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Elephind.com contains 1,630 items from Great Falls Tribune, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 13 November 1886

GREAT FALLS, MONTANA . GREAT FALLS is located atthe Falls of the Missouri which furnish the greatest available water power on the Continent. Is within seven miles of the most extensive COAL and IRON district in the West, immediately beyond which are rich GOLD, SILVER and COPPER districts. It lays tributary the best agricultural and grazing part of: the Territory, and the pineries of the Upper Missouri and tributaries. It is especially adapted by its natural resources and geographical position to become the leading MANUFACTURING CITY between Minneapolis and the Pacific, and the principal RAILROAD CENTER of Montana. The trip to Great Falls will amply repay tourists by the beauty of the scenery on the way, and they will find here the most magnificent series of waterfalls in the worldf while the surrounding country is rich in picturesqe scenery. For further information address H. O. H O WE N, Agent. SPRAY OF THE FALLS. I C. P. Thomson has returned from Ben 2011; Read "Hidden Treasures" ...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 20 November 1886

L REAT FALLS TRIBUNE. VOL, 2, GREAT FALLS, MONTANA TERRITORY, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1886, NO 27 A TENDER EPISTLE. Extract From a Tenderfoot's Letter to the Old Folks at Home. GREAT FALLS, Nov. 10, 1886 DEAR A-: Your letter etc. Our hot weather is over now and it has become nice and cool. I am doing well here. 3My land will cost me about $600. When the railroad gets here it will be worth at least $2,000. I have been living in another man's shack for some time; but when he came bac- I had to move out to the stable and bunk with my cayuse, until a young English man, who has taken up a ranch near me, kindly invited me to live with him. I thought if I bunked in with him I could lie in bed mornings a.l take a snoonze while he got breakf't. tand did house work generally. But as minds of grnat men perambuli'te the same meandering streams, Johnnie Bull had the same idea. So, as we lay in bed the first morning the clock struck seven and finally the hands reproachfully pointed to 7:30. But st...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 20 November 1886

WASHINGTON LETTER. .From Our Regular Correspondent. WASHINGTON, NOV. 7, 1886. 1 The result of the election illustrated the old Italian apothegm, "It is the unexpect ed that happens." There is a telegraph office inthe White House and on election nights it is a busy place. Usually on such occasions a large corps or messenger boys are also kept busy carrying messages from other lines, besides the Western Union to the White Hlouse. Everything had been put in oruer for last Tuesday night and the President sat for several hours in Col. Lamont's w room, next to the little office, and got the 01 news direct from all parts of the country. His greatest interest was in the New York elections, and Mr. Hewitt'syplurality I was a matter of considerable congratula tion. The democratic losses among con gressmen in New York were, of course, unwelcome, but were not unexpected from P several districts. Finally the president re tired and left Col. Lamont to struggle withf the returns for the balance of...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 20 November 1886

Girls Who Counted Seven Stars. Two western girls having heard that if any.ne counted seven stars on seven con secutive nights, and on the seventh night also had a dream, the dream would surely -"come to pass," were perplexed and hor rified on comparing notes after the obser vance and occurrence of everything pre cisely in accordance with the rule to learn that one of them was to be married to the Emperor of New Jersey, and that the oth er was to be made into wine jelley for a picnic and run into moulds representing Bunker Hill Monument and the Central Park Obelisk.-Ilaper's IWeekly. Base Scheme of Designing Husbands. The other day as two well-known citi zens were standing together in the corridor of the postoffice one happened to notice that a postal card held in the lingers of the other was directed to the holder. " \Why, how does this come?" was asked. "l)o you write letters to yourself?" 'In tils ca:se' yes," was the answer. "That's funny. "Well, not so ver'y. See the other side....

