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Elephind.com contains 12,580 items from National Tribune, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 3 September 1881

.J STEW SEBIES. W FRONT OF YORKTOWN. ITS EVACUATION BY THE CONFEDERATES. How the Pickett; Took the Town Blown Up by Torncdot-". A Johnny Ileb-A Happy Contraband 200-Found Shells and a Demolished Cook-honsc. For The National Tribuxk. During the latter part of April tlie enemy made many attempts to drive in the Union pickets and take the rifle-pits constructed espe cially upon the right of the line in front of York town. They were repulsed, however, upon each occasion. The parallels were well up to the rebel works by the 1st of May, nearly all the besieging guns in position, and it was generally expected that by the 5th or Gth at farthest they would be opened in force. On the night of the 3d the men in the trenches, as well as the pickets beyond, were made aware of the fact that something unusual was transpir ing -within the Confederate stronghold. There was an unusual activity manifested, and in several localities large fires lit up the horizon, and in some instances revealed the gri...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 3 September 1881

THE NATIONAL TKIBDNE: WASHINGTON", D. C, SEPTEMBER 3, 1883, For The National Tjuhcnk. MORNING, NOON, AND NIGHT. J. S. M.ATKK. Mil the green foliage hird-voiees singing Single with laughter of children at play. Over the meadow the music goes ringing, Echoing farther and farther away. Flowers up-springing, Perfumes are bringing, Scattering freely their sweet nos in air; Sunlight is streaming Dewdrops are gleaming, Gems on the biwnn of Nature so fair. Earth's feathered choristers swiftly are winging Hither and yon, warbling greetings to Day, "While the soft summer breeze slily is flinging Sweet, tender kisses to (lower and spray. II. Down from on high golden sunlight is streaming, Startling earth's green with it hot, burning gaze. Uivulets threading the meadow lie gleaming "Whiter than silver beneath its bright ray-. Valley and mountain, ltiverand fountain Murmur and sigh as the hour drag-' along; Neath the sun's pow'r Stoops every florw'r Hn-hed as by magic is each merry song. Slowly ...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 3 September 1881

THE NATIONAL TRIBUNE: WASHINGTON,. C, SEPTEMBER 3, 1881. 3 MY WIFE AND I. Loiik time we've sailed, my wife ami I, On the n)iiiR tide of years ; Fometinies. beneath a elear blue i-ky Sometime through a cloud of tears. Lonjr time we "vc tailed o'er life's rouh sea 'sonietiines in sadness sometimes in glee. We've journeyed lonjr, my wife and I, Through dark and stormy weather; Sometimes our heaitr- would moan and sijrh As thus we sailed together; Hut the sun's bright rays wouhj conic at last To tell that our frriefs were over-past. And when we sailed, my wife and I, Through the Ion?, dark, dreary night, We knew the stars still shone on high Though we saw no twinkling light ; Anil our hearts grew strong, as oceairrise Showed Heme's bright gleam to our weary eyes. "We've journeyed far, my wife and I, Since our voyage first begun, But golden shores are drawing nigh As we drift 'neath setting sun; And we hope to drift o'er death's dark tide As we've sailed in hfe yet side by side. CJkik. P...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 3 September 1881

THE NATIONAL TRIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, SEPTEMBEK 8, 1881. The National Tribune PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. To CARE FOR HIM WHO HAS BORNE THE BATTLE, AND FOR HIS VIDOW AND ORPHANS." ABRAHAM LINCOLN. ' Terms to Subscribers, Payable in Advance: (postage prepaid) ONE COPY, ONE YEAR -FIVE COPIES " $1.50 6.25 ONE COPY THREE MONTHS ----- 50 ONE COPY SIX MONTHS ----- 75 TEN COPIES, (with extra copy to getter-up of cluo,) 12.50 A SPECIMEN NUMBER of our paper 6ent free on rcquest. TERMS FOR ADVERTISING furnisheo upon application. -TO SUBSCRIBERS. When changing your -ADDRESS PLEASE GIVE FORMER AS WELL AS PRESENT ADDRESS, WITH COUNTY AND STATE. 43KTAKE NOTICE. In sending money for sub- SCRtPTIONS BY MAIL, NEVER INCLOSE THE CURRENCY EXCEPT IN A REGISTERED LETTER. A POSTAL MONEY ORDER OR A DRAFT ON NEW YORK IS THE BEST FORM OF REMITTANCE. LOSSES BY MAIL WILL BE MOST SURELY AVOIDED IF THESE DIRECTIONS ARE FOL IOWED. -ss'-no responsibility is assumed for subscrip tions paid to agents, which must be ...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 3 September 1881

