ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: World's News, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
248,232 results
America and Gun Inventions. REMARKABLE NEW WEAPONS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

America and Gun Inventions. REMARKABLE NEW WEAPONS.     The new pneumatic dynamite gun is declared to   exceed in destructive power any gun yet designed.   It is 40 feet long, and has a calibre of 15in. Re-   cently it was experimented with at Fisher's   Island, and successfully withstood every test. Five shells, weighing over half a ton apiece,   were fired in 71.5 seconds with an accuracy not exceeded by any large calibre rifled gun. During the last few years many weapons that were to revolutionise war have been invented. Whether it is that their inventors expected too much of them, or the newspapers unintention- ally exaggerated their capacity, not much has been seen of these marvels. The magazine rifle has revolutionised warfare, but if a half that is claimed for the latest wonder rifle were realis- ed, there would be another revolution, which would make such charges as those the Boers hav...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A NEW KIND OF SULPHUR BATH. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A NEW KIND OF SULPHUR BATH. Harrogate has a novelty in the way of a sulphur bath. By the application of electricity in a sul- phur bath a man is converted into a "sulphur coated being." In other words, the electricity, acting upon the sulphur latent in the water, de- posits the latter upon the skin of the patient in much the same way as electrolysis covers metallic goods with a plating of gold or silver. This process, according to the local practitioner, whose experiments have led to its discovery, is much superior to the ordinary sulphur bath in certain skin affections. The benefit, he says, is both greater and more rapid, for he finds that the deposit of sulphur actually placed upon the skin by electric influence is much more effective and curative than that nascent in the water. It is, in fact, driven into the skin, and thus keeps up the curative action until the next bath. The physician's experience with some of his patients is cited to support his theory, and the report of a ch...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE PRINCE'S ADVENTURE [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

THE PRINCE'S ADVENTURE. The Crown Prince of Greece had an amusing adventure the other day while shooting in the preserves on the Royal estates at Delkelia. Two soldiers, seeing a person in sporting dress, point- ed out that shooting on the Royal lands was a trespass. As the Prince paid no attention to the remonstrance, they seized him by the collar, and ordered him to accompany them to the nearest police station. On the way the Prince tendered a bribe to be allowed to go, with no other result than that his captors literally "ran him in" the rest of the way, and then laid against him before the police official the additional charge of at- tempted bribery. Asked for his name, the Prince revealed his identity, and had the satisfaction of cheering the two worthy fellows out of their alarm by presenting each with twice the amount of the bribe they had refused.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A GOOD DEFINITION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A GOOD DEFINITION. "But tell me, Alice. Is he—well, is he quite a gentleman?" Alice (after a pause): "Well, he's nice-look- ing, and he's got his handkerchief up his cuff."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Bank on Wheels. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A Bank on Wheels. One of the most brilliant ideas of modern times has just occurred to the local authorities who administer the public moneys of the town of Mezieres, in the Ardennes. The new scheme con- sists in an "automobile savings bank." The term requires some explanation. The inventors apply it to a new sort of motor car which they are having built. The vehicle is propelled by electricity, and contains four seats, one in front, and apart from the others, for the driver. The three places behind are arranged round a revolving table in the middle of the car, one at each side, and one at the rear of the vehicle. Writing desks are fitted over each of the three seats, and devised in such a way that they can be either folded flat against the sides of the car- riage inwardly or opened outwardly. The central table also contains desks, besides book shelves and a small metallic strong box. Such is the new automobile. The use to which the authorities of Mezieres intend to put their invent...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE RICHEST BACHELOR IN EUROPE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

THE RICHEST BACHELOR IN   EUROPE.   The young Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar, who was lately bitten by a hound whilst out hunting, holds the perhaps not altogether en- viable position of being the richest bachelor in Europe—indeed, he is very much wealthier than the bachelor King, Alphonso XIII., of Spain. The Grand Duke is naturally looked at with great interest by those Royal ladies who have marriageable daughters, and he has been betrothed in the imagination of German journalists to most maiden Princesses, includ- ing the good-looking haughty daughter of the Grand Duke Vladimir, and King Edward's sweet- faced young niece, Princess Beatrice of Saxe- Coburg and Gotha. The Grand Duke is nearly related to the Queen of Holland; indeed, he is next heir to her THE GRAND DUKE. throne, so that his marriage is one of great   importance. Notwithstanding his great riches,   which have accrued to him from various rela- tions on both sides of the ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NEW EXPLOSIVE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

NEW EXPLOSIVE. A new explosive, which is safe from detonation,   has been invented by M. Fiedler, of Moscow,   Russia. His explosive comprises a fluid and a   solid, and the two have to be mixed before they   will explode. The former is composed of nitrol-   benzol 80 parts and turpentine 20 parts. The   solid consists of potassium chlorate 70 parts and   permanganate of potash 30 parts. To form the   explosive 20 parts of the liquid are added to 80   parts of the solid. The former is packed in sol-   dered tins, and the latter in packets waterproofed   with chromic glue. A very salient feature of   this explosive is that even when mixed, should it become ignited by contact with flame, the sub-   stance will burn away quietly.    