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 20 November 1886

GREAT FALLS TrIBUNE. .--- l ._ ,_ , - - p1 WEEKLY TRIBUNE, re MAYD Y 5Ar SA'DAY T rel TIE TIUBIIE PUBLISHIN COCMAT, di AM IfflRIMINO BATES WULNISHED ON AP PLICATION. SUBSCRIPTION RATES nesepy 1 year, (in advance) ...............$3.00 fr' O(esopy maonths,..................... 1.50 br One copy mnonths......... ............ 1.00 peiman *pi............... .......... 10 J JAtrietly in advance. in lie s.calaon of the Tarsus in Northern Mestnaoi hi guaesnteed to exesod that of any pa- is pas ablished in the territory. & .sbecrLers d.eiring their address changed mast send Mtir former address; this shonuld be il semembeeed. Address, Tautnun PusuL-mo Co. B er SATURDAY, NOV. 20, 188l6. S Thanksgiving Proclamation. WASIHINGTON, Nov. 1st.-The following s is Cleveland's proclamation, designating i Thursday, November 25th, as the day of at thanksgiving and prayer: A PROCLAMATION BY TUE I'RESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES. ýi It has long been the custom of the peo- lii pie of the United States, on ...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 20 November 1886

RIPPLE OF THE RAPIDS. Thos. Healey has returned from Benton. Thede Gibson has gone to Minnesota to spend a couple of months. Calt. T. P. Fuller has disposed of his t Butte interests and will remove here. E. R. Clingan was over from Belt one day this week. He has entirely recovered from the effects of the gun shot wound re ceived some weeks ago. We have learned that the family of Mr. Louis Sorrick did not go to Iiighwood with him. Mrs. Sorrick is staying with Mrs. Tolbert where they have neat and commodious dress-making parlors opposite 1)ickinson & Dupont's. Dr. Fairfield ha; returned from Benton after an absence of over two months. We are glad to welcome the genial Dr. home again, but we dton't see how he is going to pull through the nmext two years without that coronetr's salary of os :ti'-dve cents per annum. Rlev. John RHI: and others are canvasing - the subject of establishing a free library and reading-room in treat Falls, with the idea of ultimately having a coffee house ...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 20 November 1886

GREAT FALLS TRIBUNE. 8 BUILDING. t t To the Tribune: After all is made correct, the partitions may be bridged. This is often done by nailing in short horizontal pieces between the studs, a process which has its use, but is-Qva- u-ees.s for tlhapresentpurpose. The i proper way is to cut in diagonal pieces, which present considerable resistance to the sagging of the partition. The final operation will be to try the partitions on each side with a straight edge, and correct the crooked studs by sawing half through them on the cancave side, forcing them into place and driving wedges into the in cisions. The chimneys are next enclosed with funing, consisting of a cage of studs, supported by posts at the angles of the breast. These funings should be meas ured to see that they are accurately placed in the room and that they are of the pro per dimensions; such details being little regarded by the average framer. No thing now remains but the fixing of the grounds to lprepare the inside of the...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 20 November 1886

llddffn Treasures A TALE OF CALIFORNIA. Written for the Tribune by Y. H. TIIS. CHAPTER I AN OLD ACQUAINTANCE. One evening in July, 187-, found me -after a dusty and hot stage ride of forty eight miles, seated in a big, comfortable arm chair on the broad veranda of the El dorado hotel, in J- , one of the many mining towns of California. Its pristine glory of rich placers had departed years ago, but still in the language of one of the old tim ers, "She's no slouch today, you bet bar keep!" Quite a group of rich gold quartz mines wero and are still in operation not far from the town, and gravel claims about that vicinity were yielding the "yellow stuff" in good, paying quantities. The evening was deliciously mild and pleas- ' tmit, but in this respect was no exception to others, for in that locality, though, some times it may be scorching in summer days, the nights are sweetly cool and balmy. i The town though it was spoken of as a i mountain town is not such in reality, as re gards it...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 20 November 1886

