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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

""T" THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. U honor. Wo do not exalt her one vir tue, one privilege, but all her virtues and all her privileges. It is not a spe cial devotion of one place, one nation it is a devotion of the whole Catholic world. No time of the year sees such a number of her servants at the foot of her altars. It is now that the prayers, sup plications and hymns of her loving chil dren are most delightful to her ear. There is not one of her children whose supplicating voice she does not hear. Let us all, during this month, vie with one another like devoted children in paying homage to the lovely queen of May, our Mother. If until now dor mant, let us awaken our devotion. Let those whose fervor in her service has been constant, increase their zeal for the glory of Mary. Let them rejoice during this month! for Mary will work wonders in their souls Above all, let the sin ner come now to Mary. She longs for his coming back, for his return to the path of virtue from which in weakness he ha...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

w THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ; t i Te Indian dVocatc Ib a Review, published by the Bencdlctino Fathers ol the Indian Territory, to plead the cause 6f the last remnants of the Indian tribes, and to give a history of their progress toward civilization. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of each tribe; their progress in education and religion; their occupa tions, industries, schools, etc., etc. Also, a history of our mis sions, statistics, and other interesting matter that can not be found in any other publication. The proceeds of this Review will be used for educating and converting the Indians of the Territory. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, Sacred Heart P. 0 , Okla. Ter. ArrnovEi) by Right Rev. TIIEO. MEERSCIIAERT, Vicau ArosTonc of Oklahoma and Indian Temutouy. Subscripltons 60 Cents per Year. Single Copies 15 Cents. APRIL, 1896. EDITORIAL AND LOCAL. It will cost something to be religious; it will cost more not to be though. There is nowhere an apology for de spondency. Always t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

'''" T' m--1 ZJjfr- ''('v T f' TB"jG7 INDIAN ADVOCATE. W C-4 i v our lips. Some persons who part with the hope of meeting soon, say "Sans Adieu," wishing to express the hope that no accident may prevent their meeting on earth before their final reunion in the bosom of God. This is an admirable thought, but it is prefer able to unite the two wishes in a single formula, saying: "Au rovoir et adieu." According to the beliefs of the Ari zona Indians, the cliff-dwellers built along the cliffs because they feared an other deluge. We received the following letter: 585 Greene Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y., January 27, 1890. J Dear Friend The education of mis sionaries for the Leper Settlement, as well as for the other Missions of Oceania, is mainly carried on in Belgium. An important college is there, not far from Father Damien's native village of Tre meloo. As a knowledge of English is essential for the success of their work, especially for the Sandwich Islands, the Fathers, having no facilities i...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

"As' ,;f 'f'SC,7-,'.k"7-' u TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ?tt W We read that recently a lady had several hundred dollars' worth of point lace clipped off her clothing by an adroit thief while she was at church singing "Strip me of the robe of pride, clothe me with humilty." A remarkable article appears in Harper's Weekly. It has for a title "The Unique Plight of the Five Na tions." It is from the pen of Mr. Julian Ralph. From it these sentences are extracted: "For two years a United States court of inquiry, called the Dawes Commission, has been spending a large part of the time in the Indian Territory, looking into the conditions that obtain there. From the very out set it has been one-sided, of one mind, bent upon the absorption of the red men's property by the whites. It has exploited the argument of those who desire the change, regardless of our treaty obligations, and it has aspersed the motives and testimony of those who are jealous of our national honor as those of men who are profitin...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

ETffTT'ET .'ggaFirT!7?gW?'y 'J Ty?f?'7T" JWr7WW''TffiH"'9WWf,'W'Vl!r " "TS'F'?!- fHE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 4.6 serious. The selfish, sordid, cross, ill tempered, pitiful little soul! His de voted wife dare not ask him for a dollar. She would rather have a tooth pulled any time. He is always grumbling. He is a chronic growler. Ho thinks the world was made for him, and won ders it was not made bigger on his account. Husbands and wives, quit scolding each other. Be kind, be pa tient, be forgiving. Praise each other. A loving word goes a long way. It always roaches the center of the heart, and will be treasured forever. Try it! "Convince a man against his will He'll hold the same opinion still " Wealth is power; talent is power, and knowledge is power. But there is a mightier force in the world than any of these a power which wealth is not rich enough to purchase, nor talent strong enough to overcome, nor knowl edge wise enough to overreach; all these tremble in its presence. It is Truth the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

