ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Free-Lance, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 313 items from Free-Lance, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
313 results
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 14 April 1906

4 Tft© Free-Induce Subscriptions, Payable in Advance. ONE YEAR #l- «n SIX MONTHS THREE MONTHS ow PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY FOR SALE ALL OVER Address all communications to 243 Church Street. THE GRAND EXODUS The Public Ledger (private) is authority for the following statement —“In 63 A. D., during the reign of Nero, the volcanic nature of Mount Vesuvius first manifested itself.” Is that so? We are glad you told us. We would not have known otherwise. This may be received as historical information by people who like that sort of historical information. The Public Ledger should avail itself of the right matter for copying in its editorial work. A half a million years ago Vesuvius was operating with all the vigor of its maturity. In 63 A. D., the time the Ledger claims Vesuvius first manifested itself, this volcano, along with most of the others of earth, were entering upon the period of their senescence, and the eruptions that have taken place since that date are mere trifles compared wi...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 14 April 1906

Sa \ "*'■ £KSj\I aA B=7 V=§ ___ B| ___*_ liSpS y |Pj =u-7/J E B HELL AND ITS ENVIRONS “Faith,” says one of the most damaging of the infidel philosophers, “is the subjective error of mankind.” The force of this sentence is well nigh overpowering, and might be quite so, were it not that by the same process of reasoning the very philosophy by which he reaches the conclusion could be likewise explained away, and hence every evidence of life and destiny, of nature and being, resolved into the mere phantasms of a momentary Error deluded into a belief of his own existence, and passing at last into the nothingness from whence it came. It is passing strange that the powers of intellect should be applied to the task of proving itself but brother to the clod, and yet the legions of this hopeless creed are numerous and their efforts untiring. It is not our purpose to enter upon a discussion of so tremendous a subject, one upon which whole literatures have been written, and one to which the most...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 14 April 1906

6 THE HEATHEN CHINEE. Which I wish to remark— And my language is plain— That for ways that are dark, And for tricks that are vain, The heathen Chinee is peculiar, Which the same I would rise to explain. All Sin was his name, And I shall not deny In regard to the same What that name might imply; But Ids smile it was pensive and childlike, As I frequent remarked to Bill Nye. It was August the third, And quite soft was the skies, Which it might he inferred That All Sin was likewise; Yet he played it that day upon William And me in a way I despise. Which we had a small game. And Ah Sin took a hand, It was euchre—the same He ditl not understand; But he smiled as he sat at the table Witli the smile that was ehild-like and bland. A'et the cards they were stacked In a way that I grieve, And my feeling’s were shocked At the state of Nye’s sleeve, Which was stuffed full of aces and bowers, And the same with intent to deceive. But the hands that were played By that heathen Chinee, And the poin...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 14 April 1906

THE “FREE-LANCE” RECORD. ' As champion of individual rights and personal privilege, and the welfare of the poorer people, we have had no competition whatever, that field we occupied exclusively. That the poorer people have failed to see these things and neglected the support due their own cause is unfortunate. We have seldom used the term “labor” in our columns, but labor might have seen that no labor publication in this section has ever struck such staggering blows in its behalf. According to our own light and the evidence in the case, we espoused in politics the cause that seemed to us the least clannish and the best for the masses, but we favor the divorce law in politics whenever the union becomes unbearable, and would seek its shelter if the necessity arose. To the private plunderer of public perquisites this paper has been a pest. To the derelict public official it has been a nightmare. To the respectable old mossback of pernicious influence it has been an obnoxious intruder. ...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 14 April 1906

8 any intention to reflect on the integrity of the Public Ledger in remarks that have been attributed to him.” We are so glad that Mr. Pender came nobly to the rescue of Aunt Arabella. We cannot bear to see the old woman’s feelings hurt with impunity, and Aunt Arabella is so petulant, too. Aunt Arabella has no superfluous amount of sense, but that she is honorable and loaded with integrity no one not otherwise informed will deny. She is about the dullest thing that ever happened in journalism, but she is good, so far as the world knows. The boom in real estate values in and about this city continues with anything but signs of abatement. Land companies are springing up on every side and all are making good. Lot holdings on the outside of the city are daily changing hands with profit to the manipulators. The strangest part is that entire strangers of a few weeks’ residence are turning over real estate transactions and making money on the deals. One nervy Western youth struck town with...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 28 April 1906

Vol. 11. No. 56. OUR STRICKEN SISTER OF THE WEST. OBSERVATIONS ON EARTHQUAKE PHENOM ENA IN WHICH A PROPHECY IS INCLUDED The microscope has revealed the existence of creatures so minute that their whole life is comprised within a few hours of time. They are born, live, and die within the space required for the production of this essay. To them life is just as long as it is for the man of the allotted four score years and ten. They doubtless have their periods of infancy, lusty maturity and old age, and generations of them come and pass in the space of an earthly day. The whole creation is one vast scheme of wonders and whether we probe the infinitisimal with the microscope, or search the immense with the telescope, in both directions the wonder expands and grows according to the power applied to the research. Of the myriads of ants, for instance, that have existed through all time, not one has ever seen or comprehended the creature called man although brought into actual contact with...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 28 April 1906

