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Title: Cayton's Weekly Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 713 items from Cayton's Weekly, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 8 February 1919

NATION-WIDE PROHIBITION National ruin is staring us in -the face if we are to believe the prophets who think the prohibition amendment to the United States Constitution a blunder. They assure us that we are in for an epidemic of Bol shevism as a protest against the infringe ment of personal liberty; an increase of unemployment, already made acute by de mobilization; an increased burden of tax ation, made necessary by the loss of excise revenue; a depression of real-estate values in our bit; cities; an increased aggressive ness on the part of the forces of inteler ance, as foreshadowed in the statement of a W. C. T. V. official that "the next cam paign will be against cigarets, gambling, and profanity"; a reluctance on the part of Europeans to come to a land where they will be denied their accustomed alcoholic beverages; a great increase in "moonshin ing"; an aggravation of the drug evil; the growth of a national spirit of hypocrisy; and a contempt for law, born of inevitable failure...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 8 February 1919

CAN CHRISTIANITY TOLERATE THE CHURCH? Where the question "Can democracy toler ate the Church?" some thoughtful Ameri cans would promptly reply, No. Democracy has use for religion in its business. It can not permit so vital a social function to be monopolized and arbitrarily controlled by private interests. Religion, like every other universal human concern, must be brought under community control, if democracy is fully to vindicate itself. A church bearing a sect name and exploiting society in the interests of a sect idea cannot be tolerated by a thoroughgoing democracy. Religion is too vital a social function for its institu tions to be monopolized by private cor porations. The great majority are still reconciled to laissez faire in religion. Democracy can tolerate almost anything. Even such insti tutions as the present hodge-podge of re ligious organization are not beyond its com placency. Democratic society suffers a great deal which it does not approve. Even ma jorities do not a...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 8 February 1919

AT KLUX BEXEVOLENT BUNCH Par be it from us to cast reflections or to speak in a derogatory way about any person or set of persons who are trying even in a humble way to do their part toward making this old world a better place for mankind to live in. To be constantly misunderstood and misjudged takes all the joy out of life, and besides, it is a tiresome task, this everlasting explaining. So we mortals should be a little more charitable in our criticisms, should analyze and weigh both sides of a subject before passing judg meni ; by thus doing ofttimes we can throw roses rather than thorns in the pathway of others. It is one thing to preach and another to practice what you preach. In order to be consistent it behooves us to make a clean breast of the thing and get it off our con science or rather our chests. We have said much about an infamous organization in the south, known as the Ku Klux Klan. Have raked it up one side and down the other; now, after reading the purposes of this g...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 15 February 1919

J@agf£ofs&Jzee&g PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTONS WEEKLY Published t-vn.v (Saturday at Seattle, Washington U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up. 1' A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates marie to clubs ami societies. HORACE ROROOE C,\ YTON . . FJditor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, "Vash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TJ!~T!PTr<»*T;R. be' View 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South EDITORIAL COMMENT Aii amusing incident in connection with the late sympathetic strike in Seattle Avas related to us one day this week. It will he remembered that almost every union in the city ordered its members to quit work, and that too. wjthout grievance, in sympathy for the shipyard workers and they religiously .'id so. To he sure, that was a Damon and Pythias stunt alright,...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 15 February 1919

The critical illness of Gov. Lister at this particular time is regretted by every citizen of the state, who wants to see every one reap the rewards of his labors. Gov. Lister luis hiuh ideals of statecraft and he had Imped to see the present Legislature incor porate many of his ideas into statutory laws. He has carefully studied the needs of the st;ile and the various public institutions have been constantly under his watchful cue ;uid being politically ambitious, there is no tloubi but that his recommendations were For their good. Gov, Lister has been twice elected chief executive of the state of Washington despite the fact he is a Democrat, while the political sentiment of die slate is overwhelmingly Republican, which of itself demonstrates his personal political poularity. Seattle'h sympathetic strike has flat-foot c(l|y Failed and "I told you so" is in order. The \i'v\ idea nf distressing the capitali istic class for not granting the shipyard workers their demands was ridiculous...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 15 February 1919