16 TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. A young man living in southern Texas shipped to his brother in Okla homa Territory, as Christmas present, a choice donkey of the diminutive species, known as the Mexican burro. The agent in making out his manifest, concluded that "burro'' meant "bureau" and reported accordingly to his su perior: "One bureau missing, and one jackass over." There is in the countries of the East a species of black ants that suddenly attack articles of furniture. Their work is insidious and unseen. Exter nally all seems right, until suddenly the whole thing collapses in a cloud of dust. So it is where discord and harsh ness exist in domestic or community life. It will eat out the very life of home. Heaven is transformed to hell. The angelhood of earth is exchanged for demoniacal sorrow and sin. It al ways takes an angel to make a devil. That which is most beautiful is made most hideous by unworthy transition. Let us remember, friends, that from the apples of discord is expressed ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

UUlMIMftl TEE INDIAN ADVOGATH. 4-7 Prince Bismarck is fond of asking questions, but does not like to answer them. On one occasion, says the Lon don Million, the ox-Chancellor called in a young physician who, indifferent to his patient's rank and prestige, coolly pro ceeded to put him through an exhaus tive professional examination. Bis marck became impatient, and finally declared he would not answer another question. "Very well," calmly replied the doctor, "if you do not want to be questioned you had better send for a veterinary. He is accustomed to treat his patients without requiring answers from them to any questions." The au dacity of the young doctor caused the ex-Iron Chancellor to remain dumb for a moment; then he grimly said: "If you are as skillful as you are imperti nent, young man, you must be a great physician." How many upstarts, im putent in the extreme, may not take an object lesson from the above that is, if they have brains enough to catch the hint. The missions in ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

18 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. The present congress has refused to grant any more assistance to the Cath olic Indian schools. The spirit of secularism has prevailed and the Indian schools are thrown entirely upon the charity of the faithful. Bigotry and secularism are always a powerful com bination and have succeeded in depriv ing the Indian of the only successful means of lifting him out of the deep ening slough of barbarous decay in which this government has perpetually kept him. The number of children affected by the action of congress is stated as four thousand, and many of these will now receive no education at all, as it appeared in the debate that the bill did not carry an appropriation suffi cient to construct school houses for these children, and from a letter of the Indian commissioner, read by one of the members, it was shown that the necessary accommodations for the chil dren could not be constructed before the time they would be needed. Are these Indian children to grow up hea...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

-flTt ?vrr nYrpril'f r?5r- "" J t r-v - .7- " .TJTTTnV Ti? INDIAN ADVOCATE. x raWk 7M0j&r - R'TRsk 2r,4NkLa iua ia HBfe. WTl , fin nF jr "-" '- "" mtfie HBSe Step sokwarMsunsfiine. ater flyiareriijjiija. w rjoceofarmcfbircLp' les with tneehitareninqin S5SS & . ) mtomto 0 Ifjee I he -praise; K Tfjeliliej ijovy wfjiteyje fjiije out toqwe tfie jVfy tfy cfilare)5 fteart be always l'ToTfiee Te priijp "' ..v vrt -LR 0qpi5 a$tep, 1B96 GRCCiGf from SHE IRJJICII PVOSCliC- 4.9 M l -y jLLa.u.M AtoJU-.lA. .&--.., Vtj? .-.&.J. - .,c j-- ,

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

rpr -yf 72y ftjjK " 50 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. WE ARE NOT MISSED. If you or I, To-day should die, The birda would sing the same to-morrow, The vernal spring Her floweis would bring, And few would think of us with sorrow. Yes, he is dead, Would then be said, The corn would floss, the gray grass hay, The cattle low, And summer go, And few would heed us pass away. How soon we pass ! How few, alas ! Keniember those who turn to mold ; Whose faces fade With autumn's shade Beneath the sodden churchyard cold ! Yes, it is so We come and go! They hail our birth, they mourn us dead ; A day or more, The winter o'er, Another takes our place instead. INDIFFERENCE. So many ridiculous things are said about the Church and so many false hoods afloat concerning her doctrines that it is absolutely necessary for our young people to make their religion a special study. The dazzling sophisms of Spencer and others are brought up before us in triumph, and among our people who mingle in everyday life, few are f...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