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SCHOOLS FOB MONKEYS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

SCHOOLS FOR MONKEYS.     A New York journalist has discovered the exist-   ence of four schools for monkeys in the "Little   Italy" district of that city. The 2000 organ-grind-   ers who reside there obtain what assistants they   need from the managers of these schools. Each   monkey, on entering school, is given a name and   is taught to remember it. At the end of three   months a pupil of average intelligence is quali-   fied to go on the road, but a graduate of a five   months' course will fetch a higher figure. Among   the subjects in the curriculum may be mentioned   playing a tambourine, firing off a gun, smoking a   pipe, making believe to be dead, opening and car-   rying an umbrella, sparring with boxing gloves,   balancing on a tightrope, using a hoop and skip- &am...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MARRIED IN A BALLOON. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

MARRIED IN A BALLOON.   The first balloon ascension marriage in his- tory was recalled recently (says the "New York   Times"), when Sergt. Charles M. Colton, one of the oldest members of the New York police, stationed in the Tenderloin precinct, celebrated the twenty-seventh anniversary of his marriage to Miss Mary B. Walsh. The sergeant says that the really unusual fea- ture of his marriage was that it might never have taken place at all had it not been in a balloon. It was a case of risk all to win all. He and his wife were members of P. T. Barnum's circus. They had long wished to wed, but were without fortunes, and did not like to marry in that condition. Finally woman's wit saved the day. His wife suggested that they be mar- ried in a balloon. The scheme was proposed to Mr. Barnum, and he, always ready to take ad- vantage of a novel idea, agreed to give them a handsome dowry to carry it out. The ascension took place at Lincoln Park, Cin- cinatti, Ohio, ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CARDINAL AND POPE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

CARDINAL AND POPE. It was at the last Consistory held by Pius IX.   that Archbishop Parocchi, of Bologna, was raised   to the Cardinalate. His Eminence, who is one     of the four survivors of the Conclave which   followed Pius IX.'s death, on returning to   Bologna, after the election of Leo XIII., told   his friends that the Cardinals had chosen a   splendid Pope, but that he was afraid he would   shortly be called to Rome for another Conclave,   as the new Vicar of Christ was a delicate old   man. Cardinal Parocchi did return, but as the   Vicar-General of the "delicate old man" for   considerably over a decade, and to retire after-   wards into a comparative privacy of the Vice- Chancellorship of Holy Church. Last week he   celebrated, very quietly, the silver jubilee of   h...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BOTANICAL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

BOTANICAL.   Dr. N. L. Britton, Director in Chief of the New York Botanical Garden, has visi- ted the Windward Islands, the object being to obtain living tropical plants   and seeds for the conservatory collections. The herbarium specimens for the big museum are as complete a collection as can be obtained. The work is a continuation of the botanical expedition to the West Indies and Central America, insti- tuted in 1899, when Messrs. Heller and Henshaw   were sent to Porto Rico by means of funds con- tributed by Mr. Cornelius Vanderbilt. The mu- seum is obtaining large collections from various sources, and the Torrey Botanical Club has pre- sented its entire herbarium, consisting of several thousand specimens from the immediate vicinity of the city, illustrating the wild plants of the metropolitan district.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Lady and Artist. ACADEMY PICTURE INCIDENT. PROFESSOR HERKOMER'S STORY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

Lady and Artist.   ACADEMY PICTURE INCIDENT. PROFESSOR HERKOMER'S STORY. In "The World's News" last week a painful sensation caused by a young American lady in London, was published. In her story, Helea Vanderbilt-Wackerman, alleged that the whole of her trouble arose through Professor Her- komer, who had invited her to his house to sit for her portrait, and that she understood it would bear her name; whereas the picture appeared in the Academy simply with this inscription, "See- ing, I saw not. Hearing not, I heard." Miss Wackerman further stated that other painters had made jealous remarks about the picture, "caused by the fact that it would have been the most beautiful work of art of the year, overshadowing all other pictures in the Aca- demy." This is Professor Herkomer's version of the whole thing related in an interview with a Lon- don pressman:— "One day in the summer of last year two American ladies, mother and daughter, called at my house here without an introd...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NOVEL USE FOR PIGEONS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

NOVEL USE FOR PIGEONS.       Carrier pigeons have been put to novel use by a physician of Rockland, Me. (U.S.A.) On one occasion he was called to an island some 20 miles distant to attend a patient who was seriously ill. To reach this island he was obliged to make a dangerous trip. Before he returned to the main- land he gave the family of his patient six homing pigeons, which were to be used as messengers to inform him of the patient's condition. A pigeon was despatched as often as necessary, carrying   assurances to the physician of the patient's steady   progress toward recovery.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MISS KATE GREENAWAY. AN ARTIST WHO REVOLUTIONISED CHILDREN'S DRESS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