Mr. George Maney, Seattle, Wash. Mr. William W. Seymour, Tacoma, Wash. Mr. Krank S. Baker, Tacoma, Wash. Mr. C. 11. Graves. Tacoma, Wash. Mr. James 11. Davis, Tacoma. Wash. Mrs. Estella Maiulersoii, Seattle, Wash. Trustees. ABRAHAM LINCOLN By John F. Cragwell America is an empire of beauty and wealth. Within its borders there are some of the grandest, ablest and bravest men and women of this century. But greater still it is the land of equal opportunity. That this is so is because by the stroke of a pen Abraham Lincoln gave freedom to the wrong ed millions of my race. When Lincoln was 16 he assisted a neigh bor to build a flat boat, which conveyed them to the city of New Orleans. This was the first time Lincoln ever saw paved streets, hundreds of houses, lights, and real civilization. In his wanderings for the first time he saw an auction sale of slaves. The victim was a young mulatto girl not over 20, and when he saw ft big, strong man pat her arm, pinch her legs, and make her run ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 15 February 1919

injr in his own person to heights of strength ;iikl |>o\v< •]• which have been reached only by lew. he was made aware how little the ai hiiiibiriiis of authority can amouni to in comparison with the freely exerted force of many when high purpose has made their lic.'iis one. We hear far too much of Lin coln tin 1 kindly comrade, Lincoln the mar tyr, ;iikl Par too little of Lincoln the leader of iiuMi. Pitiful mid human and humble lie surely w;is by the proof of nearly half ;i century, and yel he could hold to a greal resolve through months of failure and de spair ;is sternly ;is earth's granite endures the evil passing of Btorm and fire. He was murdered by one fanatic, yel he subdued capable men of anger and intense prejudices mill mastered them into true Bervice of the cause whose needs he saw clearly while they were guessing. Humility and entire disre gard of self can be the marks of a greal leader, and Lincoln's r\\\c could forego .ill garniture of pomp. Mis qualities were h...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 22 February 1919

J@a^Zch&Jzee^f PRICE FIVE CENTS Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOTC CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, ""Vash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. If General High Cost Living is not soon put down for the count then we miss our guess. The following brief facts have been taken from a statement by a public official: "There is tremendous prdouction going on in this country. Extreme prices have encouraged the raising of everything. There is a bumper crop of wheat and corn. There fore cows and hens will be well fed, and they will he productive. In the United States there is today $575,000,000 worth of cattle more tha...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 22 February 1919

ever, the man in question has so much love lor the colored folks, if he had used his think tank he would have readily seen he could have been of far greater service to the colored folks by remaining a white man and using his influence with his white friends to better the conditions of the black folks. What the black folks of this country need more than anything else is a strong friend at court, who eats and sleeps with the ruling class of white folks, and who will plead their case when they are not present. TOPICS IN BRIEF .John Barleycorn's last order will be a bier. —Newark News. So far it seems to be "victory without peace.''—Pittsburgh Dispatch. The line that stood at Chateau-Thierry must not become a bread-line.—Detroit News. When national prohibition goes into effect even Maine will be dry.—Arkansas Gazette. Now that women are no longer knitting sweaters, we fear a return of the doily peril. — Washington Post. Berlin, once ambitious to run the govern ments of the world, is now...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 22 February 1919