r"n '""v-r i'y' 'vrt'"1 ui-rg" ' j-j "TJIff -iw',; r a. i'WHy-W"? V i-v-' l W. J.ilJ'1 u tJIMH STilE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 51 "V, rejection of the Christian doctrine is not frequent, and wo are roceiving among us some of the most brilliant minds in the world ! but still, indiffer ence is very common that cold indif ference or senseless pride which forbids man to bend his knee before the God who created him ; which makes him ashamed to acknowledge his faults, and bids him pamper his weak and sinful flesh. Oh, fathers and mothers, look to it that your sons are not growing up to scoff at your cherished faith and mock the Saviour of the world. Be not content that they work and study well. There is that within every human being which needs guidance, else it will go astray ; that inherent weakness towards evil which comes with life and clings to us through all our days. Look out for this indiflerence ; this careless ness about complying with religious duties ; this putting off from day to day ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

52 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. spirit of the thing, or from whoso irri tation they could save themselves by flight. The day had been a soft and balmy one. like to a rose which autumn had let fall from the wreath he had stolen from the brow of summer one in which hearts "weary with dragging the crosses too heavy for mortals to bear" are content to live, in which existence is a pure joy in itself. And now this day so calm, so bright, was dying with a gentle soughing of the wind which, however, to the common-sense mortal, and one versed in the science of the upper air, betokened a storm in the near future. But the boys and girls were having their own fun outside. With in, in the dimly lighted recesses of a temple raised for the worship of God, upon whose altar the Prisoner of the Tabernacle dwelt continuously, there were groups of men and women kneel ing around the confessionals, in solemn and silent preparation for the glorious feast with which the Mighty Mother ushers in the month of the Ho...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

r-"i-(p" f J "VT;w"v ' r?n. ,r-v r-TrrptifrMf P'W'Tf''PW f; yvvr ' Byyi tq twiiHifiu.vm'fi' THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 58 in the confessional. The young man had knelt very close to her as she passed out so close that her veil caught against his coat-sleeve and brushed his face; or was it an accident? Did not, rather, a swift upward motion of his hand bring the fold of crape against his lips? Twenty minutes afterwards the same youth for he was but a boy knelt be hind Mrs. Deland, a little removed, and fixed his gaze upon the face of the pic tured Madonna above the altar. Then when the lady rose he bent his close-cut curls down so that no feature of his face was visible. She glanced at him and passed on. But something in the kneel ing figure brought back a memory and a constriction of the heart, to which she pressed her hand, as she went down the aisle without a backward look. With quiet footfall the stranger followed her followed until he stood almost touch ing her while she entered her ca...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

rif. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. K ft Mr or ought to bo, a Catholic. Of course as soon as he recovered consciousness he was asked to see a priest. This he refused to do, and the point was not pressed, but he did not recover, in fact, was for several days looking death very closely in the face. When his sufferings became very intense, the Sister who had the care of him would say quietly : " Bear it with patience for the sake of the suffering souls." At first the reiteration of the words irrit ited him and he swore at her under his breath. But at length grown des perate, he told her that if she would promise him not to repeat them, he would try and think of the souls in Purgatory. " But you must think of them pity ingly, and offer your pain with all your heart to the dear Lord for them!" was the parting shaft of the brave woman. He did so, the old training of his college days coming back to him, not only once, but several times, and each time with greater earnestness, and was surprised at th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

irJ 'r--f "" r ' - ' - r "' - ""- . '" r p C W f T-f '-y v4 y ? Hf " '""V'WM 'mijnyi.Bri ''" 'PiiMr M -ti.i. 'i.'.i-- ly ' ! jjy f1 W VMMyyyi m mnMy THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 56 broad land, saved to us in the hour of its deepest gloom, helplessness and de spondency by the sublime and costly attitude of France, know that hers alone was not a moral support, but that the advent of her succoring army and navy on our shores was prefaced by a gift as royal as the hearts that sent it to our barren treasury and starving troops? When it seemed to the bravest, the firmest, the most undaunted sup porters of the constitution that the death knell of liberty was ringing ; when the gaunt, freezing heroes at Valley Forge were dragging their shoeless, bleeding feet over the snow, and when the loyal tortured heart of Washington was almost breaking, a cry of love and en couragement' swept across the Atlantic, and burst of sunlight succeeded the heavy clouds that had boon crushing down men's souls ; for wit...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