GREAT FALLS, MONTANA . GREAT FALLS is located at the Falls of the Missouri which furnish the greatest available water power on the Continent. Is within seven miles of the most extensive COAL and IRON district in the West, immediately beyond which are rich GOLD, SILVER and COPPER districts. It lays tributary the best agricultural and grazing part of the Territory, and the pineries of the Upper Missouri and tributaries. It is especially adapted by its natural resources and geographical position to become the leading: MANUFACTURING CITY between Minneapolis and the Pacific, and the principal RAILROAD CENTER of Montana. The trip to Great Falls will amply repay tourists by the beauty of the scenery on the way, and they will find here the most magnificent series of waterfalls in the world, while the surrounding country is rich in picturesqe scenery. For further informatlon address H. O. CH OWE N, Agent. - ---- I SPRAY OF THE FALLS. James Taylor is in town. Dr. Ladd's children are well agai...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 27 November 1886

VOL, 2, GREAT FALLS, MONTANA TERRITORY, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 27, I886, NO 28 TICKLING TOUCHES. Historian Quackenboss charges Wash ington with the sin of eating green peas with his knife.--Excrhange. Great men frequently are possessed of glaring eccentricities. Ordinary folks would doubtless eat them with their mouths. Adelini Patti will sail from Queens land for New York shortlv.--E.recItge. .Don't say whether she will be ship, schooner or yacht rigged, nor what's the matter with the trans-Atlantic steamship lines. "Lefftinnant Him, ownar ov thi Galetea. iz an Oirishman, whooze fa-ather iz an Oirish County Court .udge. Ilisirizidence iz in Paradise," read our Italian friend McSweegan, from an exchange three weeks old. "(Oi was remalrkin' to thi stoore-kaper nixt dure, that the Hoiberni anrs are a race av thi greatist antekuity. and allo siuggists to me moind, that the fayinalc ripri-intitives av th' domistic cal lynaichun fowl wuz privilig'd carrakthers in th' gyardin of Aedin." tie t...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 27 November 1886

She sighed for Pet Names. m Mrs. Dusenberry (sobbingly)--Oh, its t" enough to break my heart to hear such cc language! It's the way with the men, h however. You used to call me meadow rc daisy, sweet violet, lily of the valley- h' Mr. Dusenberry-Oh, yes, I remember it -you were a whole boquet then! You a' didn't lecture me every night and make such a fuss about my going to lodge. I al called you flower names, didn't I? I now Hl wish you were a "four o'clock," for they ci say that shuts up) sometimes.--Philadel- II plia Cali. b A Tooth for a Tooth. si Cincinnati E.nquirer: Mr. James Tru- ti ett of Ilarris county had a tooth that gave ti him a .ireat deal of annoyance. lie dis- n liked to have it pulled, because his mouth o would be disfigured. On the suggestion ti of a dentist in this city, he gave another b man $15 for one of his teeth. DI)r. Chap- t; pell of La Grange pulled the tooth and then pulled Mr. Truett's tooth, fitted the other tooth that he had just drawn in Mr. Truett's ...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 27 November 1886

NYE ON HIS TRAVELS. *-le Describes "a Hostelry talletl the Fifth Avenue Hotel. I am writing this at an imitation hoeI where the roads fork. I will call iTt the Fifth Avenue hotel because the hotel at a railroad junction is generally called the Fifth Avenue, or the Gem City house, or the Palace hotel. I stopped at an inn some years since called the Palace, and I can truly say that if it had ever been a palace it was very much run down when I visited it. Just as the fond parent of a white-eyed, two-legged fro ak of nature loves to name his mentally c son Napoleon, andjfor the same r.- .t a prominent horse owner in 111. ,t year socked my name en a tall, buck-skin colored colt that did not resemble me, intellectually or physic ially. a colt that did not know enough to go around a barbed wire fence but sought to sift himself through it into an untimely grave, so this man:u has named his sway backed wigwam the Ffth Avenue hotel. It is difier nt from the Fifth Avenue in many ways. In the f...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 27 November 1886