MISS KATE GREENAWAY. AN ARTIST WHO REVOLUTIONISED CHILDREN'S DRESS. The death was announced in England of Miss   Kate Greenaway, who revolutionised one form of   book illustration and invented a new style of   dress for the children of two continents.   This she achieved by her exquisite little pic-   tures of children and women, and her dainty   decoration, in some half-dozen picture-books,   birthday books, and almanacs.   In weighty foreign volumes on the subject of   European art, many of the best authorities do   not hesitate to place Miss Greenaway beside   Leighton, Millais, Watts, and Crane. Her   praises have been sung in Brussels, in Munich,   and in Paris as much as in London and New   York.   Ruskin devoted to her, and to Mrs. Allingham,   one of his famous lectures ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ANECDOTE OF CARDINAL NEWMAN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

ANECDOTE OF CARDINAL   NEWMAN.   The chief article in the November "Cornhill" is a series of long-promised recollections of Newman by Sir Rowland Blennerhassett, dealing inti- mately and reverently with the Cardinal's fond- ness for Italy, Greek literature, and a quiet life. One anecdote has appeared in briefer form be- fore, but it is worth repeating: "Newman, when he was a very young man, riding or walking one day on a country road, ob- served a waggoner sitting on the shaft of a loaded waggon going downhill. The man lost his bal- ance, fell to the ground, the waggon passed over him, and he was crushed to death. "Newman made a resolution there and then that he would never pass a man riding on the shaft of a loaded waggon without remonstrance. Years afterwards he was walking with a friend on a road in the neighborhood of Oxford; he sud- denly left the path where they were walking, and moving quickly into the middle of the road, went towards a heavily loade...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SHOULD ONE SLEEP AFTER EATING? [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

SHOULD ONE SLEEP AFTER EATING?     Dr. Schule has approached this question from the chemico-experimental side, and his results are worthy of record. Having analysed the stomach's contents in two normal subjects a few hours after meals, some of which were followed by sleep and others not, he finds that sleep has for its constant effect the weakening of the stomach's mobility, and at the time there is an increase in the acidity of the gastric juice. On the other hand, simple repose in the hori- zontal position stimulates the motive function of the stomach, but does not increase the acidity of the gastric juice. The conclusion is hence reached that, while one should stretch himself out for a rest in the horizontal decubitus after a hearty meal, he should resist the tempting Morpheus, especially if there be present a di- lated state of the stomach or if its juices be hyperacid.   —"Health."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
£700 FOR A BOOK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

£700 FOR A BOOK.   At Sotheby's auction-rooms on November 5th a copy of William Blake's "Songs of Innocence and Experience" (Edward Calvert's special original copy), printed by the author in 1789-94, from the library of the late Mr. F. S. Ellis, realised £700, the purchaser being Mr. A. Jackson.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
X RAYS USEFUL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

X RAYS USEFUL.   The post-office at Buenos Ayres has furnished a striking illustration of the value of X-rays in detective work, says the "Electrical Review." Jewellers have found that smuggling in registered letters from Europe was very safe, as the Govern- ment officials could not legally open such letters on suspicion, and it was finally resolved to in- vestigate the evil without violating the law. The X-rays promptly revealed watches, chains, rings, and other valuables in astonishing quan- tity. This evidence was sufficient for a court or- der to open the packages, and more than £4000 of property has been confiscated in a single week.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Novel Military Inventions. A LONG-DISTANCE RIFLE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

Novel Military Inventions. A LONG-DISTANCE RIFLE. A military device which may have an important bearing in the future is the telescopic rifle, also depicted by a sketch. With the improvements being made in rifles it cannot be very long before the range will exceed the limit available to clear vision. In such a case something similar to the device illustrated might be used. It is merely a telescope affixed in an uplifted position to the rifle, so that sight and aim may be taken simul- taneously at an otherwise invisible enemy. Ne- cessarily other parts of the rifle would need most careful development in order to meet the altera- tion caused by this added feature.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A HELMET RESERVOIR. FILTERED WATER ALWAYS READY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A HELMET RESERVOIR.   FILTERED WATER ALWAYS READY.   A novel suggestion is that embodied in sketches   of a new and hitherto unthought of helmet. It   may be so con-   structed that   the lower por-   tion of it really   represents a   narrow reser-   voir, this effect   being produced   by the addition   of a secondary   connection   which is fixed   over and out-   side the funda-   mental head- gear, being join-   ed to it only   along the base   line, thus pro-   viding an inter-   vening space.   Midway down this cunningly-contrived cavity is to be a ring of carbon (or similarly suitable sub- stance) entirely surrounding the helmet. In dis- tricts where during long marche...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x