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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1984

Genealogy Dear Mountain Laurel Staff, I think your paper is one of the best. No bad news, just wonderful stories. I look forward every month to the next issue. I know your paper reaches out to a lot of readers, so I hope someone out there can help me. I'm trying to locate the relatives of James L. and Hula Port is. It seems someone put a new stone on their graves. He was my grandfather, John Portis's brother and has been dead for years. It may have been grandchildren, etc. My uncle Walter Portis in Lexington, North S-12 Nice brick & frame home located on Panarama Dr. in Chalet High, Fancy Gap, Va. Living room, family room, 2 fi replaces, 3 bed,.m '; rooms, 2% baths, kitclien/dining. Deck around most house, double garage, paved drive. 1 bath, kitchen", great roan, deck, privacy. ~ •*. '•' Asking $29,500. * J-60 A-Frame cabin &10 acres in Floyd County "" Pfnd S^>^ t Ve^^ ICnE E-51 75 acres located off Hwy 221 North of „, . , _ •.1 i . ~. approx. AO a...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1984

Page 14 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1984 ALL ABOUT OCIE BY: TOOTSIE CASSELL PILSON In the year 1904, Ocie Conner Hill was born in the home of her grandparents, John and Martha Hylton. Her parents Jeff and Lou Howell had four children. They spent several years living with Ocie's grandparents, before moving into a home of their own. This house was situated back in the face of the.mountain behind Conner's View Church in Patrick County. With a memory sharp as a tack, Ocie carried me way, way back in time. Here is what she told me "The house we lived in," she said, "Consisted of the big house with living and sleeping quarters. The kitchen was a separate building out back. It was a log structure with one window. It also had a shutter window, which we raised in the surrmer time." "The big house and kitchen were joined together by a grape arbor," she said, "and we could walk under this and never get wet when it was raining. When clusters of grapes hung from this it was a sight to behold." "Grand...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1984

GEORGE De HART Friend of the Birds by Ivalien Hylton Belcher George DeHart of Floyd County is a man living close to nature. He has been interested in birds most of his life. How many of you remember the cards we used to get with the pictures of different kind of birds on them? I remember them very well and wish I had kept the ones I had collected. George studied these cards and learned a lot about birds. He loves their songs and thinks the world would be a sad place to live without birds. On his farm, George says he has seen between 40 and 50 different types of birds. There's a bird feeder for them to enjoy, especially in the cold, snowy weather. Around the bird feeder, there always seems to be a lot of Blue Jays. About a year ago, an unusual bird was spotted on the DeHart farm. It was an evening Cross Beak, from the north. They are rarely seen in this area. The colors are very pretty - yellow, black head and wliite on their back. 1 W Located just off the Blue Ridge Parkway (mile po...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1984

Page 16 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1984 TELEPHONE READER INTERVIEWS Each: month we call people who send us their phone number and write this column from those ? "chats". This way we get to meet more people and share their wonderful stories with our readers. ANNE CONNER CHECK, VIRGINIA Mrs. Anne Conner lives in Check, Virginia, in Floyd County. She is 85 years old but she still loves gardening. Her roots run deep in Floyd County. She said her great-grandparents who she has been told were Dutch, were there. Her greatgrandmother's last name was Byrd. When her parents were married, her grandparents gave them (and each of their children) BO acres of land. Anne and her sister, Cassie were raised there. She lives now near her homeplace, "between two creeks". Anne Conner also likes to save seed for her garden each year. There was one old timey bean she described that she doesn't have anymore. She said she would love to have enough seed of it to just plant a hill or two, just to see them grow ag...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1984

MONROE TIPTON ON FISHING BY MONROE TIPTON I would like to tell you about some fishing trips I have been on. First I will talk about Trout fishing. I remember I was on Burks Fork near Herman Kemp's place. There was a woman fishing up above me. It was rather steep there. Anyway, it came up a shower of rain. She put her umbrella up, which she held in one hand, her fishing rod in the other. I saw her get a good strike. At the same time both feet slipped out from under her. The umbrella went one way and the rod and reel, the other. She fell plumb down in the mud and slipped in the creek up to her knees. Well, when she got out, I never heard such talk from a woman in my life. I didn't wait around long for I knew I would have to laugh and I was afraid she might flog me with her fishing rod. Another time, I was fishing in New River near Paradise Point, which is near Allisonia, Va. Some man caught a 21 inch brown sucker. He didn't know what he had caught. About that time Steve Marshall came ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1984