THE NATIONAL TBIBUNE: WASHINGTON, I). C, SEPTEMBER 3, 1881. 5 Pensions to Prisoners of War. Ill view of Hie many inquiries received by us in regard to the matter, a representative of The National Tkibuxe recently interviewed Hon. "W. W. Dudley in reference to the subject of pen sions to prisoners of war. After an exchange of courtesies, the Tkihuxk man observed: ""Well, Mr. Commissioner, I see you arc being "reported in the papers as favoring the granting of pensions to all Union soldiers who were at any time prisoners of war?" Commissioner D. aThen I am not reported correctly. It is not my intention to recommend any legislation to Congress on the subject, but some such legislation may be attempted." "But how. then, do you account for the idea that has got out that you favor such legislation ?" asked our reporter. "It probably originated," responded the Commisioner, "in the fact that in the event of any such legislation I will probably be called upon for data upon which Congress may...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 3 September 1881

THE NATIONAL TBIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, SEPTEMBER 8, 1881. 6 "LITTLE BY LITTLE." " Little by little," the torrent said, As it swept uln!i in its narrow bed, Chafing in wrath and pride ; ' Little by little, and day by day," And with every wave it bore away A tfrain of Mind from the banks which lay Like granite walls on either side. It came again, and the niching tide Covered the valley far and wide, For the mighty banks were gone; " Little by little, and day by day," A grain at a time they were swept away, And now the fields and meadows lay ruder the waves for the work was done. " Little by little,'" the tempter said, As a dark and cunning snare he spread For the young unwary feet," " Little by little, and day by day, I will tempt the careless soul astray Into the broad and flowery way, I'ntil the ruin is made complete.' " Little by little. sure and .-low, We fashion our future of bliss or woe, As the present passes away. Our feet are climbing the pathway bright, Fp to the regions of...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 3 September 1881

THE NATIONAL TRIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, SEPTEMBER 3, 1881. . RIDING DOWN. O, did you see him riding down, And riding down, while nil the town Came out to sec, came out to sec, And all the bells were mad with glee? O, did yon hear those bells ring out, The bells ring out, the people shout, And did you hear that eheer on cheer That over all the bells rang clear? And did you sec the waving flags, The fluttering flag, the tattered flags, Red, white, and blue, shot through and through, Baptized with battle's deadly dew? And did you hear the drums' gay beat, The drums'' gay beat, the bugles sweet, The cymbals' clash, the cannon's crash, That rent the sky with sound and flash? And did you see me waiting there. Just waiting there and watching there, One little lass, amid the mass That prosed to see the hero pass? And did you see him smiling down, Ami smiling down, as riding down With slowest pace, with stately grace, lie caught the vision of a face My face, uplifted red and white, Turned re...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 3 September 1881

THE NATIONAL TRIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, SEPTEMBER 3, 1881. PERHAPS. lie: Pcrmips the s-iars mny cease to -bine. Perhaps the sun may set To rise no more; or, darling mine, Perhaps you may forget. She : Ferhap?, jf M1n and stars should die, My love might live for aye. Perhaps i" Hope' Mvcet by and by Your fears may pass away. Both: Perhaps we'll walk, through long, long yenrc, Life's pathway side by side, 'Neath sunny sky, or cloud of tear, Wluehevcr shall Iwjtide. Perliaps wc will, and, if Ave do, We may, perliaps, agree To measure life, and living, too, By God's eternity. Ghik. OLD GRAVES, THE SHOWMAN. "Now you're talking sense," said J. A. Graves, or "Old Graves,' as he is known to showmen in this country and in Europe, when a Times reporter yesterday suggested that the orang-outang was a wonderful animal. "Wonderful," resumed the aged but yet sprightly showman, is no term far reaching enough to express the sagacity and learn ing of that, I may say, fellow-creature. You will pardon...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 10 September 1881

