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Title: Lockhart Review And Oaklands Adver... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 73,281 items from Lockhart Review And Oaklands Advertiser, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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The Camera. RENOVATING A MAHOGANY CAMERA. [Newspaper Article] — The Lockhart Review and Oaklands Advertiser — 13 December 1910

The Camera. RENOVATING A MAHOGANY CAMERA. A simple polish renovator that can be safely applied to a mahog any camera or other polished maho gi-ny apparatus is given as follows : ? It should be applied by means nf a soft- rasr'. rubbing it well in, and finally polishing with a clean, soft cloth. Raw linseed oil, six ounces; white wiue vinegar, three ounces; methylated spirit, three ounces ; butter of antimony, half an ounce. Mix the oil with the vine gar by degrees, shaking well to pre vent separation after each addition, then add the spirit and antimony, and mix thoroughly. Shake be fore using.

Publication Title: Lockhart Review And Oaklands Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN ENGINE BREATHING. [Newspaper Article] — The Lockhart Review and Oaklands Advertiser — 13 December 1910

AN ENGINE BREATHING. The 'breathing' of a locomotive — that is to say, the number of puffs given by a railway engine daring its journey — depends upon the circum ference of its driving wheels and their speed. No matter what, the rate of speed may be, for every one round of the driving wheels a loco motive will give four puffs — two out of each cylinder, the cylinders being double. The sizes of driving wheels vary in circumference, although they are generally made of about twenty feet. The express speed varies from fifty-four to fifty-eight miles an hour. Taking the average circumference of the driving wheel to be twenty feet and the speed per hour fifty miles, a locomotive will give, going at express speed, 880 puffs per minute, 52,800 puffs per hour, and 1,056 puffs per mile.

Publication Title: Lockhart Review And Oaklands Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PAVEMENTS OF IRON SHAVINGS. [Newspaper Article] — The Lockhart Review and Oaklands Advertiser — 13 December 1910

PAVEMENTS OF IRON SHAV INGS. 'A novel French pavement con sists of blocks made by filling moulds with matted iron shavings, and then pouring in cement sufficiently fluid to penetrate the entire mass. The blocks have great strength, resis tance to abrasion, and elasticity un der blows or jarring. Tests have shown a resistance to compression of 150,000 pounds per square inch, and a strength four times as great as that of ordinary cement. It is claimed that joints may be almost eliminated in this paving — an important ad vantage, as this takes away the purts of greatest wear and destruction.

Publication Title: Lockhart Review And Oaklands Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RAISING A FOUR-STOREY BUILDING. [Newspaper Article] — The Lockhart Review and Oaklands Advertiser — 13 December 1910

RAISING A FOUR-STOREY BUILDING. A number of streets in the low level district of Pittsburg have been raised in level by a maximum of 10ft. in order to prevent the risk of flooding from the Allegheny River, to which they had previously been much exposed. In order to comply with the new conditions a few of the buildings were provided with en trances at the first-floor level, the ground floor being converted into a basement, but in the majority of cases the better class of buildings have been raised bodily so as to maintain the level of the ground floor with that of the street, con siderable space being thus obtained underneath for the construction of cellars. A number of buildings were raised from 3ft. to 8ft. with out injury, and one example of this work is illustrated in the 'Engineer- ing Record,' where a four-storey brick factory of about 2232 tons total weight, and measuring 44ft. by 100ft., and 50ft. in height, was raised 8ft. without interfering with business in the upper store...

Publication Title: Lockhart Review And Oaklands Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Wise and Otherwise. [Newspaper Article] — The Lockhart Review and Oaklands Advertiser — 13 December 1910

Wise and Otherwise. Millionnire: 'Well, Count, what is it? You seem to have something im portant to say.' Count: 'I have come to tell you that I have decided to select you for my father-in-law.' ? * ? ? ? 'I suppose.' sighed the minor poet, 'that I'll have to sell this little gem of thought to you for mere gold.' 'Not at all,' answered the editor. 'I'm go ing to give you five shillings for it.' 'Do you think they approved of my sermon?' asked the newly-appointed minister, hopeful that he had made a good impression. 'Yes, I think so,' replied his wife, 'they were all nod* ding.' ? ? ? ? ? He: 'But why did you lead me on to propose, if you had no intention of accepting me?' She: 'Oh, Clara told me how funny you looked when you proposed to her, and I wanted to see for myself.' ? * ? * * Husband: 'Oh, if you could only learn to cook as my first wife did.' : Wife (hotly): 'If you were as smart as my dear first husband was, you'd '?: be rich enough to engage the best _^: cook in the count...

