now in toe throes of an   internal dissension. Its newly ap-   pointed general secretary, Mr. Beasley, has been gaining considerable kudos   in the public Press by preaching from   the platform a species of universal   brotherhood and Christianity to all nen, especially if they are on the labor market and likely to join the A.W.A.   In his enthusiasm for the countrymen of Rienzi, Lorenzo de Medici, Dante,   Mazzini and Garibaldi—not to men-   tion, of course, the Borgias and Machiavellis—he has absolutely veered   round from national trades union-         ism to the most comprehensive and   general altruism wherein all and sun-       dry who can patronise a ...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
GREASING THE FAT SOW. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 27 April 1902

GREASING THE FAT SOW.   WHEN a State is commercially and politi- cally diseased, it is like a stagnant pool in which things foul, strange and grotesque germinate and gambol. An illustration of this species of the grotesque—even reaching the humorous in its hysterical morbidity— was furnished on Tuesday last at the send-off to Mr. Holmes, the banker. At the Palace Hotel gathered the great nabobs—a perfect bevy of fatmen—with the Mayor, Mr. Loton, in the chair. Among others who were throwing up their hats and pouring down the wine were Wittenoom, the ten- foot magician; Harper, the apple-orchard king ; Doherty, Sheik of the pleuro cattle ; and A. E. Morgans, the Mexican monarch. These potentates, it appears, on learning that Mr. Holmes, the bank manager, was about to take a holiday and go as far as England for it, and to witness the coronation of Dick Seddon, the Maoriland warrior, had taken round their seedy stovepipes and made a collection. The meeting that day was to a...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
DAY DAWN DOGBERRY SIX MONTHS HARD LABOR FOR GIVING CIGARETTES. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 27 April 1902

SIX MONTHS HARD LABOR FOR GIVING CIGARETTES. It can scarcely he credited that week after week we are exposing the shameful incapacity of the reckless. justices of the peace who presume to interpret or rather to pervert our laws upon the bench ; and that no notice is taken whatever by the authori- ties, nor any attempt made to restrain their   powers for unlimited evil. It is a thankless task to record these disgraceful episodes, perpetrated in the name of justice, so re- peatedly and to such an indifferent Govern- ment. The latest scandal reaches us from Day Dawn, where a man was sentenced to six months' hard labor because he was found in the back yard of the police station,   whither he had gone to take some cigarettes to a mate who was within waiting his trial,     whereat he was acquitted on the charge the   pouce had .alleged against him. The cir- cumstances of the case will, however, be best set forth in the follo...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
CYNICAL SYNOPSIS. "All the venal crowd." [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 27 April 1902

"All the venal crowd." —Byron.         Piesse now always spells "sandal" as   "scandal" wood. When is Kingsmill going to bring Piesse to task over that Kurrawang perjury?   Nanson wants the State to turn publican   and sell him his whisky. The high freights on timber is a bitter   revenge for Piesse.     The new Conservator of Forests—a junior   clerk!       The new political league is a resurrection   of discredited politicians—all of them with   an axe to grind. The secretary to the State Publican   League is not Walter James, the member   for East Perth. The work done in the railway workshops   generally costs about 28 per cent. more than similar work turned out elsewhere.   The local Socialists have forwarded their sympathy...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
VERSE—AND WORSE. "To cheat thee of a sigh, Or charm thee to a tear." [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 27 April 1902

VERSE—AND WORSE "To cheat thee of a sigh, Or charm thee to a tear." -MOORE.   In Barrack-street. —Scipper: "What       happens when Greek meets Greek?" Nipper:   "They open an oyster saloon." Prominent Perth medico in Health-Con- ference speech: "The medical profession of Westralia has in its hands a powerful lever." Madam Lever?   ...       London cable: "King Edward held a numerously-attended levee at St. James' Palace yesterday. Those present included the Prince of Wales, Prince Christian, the Duke of Argyle. Among the prominent colonials was Mr. H. W. Venn." Though the news is winging and joyously ringing, From far away Wyndham to Gingin, On behalf of this State might a doubter inquire, From the person who sent us this staggering wire,   Where was Hackett, and Dawson Vindin ? . . .   IN SUNDAY SCHOOL. " Now what is meant," the teacher ask...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
THE TRAIL OF TEN-FOOT TED. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 27 April 1902

THE TRAIL OF TEN-FOOT TED. BY DRYBLOWER     [He, Sir Edward Wittenoom, only desired   that he and the companies he represented       should be left alone.]   The meeting is over, the axes are ground,   Sir Edward has spoken his speak, Displaying his ignorance vast and profound And diction decidedly weak.   He's the same Ten-Foot Ted, deficient in nous, But a trifle more fat-headed grown, Who thinks he'd be safe for a seat in the 'Ouse       If his critics would leave him alone.     It's a failing he's had since he entered the     world, And frightened the family nurse; In the shell of seclusion be nestled aud curled       Persuaded that fame was a curse. Coolgardie to him was a transient craze,       &...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 27 April 1902

NEWS URCHIN: "SUNDAY TIMES, Sir?"       REV. FATHER WHEATLEY: Yes, boy, give me two copies wrapped in the West."