The National Equal Rights League, a Negro organization, speaking, it says, for ''15,000,000 Americans notoriously suffering flagrant deprivations of democracy,' calls on the peace delegates to insist upon the principle of "elimination of civil, political and judicial disabilities and distinctions based on race and color in all nations for the new era of freedom everywhere." The 28th Annual Tuskegee Negro Con ference was held at Tuskegee Institute be ginning "Wednesday, January 22, 1919, and concluded Thursday, January 23rd. A London dispatch announces that Gen. Smuts; leader in England's military control in South and East Africa, had called into conference representatives of allied news paers, and aroused much interest. He fav ored a policy of concilation with reference to African peoples. Sergeant Hardy of the machine gund company of the 369 th infantry was the editor of a trench newspaer he called the "Black Herald." His publication was a one sheet typewritten daily, which was pri...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 22 February 1919

will cast yon up on the sand. Whereupon the convert said, "May be so parson, maybe so. Parson you may know whales, but you don't know these Mississipi alligators. If ever a Mississippi alligator swallows a colored man he'd go off and go to sleep and ferget all about him.'' Mike was on a sinking ship and was watching with interest the frantic passen gers grabbing life preservers, putting them mi and jumping overboard. "Shure," he said, "if ivverybody\s stealing, I kin too." Immediately he picked up a heavy piece of iron and .jumped overboard. Siillie and .lane fnond themselves seated next to each other at the Christmas dinner parly and immediately became confidential. "Molly told me that you told her that secret that I told yon not to tell her," whispered Sallie. "()h. isn't she the mean thing I" gasped •lane. "Why I told her not to tell you." "Well," returned Sallie, "I told her that 1 wouldn't tell you she told me—so don't tell her I did." Mrs. Jones: "Have you heard any *good news...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 1 March 1919

J&igZch& MeeA&r PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TET.EFHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South. WILSON'S PEACE PACT Theoretically the League of Nation's may be the world's desideratum, but when ad vocated by a southern Democrat we view it with an eye of suspicion. President Wilson, the foremost advocate of this world's peace pact, is president of the United States be cause he received the vote of the Solid Soutli and there is a solid south because the white citizens of that section have l...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 1 March 1919

business it is the concensus of opinion that lie would be a splendid success. Prior to going to Camp Lewis he pastored the Grace Presbyterian Church of this city. May perhaps BUch enterprising persons as Mr. and Mrs. G. B. Miller of this city will fail in their business undertakings, hut we seriously doubt it. After purchasing 3 rather worse for wear looking building they began at once to re-model and re pair the same and now they have a well arranged, seven apartment house building, each of which is occupied and the whole bringing a nice return on the money in vested. Mrs. Miller runs a store and deli catessen in connection and last, but by no wise least, Mr. Miller has opened up a hand laundry in the basement, which is do inu well. If that is not catching them go in**; and coming then "tell me." To get persona] in public gatherings be cause some one differs from you shows a sad lacking of judgment as well as self control. You have your opinion, arise and express your opinion witho...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 1 March 1919

sail for France on the 15th, however, on reaching Chicago it was learned that there were serious difficulties in our way of get ting pass ports from the state department in Washington. Because of this unexepected condition, Lawyer Perry Howard of Jack son, Miss., and Attorney J. H. Josey, Madi son, Wis., and myself headed direct from Chicago to the Nation's Capital, arriving there about 1 o'clock Sunday morning. On Monday morning the writer of this article was in conference with ex-Congress man W. E. Humphries and Senator Wesley L. Jones of Seattle only to find that the delegates were up against a disposition up on the part of the state department not to grant pass ports to any of the credited delegates. The contention of the delegates and their friends with the state depart ment continued through 21 days which was long, tedious and expensive. Finally on the first day of February the department issued the following statement to all applicants for pass ports to the Pan African Congre...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 1 March 1919