Publication Title: Lockhart Review And Oaklands Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BREACH OF PROMISE. [Newspaper Article] — The Lockhart Review and Oaklands Advertiser — 13 December 1910

BREACH OF PROMISE. There are fewer breach of promise cases in France than in any other country The French law requires the plaintiff to prove in court that she has suffered a pecuniary loss by her fiance's change of mind. Throughout France, a bride almost invariably has a dowry, large or small, and the fact is likely to weaken her case. The sr.me law has been adopted in Austria and Holland, where the number of such cases is proportionately very .-mall. In Germany an elaborate method of announcing the betrothal practically puts an end to all breach of promise cases. As soon as a couple become engaged, the pair visit the'fown hall and declare their willingness to marry, and sign, with witnesses, a series of documents which render a change of niind on the man's part practically out of the question. When either party wishes to. withdraw from this agree ment, the pair again visit the town hall, and additional documents are formally signed, witnessed and sealed. The authorities then deter...

Publication Title: Lockhart Review And Oaklands Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE MARECHAL NEIL ROSE. [Newspaper Article] — The Lockhart Review and Oaklands Advertiser — 13 December 1910

THE MARECHAL NEIL ROSE. When Neil, the French General, was returning from the scene of his victories in the war between France and Austria, he received from a peas ant who wished to honor the hero, a basket of beautiful pale-yellow roses. One of the stems the General took to a florist in Faris, in whose care it re mained until it became a thriving bush covered with blossoms. Neil then took the plant as a gift to the Em press Engenie. She expressed great admiration of the exquisite flowers, and on learning that the rose was nameless said: 'Then I'll name it. It shall be 'The Marechal Neil.' ' At the same time she bestowed upon the astonished general the jewelled baton that betokened his promotion to the high and much-coveted rank of Marshal of France.

Publication Title: Lockhart Review And Oaklands Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PEARLS FROM TREES. [Newspaper Article] — The Lockhart Review and Oaklands Advertiser — 13 December 1910

PEARLS FROM TREES. The fact that cocoanuts sometimes contain pearls — properly so-called, and similar to the pearls of molluscs — has been established. A speciman the size of a pea was exhibited by a gentleman of Boston (Mass.), and its owner explained that such pearlswere worth a good deal of money in th&^Jrial-- ay Peninsula, where the native -ifajahs esteem them highly. These pearls are similar in composition to those of the pearl oyster, being found by chem ical analysis to consist of calcium carbonate and a small amount of or ganic matter. It is altogether a puz zle why the giant seed should produce such' concretions, as they cannot be due to an attempt, as is the case with the mollusc, to cover irritating par ticles.

Publication Title: Lockhart Review And Oaklands Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Lockhart Review and Oaklands Advertiser — 13 December 1910

Whe it Producers. J. Jeremy (Si Co. Agents for ~ JameS Bell and -EO, Wheat Exporters, Will be buying at THE ROCK again this Seasou, and are pre pared to make forward contracts for New Wheat, Store and Advance on the Most Liberal Conditions under the manage ment of Mr. JOHN DULLARD Edmondson SUPPLIES ILverythmg FOB Everybody Everywhere '? ' Owlet's Ukeu at their e-teu&iva StolW; Gurwooil-streef, Wagg*» T. Bdmondoon and Co hftvo been in existence since 18-42, and it la Z. -' -'% wcogttlscd principle that Experience teaches. We know your ? Deeds and have laid ourselves out to supply them at. lowest Wagga ' pricea. It matters not how small or how large the order or gfeafc the' distance we can do the best for yon that can be done. Correspondence Invited. T. Edmondson & ©o., THE STERLING STOREKEEPERS. Gurwood Street, WAGGA. 'PHONE 2. THE ©LO SPHINX On the Egyptian desert is, no doubt, the object of classical study, but our Flour Bins 7' ' (PATENTED) ' Are the Result ot Mod...