GREAT FALLS TFtIBUNE. WEEKLY TRIBUNE, 7'.i.c i S amirY 5 DAYT DY Tý TIIBU}I PUBLISHIEý COMPANY, D1)VE1ffhIhG RATES BURNISHED ON A' PLICA'.ON. SUBSCRIPTIO'N RATES Onetopy 1 year, (i advanc.) ...............$3.00 (Oe.opy mnts.......................I..4J O a copy 3 monis...... ................ 10 Sp oia..a e isa ........................... . . 10 tioilj ix drvnise. 'Bie ic untl [on of the TaEIaUE in Northern 1Mýoana in guar~ntecd to exesad that of any pa pa published in tSe trilory. SitccrLers dsidring their address changed mat send fi~tr for-.nr addrss.; this should be anmem*berod. Add&eiz, TIIrnUME PuBLsuur Co. SATURDAY, NOV. 27, 1886. MICHAEL DAVIrT, the Irish patriot, chooses a California lady for the life partner of his joys. THE erratic Bob Ingeraoll is rapidly coming to the front as the political leader of the laboring-men. As eastern fashion journal says tall girls a e the fashion now. Well, hic here's hic to the tall girl. hic. The strike at the Chicago stock yards was abo...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 27 November 1886

IMPPLE OF THE RAPIDS. W. P. Wren is out of town this week. Colin Napier has returned from Helena. I See Thomson's new winter stock of dry .goods. tf. r A large number of miners have been sent out to the C:aulee to work the mines. s For Rent. A business room on Central Ave. will be for rent after September 15th. Apply - -to Geo. E. ilHuy. ft Coal ! Coal! Leave orders for your winters coal at thills office. Order eark in order to be pre pared for the cold weather. (CEO. BUDINGTON. C Printing Material for Sale. One good 7.eolnmn Washington hand press, one eight-medium Paragon jobber, a quantity of body type, etc. TitunEs COt'PAN .T, tf Great Falls, SUMMONS. Territory of Montana, Chloteau County. In Justice Court (Great Falls Township, a Itefore (Geo. E. iny. J. P. i WILL HANKS, P f Platintiff. C vEsscs S-SUM MONS C FRANK S. HYDE. B Doenldanut t 7'4h Pe'plt <f 'rh: 1r£'Iri.,ry of .biot,(,n f, send greeting: You are hereby summoned to be and appear before me, Geo. E. Hiuy, a Ju.stice ...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 27 November 1886

GREAT FALLS TRIBUNE. I Sa: The Development of tne House. S4 IWritten fir the TriTu;e: The history of the habitations of man is c co-extensive with the history of the race. y Some would have us go back to arboreal s, man who lived in the branches of the trees v in the same manner as several species of c monkeys do today, but we do not consider } it essential to go beyond that interesting 1 stage of development where the terminal a appendage was lost. It is difficult to trace the development of the house in its first stages. We find e primitive man somei 10,000 years ago dwel- v ling in caves in the earth and living on an s equal basis with the burrowing animals. After ages of this life some great intellect 1 of that day conie'ved the idea of leaning together two flattened bowlders and using them for shelter. This was one great step in the deve!opment. Some time after the cave pleriod the development of tihe houn e I divides into three or four branches accord ing to climate aid natura...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 27 November 1886

Hidden Treasures A TALE OF CALIFORNIA. Written for the Tribune by Y. H. TIJIS. CHAPTER III TIHE CABIN AND THE MAN. Next afternoon while the sun was yet well above the horizon of a clear summer sky, we reached Chase's mill. After the team had been cared for, I was introduc ed by Mac to my future quarters--his cab in. The exterior did not differ very much from several others which were built on the outskirts of the lumber yard, but as future comparisons proved, the interior was furnished and arranged with farmore ta:te and comfort. On the top of a handily contrived desk were piled thirty or forty books, the titles of which plainly indicated that the selec tion had been made with a view to practi cal information and instruction. The civil, criminal and political codes of the state, bound in customary and time-honered calf, made a substantial looking foundation for one of the piles. Sandwiched between HIeoker's Physiology and Blaire's Rhetor ic, peeped out the well worn back of Shakespe...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 27 November 1886