Page 18 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 198 A THE WOOD WEAVER OF PIKE CITY An errant chromosome too minute to even cast a shadow under an electric microscope had somehow become detached or rearranged on the string of nucleic acid particules of embryonic life and ordained that Walter Young would be an exceptional human being. His three brothers were of average height and looks and possessed with some mechanical and managerial ability. One held a responsible position with the Norfolk and Western Railroad; another could design, build and operate saw mills. A third brother achieved some notority in the Laurel Fork-Bankstown-Pike City triangle by somehow attaching a belt-driven airplane propeller to the front of his Model T Ford. It gave him the speed he sought alright, but it also created enough lift to render the steering mechanism of his.jQrd useless, thus hurling the quivering vehicle and its passengers into a rail fence and briar patch. He soon went back to his research and thereafter design...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1984

"MY ONLY DOLL" By: Mae Clifton I was born June 4, at Vesta, Virginia, in Patrick County. My parents lived in a two room log house near the head waters of Smith River, mountains on every side. There were no roads to travel, only a narrow path through the wilderness either way. I had one brother four years older than I. When I was six years old, I remember Mother and Dad talking about Santa Claus. Someway I got interested and ask them who was Santa Claus and where did he live. Naturally they knew the babble that children were told that day and time, about Santa coming down the chimney and we had to be real smart or he would not bring us anything. That was several days before Christmas, so I tried to be real smart. I helped my brother carry in wood and feed the dog, which we loved very much. It was like one of the family. It slept under the floor up next to the fireplace in cold weather. It lay beside the hen's nest of eggs and did not bother an egg. There was a loose plank in the floo...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1984

Page 20 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1984 THE FLOYD WAGONS By: Gladys Edwards Willis Cross Roads is a little corrinunity in Franklin County that got its name because it is located at the point where the road that is now known as Route 40 crosses 640. When I was growing up there in the early 1930'5, the roads were unpaved and we called them the Ferrum road and the Henry road, because that is where they took us in one direction and the other direction of either road would take you to Shooting Creek. I always had the impression that Shooting Creek was as far as you could go. The world mysteriously ended there! If you could get that far on the rutty red clay mountain trails. Very few automobiles did make it in those days. One of my earliest memories is the sight of caravans of covered wagons slowly winding their way down the curvy mountain side bringing cabbage. It was an event we looked forward to every fall and caused great excitement. It was the only time we had a fresh vegetable from mid-...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1984

mmsamm N. Locust St. FLOYD; VA 24091 Jvf^vC j Hours: 8-5:30 Monday-Saturday Phone 745-2822 HI ■ m flHv ( ■ mm bshihbib QUALITY LOG HOMES AT AFFORDABLE PRICES The Beautiful, Natural Way To Live THE SHAWNEE IMPROVED ±£&P>'l&£k : LOG HOME PACKAGE "[ ljai fill ||l • H uttig "AR MA-SEAL" fepj ]io^'''s*'' ' • Ridge Beam and Snow Blocks •" THE LEXINGTON . Gasketing 24' x 40' 2 STORY 1920 SQ. FT. I B?ueS s SpikeS The Lexington offers room for families, room for entertaining and * our Hours of Building room for guests. The Lexington covers an overall area of 1920 Supervision square feet and features four bedrooms on the second floor, two OPTIONS: baths, and a spacious living room. The long front porch promises • Dormers Of Any Length room to relax and enjoy the great outdoors. For those who require • Storm Doors additional room, a larger version of The Lexington is available. • Erection Crew information available upon request Send $4.00 (Check or Money orde...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1984

Page 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1984 HENRY HARRIS Continued from page 1. Henry did some trading with Tom Boyd and got a farm at Claudville, in Patrick County. He and Mattie had two girls and one boy in the next six wonderful years. They worked hard and had a young peach orchard that was just starting to bear at that time. Henry had cut alot of timber and had it stacked to take to Stuart and sell. It was worth about $3,000.00. Those were happy, successful, loving years, then suddenly, tradedy struck. Mattie had to be rushed to the hospital in Stuart and operated on for appendicitis. The children were rushed to relatives. Mattie was operated on at 9:00 at night and Henry stayed with her until she woke up the next morning. As Henry was leaving the hospital, a friend came up to him with a troubled look on his face. He said he hated to tell Henry, but last night there was a fire that destroyed Henry's whole farm. It burned the house, barn, the lumber and the peach orchard - everything. Al...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1984