Publication Title: Lockhart Review And Oaklands Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW TO MIX RED LEAD PAINT. [Newspaper Article] — The Lockhart Review and Oaklands Advertiser — 13 December 1910

HOW TO MIX RED LEAD PAINT. To mix red lead paint easily and rapidly use a revolving barrel butter churn. It is well known that red lead is a most stubborn pigment and hard to mix with hand paddles. By using the barrel churn to mix the paint an old painter will be sur prised ab the increased spreading qualities of the paint so mixed over that mixed with hand paddles.

Publication Title: Lockhart Review And Oaklands Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Science Notes & News. WHERE SHIPS SINK. [Newspaper Article] — The Lockhart Review and Oaklands Advertiser — 13 December 1910

Science Notes & News. WHERE SHIPS SINK. In view of the .difficulty often— and even recently — experienced of locating wrecks, the invention of Mr. Charles Taplin promises to be exceedingly useful. It consists of a buoy which releases itself when the vessel sinks and immediately floats above it on the surface of the water.

Publication Title: Lockhart Review And Oaklands Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN AUTOMATIC DOCTOR. [Newspaper Article] — The Lockhart Review and Oaklands Advertiser — 13 December 1910

AN AUTOMATIC DOCTOR. An American farmer has carried the automatic idea to an extreme length. Every one knows how cattle rub against a post or a hedge for re lief from irritation; this observant and ingenious farmer has erected several posts containing a reservoir in the hollowed upper portion of the post, and covered with a perforated casing of tough fabric. Between the post and the covering is a tilling of some yielding material. The animals rub themselves against these posts, the covering yields, and some reliev ing mixture is pressed out and on to the irritating part. It may be oil or insecticide.

Publication Title: Lockhart Review And Oaklands Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NEWSPAPERS FROM SLOT MACHINES. [Newspaper Article] — The Lockhart Review and Oaklands Advertiser — 13 December 1910

NEWSPAPERS FROM SLOT MACHINES. A New York printer has invented a-coin-in-the-slot machine to sell newspapers. - The device has a capa city of forty to a hundred newspapers through the glass front. The pages, exhibits the upper half of the news paper through the glass front. The coin-operating mechanism may be changed to vend one cent, two cent, three cent, or Jive cent papers by merely withdrawing a pin from one hole and inserting it in another. When set for a five-cent paper, either a riickel or five pennies may be used.

Publication Title: Lockhart Review And Oaklands Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HEATING TWENTY-SEVEN MILES OF ORCHARDS. [Newspaper Article] — The Lockhart Review and Oaklands Advertiser — 13 December 1910

HEATING TWENTY-SEVEN MILES OF ORCHARDS. One of the greatest feats of arti ficial outdoor heating ever attempt ed was resorted to by some fruit growers in Colorado to save a crop of fruit estimated at £600,000 in value. Thousands upon thousands of smudge-pots were scattered through the orchard over twenty seven miles of territory, and the raising of temperature that resulted effectually dispelled the unexpected frost., The smudge-pots used were of many different types, some burn ing oil, and others coal. The tem perature in the orchards was actual ly raised 8deg. and 9deg. over the entire twenty-seven miles of terri tory, as many as 300,000 smudge pots being used..

Publication Title: Lockhart Review And Oaklands Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LONG LIVED TREES. [Newspaper Article] — The Lockhart Review and Oaklands Advertiser — 13 December 1910

LONG LIVED TREES. Olive trees are known to live for hundreds of years. A grove of the trees, according to history, was planted 450 years ago, and the trees are still bearing olives, although they look very aged. The fruit on the trees is still in abundance and is of very fine quality. The method of grinding the olives for oil and picking the fruit is peculiar. Nei ther the grinders nor pickers receive any wages, but they are paid on a percentage- The pickers receive about ('« per cent, of the fruit picked aud the grinders get about 10 per cent. The workmen then dispose of their percentage in the same way as their employers. t

Publication Title: Lockhart Review And Oaklands Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RELIGIOUS BODIES IN LONDON. [Newspaper Article] — The Lockhart Review and Oaklands Advertiser — 13 December 1910

RELIGIOUS BODIES IN LON DON. London enjoys the distinction of having at least forty-five different denominations of Christians, while Glasgow boasts its .thirty-four reli gious bodies, and .-,- Edinburgh its twenty-five. In spite of the Metho dist Union, there are still five or six varieties of Methodist societies in London, xwhile there are two other 'reformed' offshoots from the Church of England, three different Baptist bodies, and three kinds of Presbyterians — English, Scotch, and Welsh.