GREAT FALLS, MONTANA . ' GREAT FALLS is located atthe Falls of the Missouri which furnish the greatest available water power on the Continent. Is within seven miles of the most extensive COAL. and IRON district in the West, immediately beyond which are rich GOLD, SILVER and COPPER districts. It lays tributary the best agricultural and grazing part of the Territory, and the pineries of the Upper Missouri and tributaries. It is especially adapted by its natural resources and geographical position to become the leading MANUFACTURING CITY between Minneapolis and the Pacific, and the principal RAILROAD CENTER of Montana. The trip to Great Falls will amply repay tourists' by the beauty of the scenery on the way, and they will find here the most magnificent series of waterfalls in the workL. while the surrounding country is rich in picturesqe scenery. For further information address . H. O. CH O W EN, Agent. - -.-. .- - - - . SPRAY OF THE FALLS. David White was in town this week. J. II. St...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 4 December 1886

OL GREAT FALLS TRIBUNE VOL.2. GREAT FALLS, MONTANA TERRITORY, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4. I886, NO 29 COULTER'S FALLS.* It may not be generally known how the little falls of about ten feet, between the Giant Spring and Rainbow Falls came to be named. If even this water power was not in such high-toned company it would be considered enough in itself, to warrant the future of a town. But we are so bouti fully supplied with water falls and cata racts that we hardly appreciate one of less pretension than Black Eagle. That man Colter, for whom "Colter's Falls" are nam ed had a wonderful career in the wild we t. lie was with the Lewis and Clarke expedition and afterwards suddenly turn ed up with the party of hardy fur-traders sent out by John J. Astor. In Irving's "As toria" we find an interesting account of Colter's adventures. W hen he fell in with the Astor outfit he had just made one of those vast internal voyages so characteristic of this fearless class of men. He had come from the head wa...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 4 December 1886

WASHINGTON LETTER. Prom Our Reguki r Correspondent. WASHINGTON, Nov. 19, 1886. Once more the streets of the capital have assumed their winter activity, and the ho tel corridors show signs of the approach ing session. The agile feet as well as the ponderous gouty ones of senators, repre sentatives and politicans again press as ]phalt pavements, and many familiar faces and figures are seen on Pennsylvania ave ;nue on business schemes or pleasure bent. rQuite a large number of strangers are in Sown also, and each day more are added fto their number. Some of the federal office holders who save been a little too active in political work are here to make their excuses, the _Benton case having made many of them -anxious. Senator Vest, who came some days ago is said to be trying to do some thing for Mr. Benton, although the senator denies having been solicited to do so and -other congressmen will come to the de fense of their political friends. The Japanese Prince who has been tray -eling i...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 4 December 1886

IH[DIEN TREASURES. (From page 7.) centrated upon one issue: Does Mac know? Did he see me? and then comes a .kindly word. "What is it? What's the matter Bill?" -My panting lips vaguely and fearfully utter "run away," hardly conscious of what my tounge has spoken, but terribly anxious that his searching gaze shall not discover my secret I turn away my head He laughs and says: "It must have been a bad runaway, your groans and grunts woke me up. I suppose the wagon was crushing every bone in your body when you yelled and woke up?" His solution of my dream restored meto my senses and 'yes, yes,' I gasped, glad to believe he had not penetrated the secret of my nightmare. In slippered feet out doors he went, re turning in a moment with a pitcher of ice cold water from the spring. Lemon-su gar came out from a little cupboard and before aware of it and unresistingly he raised me up and put to my lips the re freshing, cooling drink, and after I had -drank, laid me back upon the pillow with al...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
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