HENRY HARRIS Continued from page 22. he would get to take off his shoes. Then Henry's son, George was born. Henry said, "me and my son have been partners since the day he was born. What's mine is his and his is mine." Once when George was a small boy, Henry and Mae were share cropping Tump Spongier's bottom land. Henry came in from the fields about noon and laid down in the grass. George came up and wanted Henry to play. Henry told Goerge to let him rest, that he was tired. George told his father, "when I'm big and you're little, I'll work and play with you." Mae said that George has come pretty close to keeping that promise. "He's always stuck beside his father and looked after us these last few years." Henry has had some wild experiences in his lifetime. When he was a boy, his family lived near the Lybrook place at Meadows of Dan. One day several people were sitting on the fence around one of the Lybrook pastures and a big mean prize bull walked up. Henry was dared to ride him. He...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1984

Meadows of Dan, HEARTOF THE BLUE RIDGE 'fib jLaurel '•vV N AV 'H W«W r IT* L "" <i Q Copyr ighl 1983 Mouniom lourel / Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life Page 24 A self-guided monthly tour of Mountain Backroads our tour, the upper end of the pond can be seen. 04.1 This pretty comnunity is Vesta, Virginia. The Vesta Post Office is on our right. Just past the post office, we turn right onto state road 636. 05.6 Here we will turn left onto state road 637- After we turn, there are signs of an old building on the right. This was once the old Free Union School. 06.2 This beautiful farm on our right is home to Mr. and Mrs. Pate Lawson. They were selling milk and homemade butter when our son, Billy, was born and Mrs. Lawson' s rich whole milk filled all his baby bottles. The memory of her butter over a hot biscuit still makes my mouth water. 06.6 At this stop sign, we will cross state road 639 and continue straight ahead on state road 647. 07. 5 This beautiful trout stream is Ivy Cr...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1984

MAY, 1984 lYloiithk Journal ( M Mountain Lif«» HOW AN APPLE PIE ASSISTED CUPID Grandma lived at a time when a juicy, crisp-crusted homemade pie broke down a man's resistance to matrimony a heap sight easier than a pretty face or a pretty dress. She always said it was her apple pie and not her looks that led Grandpa into popping the question and getting hitched up. "We'd been keepin' company for close to a year," she once told my mother, "and Rufus hadn't so much as hinted marriage when he come to the house one Sunday for dinner and I brought an apple pie to the table and Ma told him I had baked it. "He told Ma he was mighty fond of apple pie. I remember he ate two pieces and said it was the best apple pie he ever ate. That evenin' he asked me to marry him. Said seein' as how I could make a good apple pie, he reckoned I was the girl for him." Grandpa never had occasion to rue the day. For Grandma kept him happy for 60 years. She kept him happy with her cooking. Especially with her ho...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1984

Page 2 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1984 SURPRISE FOR MOM "REEKS" WITH MISCffIEF "Hey Mom, look at what we've got." This excited announcement triggered a warning on my mother's consciousness. The sudden droop of her shoulders and soft, involuntary sigh that slipped from her throat betrayed the fact that she was bracing herself for the unacceptable. (After all, nothing good had ever come to her that had been preceeded by this tone of triumph.) With an air of total resignation, she turned from the stove where she was stirring gravy in the big, cast iron skillet, to stare in disbelief at the apparation in the middle of her kitchen. As the full impact of what she was seeing began to register on her mind, Mom's eyes took on a glassy, hypnotised look. Her mouth fell open and made a few feeble motions, as if she were trying to speak and yet not a sound came from her lips. For several painful minutes she just stood and looked at us. Then, with the unattached movements of a sleepwalker, Mom staggere...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1984