"TO CARE FOR HIM WHO HAS BORNE THE BATTLE, AND FOR HIS WIDOW AND ORPHANS." ESTABLISHED 1877. "WASHINGTON", "D. C., SATUBDAYj SEPTEMBER 10, 1883 NEW SERIES. Vol. I., No. 4. THE ATTACK ON LEE'S 51 ILLS. ACROSS THE RIVER, INTO THE RIFLE-PITS. A (Jalhint Affair Hon the Vermonter.. Crowd the I:im. A Tonrhint; Tiiridcnt m-fli of Prhate Scott. "God IMoss President Lincoln." By P. D. IF. For Tin: National Tr.iiurxr:. Having read with much interest the article "In Front of Yorktown," published in Tin-: National Tribune of August 27th, I send the following as my remembrance of the tight near Lee's Mills on the lGth of April. 18G2, referred to therein : I was an eye-witness to the engagement, which took place on the farm of Mrs. Garrow, whose house had been burned by order of General Ma gnifier. The chimneys at each end of the build ing were still standing. The Warwick River ran through this farm, and its Tight bank was occupied and fortified by the rebels. Just in front of their works they ha...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 10 September 1881

THE NATIONAL TRIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, SEPTEMBER 10, 1881. THE BOSUN'S SONG. You may talk of your prima donnas "Who move vast crowds to tears, You may talk of the song of the woodland birds And the music of the spheres; But I've listened to sweeter music Than ever you have heard Prom throat of man or woman, From angel or from bird. Yet the singer was Pipes the bosun, And it never before was known, Though he hummed a sea song now and then, That his voice had a musical tone. "We'd been cruising in the West Indies For many a weary day, "With nothing to do but think of home And loved ones far away Of sweethearts, wives, and little ones That we might ne'er sec more; For hurricanes were rife at sea, And Yellow Jack on shore. "We hnd dropped in at Samana Bay, And were waiting quietly there For orders from the admiral To go we knew not where. But we'd laid two weeks at anchor Under a broiling sun, Listlessly thinking that any change Must needs be a better one ; "When we sighted the flagshi...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 10 September 1881

THE NATIONAL TBIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, SEPTEMBEB 10, 1881. 1 LOVE SONG. By General W. H. Lytle. Killed at the Battle of Chicamauga.) Nay, frown not, fairest, chide no more, Nor blame the blushing wine, Its fiery kiss is innocent, When thrills thy pui&c with mine. Then leave the goblet in my hand, And veil thy glances bright, Lest wine and beauty mingling, Should wreck my soul to-night. Then, sweetest, to the ancient rim, In sculptured beauty rare, Bow down thy red-arched lips and quaff The wine, that conquers care. Or breathe upon the shining cup Till that its perfume be Sweet as the hcent of orange caves Upon some tropic sea. And while thy fingers idly stray In dalliance o'er thy lyre, Sing to me, love, some rare old song, That gushed from hearts of fire Songs such as Grecian phalanx hymned When freedom's field was won And Persia's glory with the light Faded at Marathon. Sing till the shouts of armed men Ring bravely out once more ; Sing till again the ghost-white tents Shine ...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 10 September 1881

4: THE NATIONAL. TB1BUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, SEPTEMBER 1.0, 1881. The National Tribune PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. TO CARE FOR HIM WHO HAS DORNE THE BATTLE, AND FOR HIS WIDOW AND ORPHANS." ABRAHAM LINCOLN. Terms to Subscribers, Payable in Advance: (postage prepaid) ONE COPY, ONE YEAR FIVE COPIES " $1.50 - 6.25 ONE COPY THREE MONTHS ----- 50 ONE COPY SIX MONTHS ----- 75 TEN COPIES, (with extra copy to getter-up of club,) 12.50 A SPECIMEN NUMBER of our paper sent free on request. TERMS FOR ADVERTISING furnished upon application. JdS-TO SUBSCRIBERS. When changing your ADDRESS PLEASE GIVE FORMER AS WELL AS PRESENT ADDRESS, WITH COUNTY AND STATE. TAKE NOTICE In sending money for sub scriptions BY MAIL, NEVER INCLOSE THE CURRENCY EXCEPT IN A REGISTERED LETTER. A POSTAL MONEY ORDER OR A DRAFT ON NEW YORK IS THE BEST FORM OF REMITTANCE. LOSSES BY MAIL WILL BE MOST SURELY AVOIDED IF THESE DIRECTIONS ARE FOL LOWED. jfcsno responsibility is assumed for subscrip tions paid to agents, which must be...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 10 September 1881