Publication Title: Lockhart Review And Oaklands Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE DEAD SEA. [Newspaper Article] — The Lockhart Review and Oaklands Advertiser — 13 December 1910

THE DEAD SEA. This remarkable lake, forty-six miles long and from five to nine miles wide, is situated in the south/ east of Palestine, and known froni the time of Jerome (340-420 A.D.) as the 'Dead' Sea, because no fish of any kind have ever been found in its waters. Its surface, which is lower than that of any other body of water known, is 1,292ft. below the level of the Mediterranean. At its northern end it has a depth of about .r, 300ft., while the water at its southern extremity is only from . 3ft. to 12ft. deep. The Dead Sea is fed by the Jordan from the north, but has no outlet, the water being ap parently carried off by evaporation. The water of the Dead Sea contains a large amount of the salts of mag nesia and soda ; as a consequence of its specific. gravity is. high, and bathers float in it with ease. The popular notions that the Dead Sea exhales noxious vapours, and that birds cannot fly over its surface and remain unharmed, are not founded on fact.

Publication Title: Lockhart Review And Oaklands Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
INSECT DESTROYING LAMP. [Newspaper Article] — The Lockhart Review and Oaklands Advertiser — 13 December 1910

INSECT DESTROYING LAMP. Figure shows a lamp device for the destruction of insects -that fly at night. Combined in the device are a base pan, a lamp, a shade and a cylindrical cage loosely* disposed up on the shade. The cylindrical cage, which is shown directly above the chimney, has a screen covering its upper end. The insects, attracted by the light, fly under the lamp shade, and are caught in the cage and burned; .

Publication Title: Lockhart Review And Oaklands Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE LIGHTER SIDE OF ASTRONOMY. [Newspaper Article] — The Lockhart Review and Oaklands Advertiser — 13 December 1910

THE LIGHTER SIDE OF ASTRONOMY. It (is a well-known fact — and may have a physiological basis— that most people regard the moon as being about 1ft. in diameter. /That these popular measurementn tend to mislead, and are not the best means of dealing with celestiai dimensions, the following dialogue would indicate:-^- H Mrs. S— :'Uy the way, I hear Jupiter, the evening star, is worth seeing just now. Can either of you girls tell me where to look for it?' Bertha: 'Yes, I can- It's ex actly 2£ yards to the right of the Great Bear.' Mrs. B — : 'Two yards and a half! What on earth do you mean 1' Bertha: 'Well, I've measured it carefully with my umbrella.' Parents, as well as teachers, have sometimes to run the gauntlet of awkward questions. 'Father,' said little Tommy one day, 'what is an equinox?' Father: 'Why — er — it — is — ' ahem ! For goodness sake, Tommy, don't you know anything about mythology at all? An equinox was a fabled animal — half horse, half cow. Its name is derived from t...

Publication Title: Lockhart Review And Oaklands Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MATTERS FEMININE COLUMNS. Honsehold Hints. [Newspaper Article] — The Lockhart Review and Oaklands Advertiser — 13 December 1910

MATTERS FEMININE COLUMNS. ^ ? . ? ? ___^ ? . ? Household Hints. After eating onions drink a cup of strong coffee, and the breath wilf be cured. . . . Mud splashes on trousers or skirts are safely scraped off with the edge of a penny. A lump of sugar put in the teapot will prevent tea staining damask, however fine, over which it may be spilled. To sweeten sour cream put it in to a basin with the juice of a lemon and a tablespoon ful of castor sugar; and whip until stiff. This will be. quite sweet and increase the quan tity. To' repair damask table linen, cut one inch off one side and one inch off one end, then re-hem. This will bring the creases into different plac es, and so give new life to the cloth. To keep butter cool place it on a farge soup plate with a clean gar den flower pot over it, and place a wet cloth, on the latter, allowing the corners of the cloth to rest, on ,the plate. The cloth must be kept damp. A cement floor should be swept, then rubbed with a dry bath-brick, w...

Publication Title: Lockhart Review And Oaklands Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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