66 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. THE PATRONAGE OF ST. PATRICK. A 11EMINISENCE OP THE CIVIL WAR. Flushed with the glow of victory after the surrender of Fort Donelson, the Union troops marched on to new fields. But the life-blood of many a brave soldier lent its color to the triumph ; and for weeks after, Death was busy in the military hospitals, where each dawn and each sunset claimed fresh victims. Thirty years have passed since then, and yet there are heart-memories which renew them selves as anniversaries occur. One of these, as related by an eye-witness, seems especially appropriate to St. Patrick's Day ; for it marks a spiritual favor obtained through the intercession of Ireland's patron saint. Toward the close of February, 1862, a young soldier was brought to the military hospital at Mound City, 111., which was in charge of the Sisters of the Holy Cross, and which at that same time contained about eight hundred patients. He was suffering from a slight wound, and a low fever brought on ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 57 miration at the graceful hangings, she passed into the next room. The idea of giving St. Patrick charge of the patients seemed to Sistor a very good one ; so as soon as she was free she went to the chapel, where she offered fervent petitions to the great apostle of Ireland ; and, as she herself relates, she told him he was to be re sponsible for every patient in the ward, that he was to see that no Catholic died without the Sacraments, and that none should die unbaptized. Then, after recommending Ireland, the land of her birth, and America, the land of her adoption, to his intercession, she returned to what was now St. Patrick's own ward. The following day Sister spoke of removing the decora tions ; but as the soldiers begged her to leave them a little longer, she said, smiling at their eagerness : " Well, we will celebrate St. Patrick's day with an octave." The fever was slowly but surely con suming the vitality of " our George," as the men now called him ; ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

4-tapPfw iw w n -sv - ? v-o r mp7 J iHHHBMMHHiaBMMHMHI s TtfJS? INDIAN ADVOCATE. TMe Apgcl ofpargatory. HOW MANY SWEET KEMIN1SCENCK8 THI8 TITLE RECALLS TO A CHRISTIAN MIND. SAINT JOSEPH. The Church celebrates annually throe feasts in honor of St. Joseph. First, his principal feast day as Patron of the Universal Church, on the 19th of March ; then the third Sunday after Easter, which is dedicated to his Patronage; finally the 23d of January, in com memoration of his espousal to theBl. V. Mary. Among all the re markable features of the person, po sition and charac ter of this saint, one is of particular interest to us, viz: the universality of his intercession and patronage. St. Theresa writes on this point : "It seems that to other saints the Lord has given power to suc cor us in only one kind of necessity; but this glorious saint, I know, by my experience, as sists us in all kinds of necessities; hence our Lord, it appears, wishes us to un derstand that as He was obedient to him whe...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

rp.TT"?''''rr"pr'5 tt "-Ty Tv; ijtywg?rVTr" rfprZ THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 69 duce labor clascos and labor unions to elect St. Joseph their patron, to have recourse to his mediation and to study and imitate his life, a great social prob lem might find an easy and speedy so lution. It may appear singular that the posi tion of St. Joseph whilst on earth should make him no less properly the 'patron of students and devotees of science, than of laborers and humble artisans. But wo have only to remember that he was appointed tutor and guide and constant companion to the eternal, infinite, per sonal Wisdom of God Himself. Would that we might ever be so near the foun tain of all knowledge and wisdom! People living in the world justly count St. Joseph their own, as he lived a long life in the world, among the people of the world, and was obliged to take an active interest even in the political for tunes of his time. "Hearing that Arch elaus reigned in Judea, in the room of Herod, he retired into...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

60 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Christ had completed His redemption, and thus realized in person the keen ness of that suffering, which is the greatest among all the sufferings of purgatory. Let us then connect with our devo tion to St. Joseph the devotion for the holy souls. If we will not make inter cession for the souls in Purgatory the main burden of our prayers to St. Jo seph, let us at least make it a kind of side issue, and always include them in our prayers. This great and powerful saint will, at our request, obtain the relief of many souls from purgatory, and thus prove to the last extent the universality of his intercession and patronage. THE SOULS IN PURGATORY. 0 deareBt Lord, we humbly crave Thy mercy for the holy dead, Who suffer in the burning wave The rigors of Thy justice dread. 0 Jesus, unto our request In pity let Thy Heart incline! And grant them, Lord, eternal rest Let light for ever on them shine. Behold how patiently they bear The flames that cleanse, the pangs that th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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