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
SATYRS, NOT SOLDIERS. CARNAL CENTAUR CONTINGENTERS. OBTRUDING OUTRAGEOUS OBSCENITY. Gross Pollution of a Fremantle Girl. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 27 April 1902

SATYRS, NOT SOLDIERS. CARNAL CENTAUR CONTINGENTERS. OBTRUDING OUTRAGEOUS OBSCENITY. Gross Pollution of a Fremantle Girl. 1 The public were greatly shocked when   they read the gruesome details of the mur- ders by Morant, Handcock, and party, and the subsequent execution of the chief offen- der, as they had been similarly shocked when many months ago Mr. Stead, of the Review of Reviews, had published the evi- dence and details of outrages committed in the stimulus of lust on helpless Boer women by the disreputable section of the British army. But the public have rightly revolted at the idea preached by some that every wearer of khaki was a blackguard and a ruffian concealed in the King's uniform.   We should be sorry to think that there was even a perceptible percentage of Morants carrying the British arms at the seat of war, and still more sorry to believe that any considerable number are so utterly debased   and licentious as to  ...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
GREENBUSHES SCHOOL. A MEAN DEPARTMENT. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 27 April 1902

GREENBUSHES SCHOOL A MEAN DEPARTMENT The school at Greenbushes has a roll of over 100 scholars, an attendance averaging between 80 and 90, a pushing and popular teacher, and no playground ! The juveniles must disport themselves on the dusty roads or around the pubs., in the first place endangering their little lives through the reckless riding of the agricultural yahoo on the half-broken brumby, and in the second place polluting their morals by listening to the flowing language of the man who has looked on the beer whilst it is brown. A good area of land has been set apart for the purpose of a playground, but the Education Department is too mean and parsimonious to clear it. Meanwhile it is overgrown with suckers and sucklings, hiding stamps and fallen logs, which are a positive danger to the younger scholars. The head master has repeatedly approached the department to have the ground cleared and put in order, but he has been cooly told to let the boys do it in their spare time. Con...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
For the Farmers. RURAL TOPICS. [The SUNDAY TIMES will be glad to receive from its country readers, for publication in its agricultural columns, voluntary contributions of practical interest, which will be used with or without the names of the writers. Such communications, embodying the results of personal experience in farm life in any of its branches, great or small, with the lessons suggested by old methods or the moral taught by new experiments, will prove instractive and valuable. Any farmer who has anything of interest to [?] relating to his vocation will be welcome.] [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 27 April 1902

For the Farmers. Rural Topics.   [The SUNDAY TIMES will be glad to rec- ceive from its country readers, for publica- tion in its agricultural columns, voluntary contributions of practical interest, which will be used with or without the names of the writers. Such communications, em- bodying the results of personal experience in farm life in any of its branches, great or small, with the lessons suggested by old methods or the moral taught by new experi- ments, will prove instructive and valuable. Any farmer who has anything of interest to say relating to his vocation will be welcome.] Farmers are jubilant. Rye is the best crop for poor soils. Welcome change in the weather. An up-to-date farmer uses the disc plough. Creosote is most effective for preserving timber from dry-rot.   Italian bees are the only sort worth keeping. Cape barley, with a mixture of peas,   should be largely grown for green feed. The Yankees reckon an acre of rape equal to ...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
CLEARING SOIL OF ANTS. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 27 April 1902

CLEARING SOIL OF ANTS.   Make some holes in the soil with a sharp pointed stick or iron bar, a few inches in depth, and then poor into each hole an ounce or so of carbon bisulphide, quickly closing the hole with earth, or better, grass sod. The fumes from this liquid will quickly penetrate all through the soil, and be sure death to all animal life. The fumes will soon pass out of the soil, and will not injure it in the least. The liquid is very   destructive to all vegetation it may touch. If the nest of ants can be found it will be a   simple matter, to punch several, holes in it   and treat it with the bisulphide.  

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
ERADICATING THE ZAMIA. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 27 April 1902

ERADICATING THE ZAMIA       Mr. J. J. S. Barnett, of Maryborough     (Q.) writes on this subject: —" After     many experiments in destroying Zamia,     the following method is, I find, the simplest and cheapest, and the only       items necessary for the destruction of   it are arsenic (dry), a billy can, a dessert spoon, and and an energetic man at the end of the spoon. First of all I may say that half an ounce (a dessert spoon- ful) put into the heart of the plant will, after a little rain, cause the plant to die right out in a few weeks. As 1cwt. of arsenic means 3,584 half-ounces, it will account for the destruction of that number of plants, at a cost of about 35s., plus car- riage and labor. Stock can be kept on the country while the arsenic is working into the plant, though I am sure there would be no risk of ...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x