i THE NATIONAL. T1BUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, SKFTEMBEK 10, 1881. o v PRESIDENT GARFIELD. The long talked-of removal of the President from the White House was carried into effect on Tuesday last. At ten o'clock p. m. Monday the houe Avas closed for the night, and orders were given to admit no one within the gates. The consequence was that from that time up to half past three the White House was seemingly buried in profound repose. But few 1 ights could he seen within the house, and the large gaslights at the door lit up a deserted scene. All through the silent watches of the night there was hardly a stir. Now and then a solitary policeman passed up the walk or appeared upon the portico : hut all else was silent and still as death. A small number of men. principally negroes, hung about the gates all night. But they drowsed on the stone coping, and the scene outride was equally as quiet. The only break in the monotony was the driving in the grounds of the steward's wagon, followed by a ba...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 10 September 1881

THE NATIONAL' TRIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, SEPTEMBER 10, 1881. THE HAND THAT ROCKS THE WORLD. BY WILLIAM BOSS WALLACE. Blessings on the hand of woman ! Angels guard its strength and grace In the palace, cottage, hovel Oh, no matter where the place ! "Would that never storms assailed it ; Rainbows ever gently curled ; For the hand that rocks the cradle Is the hand that rocks the world. Infancy's the tender fountain ; Bowers may with beauty flow ; Mothers first to guide the streamlet, From their souls unresting grow, Grow on for the good or evil, Sunshine streamed or darkness hurled : For the hand that rocks the cradle Is the hand that rocks the Avorld. Woman ! how divine your mission, Here upon our natal sod ! Keep, oh keep, the young heart open Always to the breath of God ! All true trophies of the ages Are from mother love impended ; For the hand that rocks the cradle Is the hand that rocks the world. Blessings on the hand of woman ! Fathers, sons, and daughters cry ; And the sacred ...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 10 September 1881

h' THE NATIONAL TEIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, SEPTEMBEB 10, 1881. MOSAIC POETRY. only know she came nnd went, Like troutlcts in a pool ; She was a phantom of delight, And I was like a fool. "One kiss, dear maid," I said and sighed, " Out of those lips unshorn," She shook her ringlets round her head, And laughed in merry scorn. Ring out, wild bells, to the wild sky! Yes, hear them, oh my heart ! 'Tis twelve at night by the castle clock, Beloved, we must part ! "Come back! come back!" she cried in grief, " My eyes are dim with tears How shall I live through all the days, All through a hundred years?" Tvas in the prime of summer time. She blest me with her hand ; We strayed together, deeply blest. Into the Dreaming land. The laughing bridal roses blow, To dress her dark brown hair; No maiden may with her compare. Most beautiful, most rare! Lowell. Hood. Wordsworth. Eastman. Coleridge. Longfellow. Stoddard. Tennyson. Tennyson. Alice Carey. Coleridge. Alice C&rey. Campbell. Bayard Taylo...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 10 September 1881

8- THE NATIONAL TEUBUNE: WASHINGTON, I). i. SEPTEMBER 10. 3 SSL & GARFIELD. Garfield, our Nation's noblest, son. Honored for noble deeds well done, A cruel foe hath laid thee low, And Life, with faltering, sluggish flow, Would yield thee up, with faulting breath, To undeserved, untimely Death! But rouse thee. Chieftain! rouse and hear! A Nation calls, thy heart to cheer; And earnest heart on Heaven call To hold thee up nor let thee fall. We fain would prove our love with deeds, And meet with lavish gifts thy need-. ' With flying feet we quick would go With willing hands quick help bestow With tenderest care would ease thy pain, And bring thee back to life again. But, while we may no aid bestow, We call on Heaven to mercy show To stay the ebbing flood of Life, Restore thy strength, and quell the strife Already fought with Death so long The strife begun by cruel wrong. Heaven grant thee, Chieftain, brother, friend. New lease of life, whose fnr-ofl'cnd, Crowned with the honors of l...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 17 September 1881