Then one of the waiters slipped up to his chief and whispered, "Dese ere gem'men must be dem secret service people we hearn so much erbout today." Dr. Henry Moskowitz, commissioner of public markets, said iii an address in New York : "A cynical and self-seeking spirit pre vailed in buying and selling when the war began, bul this spirit is being fast sup planted by a generous spirit of co-operation and fraternity. "The cynical spirit, now happily on the wane .was like that of the aged banker, who said to a friend: " 'Yes. 1 expect to marry one of 'the proudest and most beautiful girls in New York. You see, a young suitor sings to his sweetheart, "Love me—and the world is mine." But I've got a better method, by jingo. I sing, "Love me—and the world is thine." I'm bound to win out, don't you think so, George?' " A useful sort of cook was Mary Jane. l>ul on one occasion she introduced a rather doubtful egg into a pudding with somewhat painful results. "Really, Mary," said her mistres...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 8 March 1919

J@aif2cfs&iMeeAfa PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle. Washington. U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, ""Vash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. ET.EPITOJTE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South CONGRESS HAS ADJOURNED No one realizes that congress has ad journed so keenly as Woodrow Wilson. Yes congress has adjourned and in doing so it uncrowned the man who has been running the United States all by his lonely. For thirty-six hours prior to the adjourn ment of congress the Republican members of the senate took fiendish delight in maul ing the political ego out of the autocrat of the White H...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 8 March 1919

EDITORIAL PARAGRAPHS From time to time we have advocated in these columns ahe advisability of young colored men getting a better education than the young white men and we again urge it. In life the colored man will be either at the top or the bottom. If highly educated he will be at the top, if not well educated he will be at the bottom. For the colored man there is no middle ground. The young colored man well educated and with either a trade or a profession well mastered will have little or no trouble in getting by, but the young man with either a smattering of nn education or none at all will have a hard time to get the most menial employ ment. At present an overwhelming ma jority of the young colored men quit school as soon as they have finished their course in the graded schools or after the first year in high school and for the battle of life they have nothing with which to protect them selves. To the colored boy the future is a long lea]) in the dark while to the white boy the...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 8 March 1919

THE PASSING THRONG The brand new undertaking parlors of A. D. Richardshon were thrown open to the public for inspection last Saturday and those who saw them said, well done. While this institution is neither a Bonney-Watson or Butterworth & Sons, yet it is highly commendable and stands an example of in dustry and determination. The establish ment is complete within itself and does not have to do any farming out business. Mr. Richardson, the prpprietor, is the only li censed and registered embalmer of color in the Northwest and with his profession he has joined business and as a result he has the foundation for an undertaking busi ness that if half cared for will within the next two years be worth ten fold more than it is at the present time. Already Mr. Richardson is being patronized by the Chi nese, Japanese and Jews as well as by his own people and he says on this point "my parlors are for the dead without regard to creed, color or condition." MR. MANEY ANSWERED To the Editor,...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 8 March 1919

STOLEN FROM THIEVES After five unsuccessful years of running horses, the owner had at last triumphed, I>ul surely there" was never such bad luck. He had won his first race all right, but the jockey was overweight. The owner was gloomy. The jockey was gloomy. The aspect was decidedly gloomy, but it cleared somewhat when the owner sidled ii|) to the jockey and said: "Can't you think of something to lessen your weight!" "Don't think so, sir." " Have you shaved?" " Yes. sir, before the race." "Finger nails clipped?" An inspection showed that nothing was to be hoped for there, and the owner's face resinned its look of gloom, until suddenly another idea occurred to him. "Here," he said, "give me your false teeth when no body is looking." •lust because a man is an officer in the territorials, it doesn't mean to say he can ride a horse. Ai least, that was the case with Col. Knut of the Twttleton Tarriers. An inspection was to him a nightmare. So when the general commanding came along, Co...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 15 March 1919

J&igf2ch& iMe&6&( PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TET.EPKONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South EDITORIAL PARAGRAPHS Cayton's Weekly to the contrary not withstanding, I, Horace Roscoe Cayton, am exceedingly glad that the shipyard strike has been declared off and the men again at work. The past attitude of the editor hereof toward striking unions may not har monize with his attitude at this time, and so widely different are the two that an ex planation is almost necessary. When the sh...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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