2 to which no denial is possible. She tantalizes ns with her smiling beauty, but implants the fear of death in our souls. She rears her children but for the sake of sacrificing them upon her own altars. She racks us with her whips of pain, hands us her poison bowl of disease, sends her terrors of storm and earthquake to devastate our little works, and gives us but death and corruption as the reward of our labors. To him that hath but nature for his creed, this life is sad, and death is dark indeed. The calamity that has lately befallen the erstwhile beautiful and prosperous city of San Francisco has spread a gloom over the nation. The people of California have had the dreadful and terror-inspiring experience that the ground, the old earth which they fancied so firm and secure, is nothing of the kind, and that it may be shaken like the ship in a storm. Only those who have passed through such an experience can realize the peculiar and awful horror of this revelation. It is a crushing ...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 28 April 1906

a few bricks upon a kitchen chimney. Let the stricken people of San Francisco see to it that they get their own. GEO. F. VIETT. * THE MARRIAGE OF AUNT ARABELLA In the expressive phraseology of the local lingo, “Aunt Arabella done gone and got married!” This maiden of thirty plus, feeling an aching void in her rather dreary existence, after first getting furiously angry with a lusty masculine youth named the Dispatch, ended by openly soliciting his favors and then marrying him. It was not leap year, but Aunt Arabella cast conventionalities to the winds, wantonly signified her hot desire by goo-goo eyes and other solicitations, and opening her lean and lengthened arms offered him repose. Far be it from us to chime a discordant note in the sweet harmony of the situation. Our congratulations go forth to Aunt Arabella and our condolences to her youthful spouse. We believe in people getting what they want and plenty of it. With the Arizona Kicker we say —“One country, one flag, and one wi...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 28 April 1906

4 Tfte Frse-kanc© Subscriptions, Payable in Advance. ONE TEAK 81'76 SIX MONTHS 90 TUKKK MONTHS 50 PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY, FOR SALE ALL OVER Address all communications to 243 Church Street. “The Deeper Harmonies and Other Poems, a Book of Verses, Essays and Selections,” by George P. Vlett, is about forthcoming from the New York bindery. Advance copies have been received and those who have seen them pronounce the work to be one of the most artistically made books of the day. The gold embellished and colored illuminated covers enclose 304 pages of genuine literary matter. In the second half, consisting of selected literature under the title, “Impressive Passages of Power and Beauty In Prose and Poetry,” there is not a dull or mediocre line. The high quality Is sustained from beginning to end. The first half, consisting of Khc original productions of Mr. Vlett, many of which have appeared in newspapers and magazines in this country, Canada and England, need no commendation to the lite...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 28 April 1906

been one of the worst in the memory of the oldest inhabitant. The day had passed under these conditions and the night brought even greater misery. The writer had been engaged for several hours, in the rear of a long store forming part of a three story brick structure, making up accounts with the assistance of the proprietor. Save for the passing of an occasional street car, then drawn by horses, the city was deathly still. People had retired to their houses and rooms for the relief of divesting themselves of clothing, and most of them were sleeping or trying to sleep. This it is that accounted for the smallest loss of life that ever accompanied a calamity of equal magnitude, there being no safer place during a violent earthquake than the inside of a fairly well constructed house, for the walls invariably fall outward, leaving the floors standing supported by the frame and such portions of the brick walls that have not fallen. Wooden buildings are especially safe for the reason that ...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 28 April 1906

6 WHERE ARE THE WICKED FOLKS BURIED? “Tell me, grey-haired sexton,” I said, “Where in this field arc the wicked folks laid? I have wandered the quiet old grave-yard through, And studied the epitaphs, old and new, But on monument, obelisk, pillar or stone I read no evil that men have done.” The old sexton stood by a grave newly made, With his ehin on his hand, his hand on a spade; I knew by the gleam of his eloquent eye That his heart was instructing his lips to reply—- “ Who is the judge when the soul takes its flight? Who is to judge ’twixt the wrong and the right? Which of us mortals shall dare to say That our neighbor was wicked who died to-day? In our journey through life the farther we speed, The better we learn that humanity’s need Is charity's spirit, that prompts us to find Rather virtue than vice in the lives of our kind.” “Therefore, good deeds we record on these stones; The evil men do let it die with their bones; I have labored as sexton this many a year, But never have ...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 28 April 1906

THE GREAT CHARLESTON EARTHQUAKE. (Continued from page 5) brick houses did not sleep in them for many months afterwards. With the setting of the sun lines of people with bedding under their arms would be seen making their way to tents oh the different parks, and in these assemblages there was scant discrimination of color, creed or condition. The attitude of the colored population was a peculiar and somewhat entertaining feature of those times. Camp meetings were held wherever they congregated and the wierd hymns, chanted and chorused in perfect harmony and time, and given forth with fear—inspired earnestness, would be heard nightly from every section of the city adding a strange solemnity to those memorable nights. Among the phenomena attending the earthquake was the opening of the ground in fissures and their subsequent closing. Numerous minature volcanoes opened in different sections. Instead of vomiting fire and lava these threw out several different colored sands of the finest q...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 28 April 1906

8 Twinkle, twinkle, little star, how I wonder what you are; yet one thing I plainly see, you don’t give a d—n for me. Up above the world so high, like a diamond in the sky; but the diamonds that I wear, can be soaked while you slay there. While the rent is falling due, even with the falling dew; you shine like a diamond set, while I hustle, fume and fret. Tell me, in your lofty sphere, are things ordered better there? Do you have your “high-ice” summers; rents, and trusts, and honest plumbers? Are your folks as mad as we of this globe of land and sea? Do they race for wealth and fame, and find at last a grave-yard name? You arc wise and I am witty, and it really seems a pity that we cannot ruminate together on the ways of fate. We welcome to the local journalistic field the Honorable William E. Cameron, who lately assumed the editorship of the Virginian-Pilot. The author of the matter that h?is lately graced the editorial page of our contemporary is a writer who must be treated with...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
x
Loading...
x
x