"TO CARE FOR HIM WHO HAS BORNE THE BATTLE, AND FOR HIS WIDOW AND ORPHANS." ESTABLISHED 1877 WASHINGTON", D. C, SATUJRDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 7, 1881. NEW SEBIES. V-I., N- 5. f THE GROTON CENTENNIAL. 1 HOW THE BRITISH TOOK THE TOWN. Arnold's Shame and England's Dishonor General Han ley's Speech Scenes and Incident, of the Occasion What Gen. Sherman Said. From Army and Navy Journal. Thirty thousand persons were present at the Centennial celebration, on Tuesday and Wednes day, of the burning of New London and the cap ture of Fort Griswold, on Groton Heights. The view of the shipping Monday evening. " -' ument Hill, the Tennessee, flying the flag of ; Rear-Admiral Wyman : the Vandalia, the Kear sarge, the Yantic, the Constitution, the .St. Marys and the revenue cutters Dexter and Grant. The Tennessee was under the command of Capt. Mc Crea, and the Constitution under that of Captain Luce. This latter ship is herself almost a cen tn,,nr;on Ttrvcwlpq tlip;p there were in the harbor ' the steamers...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 17 September 1881

0. THE NATIONAL TRIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, SEPTEMBER 17, 1881. A SUMMER SONG. Under the willows the wild birds sung In the sunset glow of fiery gold, And the echoes back from the forest rang Like fairy chimes in the days of old : " Tti whit ! tu weet I Tu whit! tu weet! Oiw days are blest, our dreams are sweet, Though nights be dark and cold ! " Under the willows the wild birds sang In the sunset glow of fiery gold, And answering notes from the forest rang Like fairy chimes in the days of old ; Sweeping sorrows into the past, With a joyous scourge and a backward cast, Hurling the demon of discontent To his native gloom with pinions rent. While a prean followed his flying feet, -And the air was filled with songsters fleet : " Tu whit ! tu Aveet ! Tu whit ! tu weet ! Our days are blest, our dreams are sweet, Though nights be dark and cold ! " "Under the willows the wild birds sang In the sunset glow of fiery gold, And the melody back from the forest rang, Like fairy chimes in the days...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 17 September 1881

THE NATIONAL TJRIBUNB: WASHINGTON, D. C, SEPTEMBER 17, 1881. 3 For The National. Tkiiiuxu. THE FORLORN HOPE. Two hours we lay on Hie battle's mnrgc In siKht of the conflict's blood -rcI wave?. Then came the order for us to charge; And shadowy forms of new-made graves "Rose on our sight as the bugle shrill Called the men to arms. The ranks fell in. The regiment formed to storm the hill, From whose fearful crest would soon begin To bellow monsters whose food is death. And who gorge themselves at each hot breath. The Fifth was only three hundred strong Twns twite that number a month before And the eyes of our colonel ran along But a shortened line as he gazed it o'er; Yet his gal hint heart was undismayed As he looked beyond to deadly height "Whose crown of cannon and men arrayed Shone clear in the summer's golden light; For lie knew the souls of those who stood To do hix will, in the sheltering wood. " Forward, march ! " the command was given ; And the living line, all tipped with ste...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 17 September 1881

THE NATIONAL TRIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, SEPTEMBER 17, 1881. The National Tribune PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. TO CARE FOR HIM WHO HAS BORNE THE BATTLE, AND FOR HIS WIDOW AND ORPHANS." ABRAHAM LlNCOU. Terms to Subscribers, Payable in Advance: (postage prepaid) , ONE COPY, ONE YEAR FIVE COPIES " $1.50 - .- 6.25 ONE COPY THREE MONTHS ----- 50 ONE COPY SIX MONTHS ----- 75 TEN COPIES, (with extra copy to getter-up of club,) 12.50 A SPECIMEN NUMBER of our paper sent free on request. TERMS FOR ADVERTISING furnished upon application. J-TO SUBSCRIBERS. When changing your ADDRESS PLEASE GIVE FORMER A3 WELL AS PRESENT ADDRESS, WITH COUNTY AND STATE. j&S-TAKE NOTICE. In sending money for sub scriptions BY MAIL, NEVER INCLOSE THE CURRENCY EXCEPT IN A REGISTERED LETTER. A POSTAL MONEY order or a draft on New York IS the best form ' OF remittance. Losses BY mail will be most SURELY AVOIDED IF THESE DIRECTIONS ARE FOL LOWED. No RESPONSIBILITY IS ASSUMED FOR SUBSCRIP TIONS PAID TO AGENTS, WHICH MUS...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
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