MOUNTAIN MEMORIES Being the oldest of six children, I had to change, feed, bathe and rock babies for as far back as I can remember. I never got to play like the other kids and when I did get a few minutes or hours, I got as far away from the house as I possibly could. I loved to build a play house of my very own. I would sweep a patch of ground real clean and lay off the rooms with small stones layed around every room. Then, with moss I would make the beds and with stone, I would make my stove. Snuff box lids were my pots and pans and dishes. I baked many mud pies and cakes. But I didn't want any babies to cry or mess up my beds. I swore to myself over and over I would never have any kids when I grew up and got married. But, I had three of my own and a bunch more who call me their man. I was "Mama's little helper" always. Everytime I hear a baby cry until this day, I can hear my mama's voice calling, "Hazel, come get this youngin"'. When I was a little girl I really hated those word...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1984

Page 4 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1984 Mwii Jjfl In January The Mountain Laurel received a letter from Mrs. Taylor S. Brown of Rocky Mount, Virginia, asking it we would consider doing a story in the future about a lady who had just passed away. That lady was Miss Elizabeth Thomas. Mrs. Brown said, "I have known her in the past 15 years of her life and she was a super human person." We try to follow up on any request our readers make for stories, and in this case, there was so much to be found. I never had the pleasure of knowing Elizabeth Thomas, but all the sources I contacted painted a picture of a woman that led her entire life selflessly, only wishing to be of help to others. I wish to thank Mrs. Vera Stanley of Meadows of Dan for contributing her writings on Miss Thomas and Mrs. Nelson Thomas, Elizabeth's sister-in-law, for sending information and a copy of Elizabeth's own writings. They paint a vivid picture of a woman whose lifetime was filled with faith, courage and unselfishness ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1984

GROWING UP ON TOGGLES CREEK My dad used to ride around his (mail) route thinking of things he wanted done on the farm. If it didn't require hired hands, he just hinted to mother what he wanted done. One time, for instance, the frost bit the ends of the blades of corn on about a two acre cornfield. Dad thought the blades should be cut off with scissors, so Mother dutifully attempted the task. The blades didn't grow out one bit but I guess the cornfield looked a little neater to Dad. Another time, Mother took all us kids to the John Blackard place, at Dad's request, to strip clover seed from the dried up blooms. Cleaned clover seed was selling then for about twenty dollars a bushel. However, the seed is very tiny and I doubt if the bushel of chaff we laboriously gathered would yeild more than a pint of clean clover seed. Mother believed in cleanliness as much as anyone, but in her mind, I think she believed that "Friendliness is next to Godliness" and cleanliness had to come in third....

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1984

Page 6 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1984 TELEPHONE READER INTERVIEWS Each month we call people v*ho send us their phone timber and write this column from those "chats". This way we get to meet more people and share their wonderful stories with our readers. LB. WILLIPORD HILLSVILLE, VA When we received a subscription from A.B. and Rosa Williford of Hillsville, Virginia, I was pleased to see they had included their phone number for our reader interviews because the envelope it came in intrigued me. It said, "Rest and Be Thankful Farm". % curiosity was answered when I talked to A.B. Williford. He said his ancesters were Scottish and he had been to Scotland during the war. Since then, he and his wife have made three trips to Scotland and enjoyed them very much. He said, "The Scotts are a kind, gracious people." While there, they visited a number of places. One place in the high steep countryside was a hiking trail. It has a mid-point called, "Rest and Be Thankful". They even put a bench there a...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1984

PINTO BEANS There was a time when no matter What else was on the daily menu, you could always expect pinto beans. Country folks have been known to buy them by the hundred pound sack (if they didn 1 1 grow them) in the fall of the year to last their family through the winter. Patsy Stoneman, daughter of the famous "Pop" Stoneman of old time country music, wrote a song, "Prayers and Pinto Beans". She was one of a large family and says that's what they were raised on - prayers and pinto beans. Pinto beans are more than a tradition, they're an institution, a way of life. No one ever cooks a small amount. When you cook pinto beans, you cook a lot. They 1 re meant to last for more than one meal and are re-heated until the last one is gone. Most people agree they get better the more they're warmed up. The "soup" gets thick and many people prefer this "soup" spooned over hot biscuits or, cornbread than the beans themselves . There's an art to cooking pinto beans right and here's how, accord...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1984

Page 8 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1984 COAL MINING IN THE 20 S By:T.R.Rorrer Lots of people used to go to West Virginia to work in the mines. Few people visit the mines and have no idea what they are like. Back in the 1940'5, I gave a program at the Madison, North Carolina Rotary Club covering how coal was mined around 1920. (The following is a typed transcript of that program.) Last week C.P. telephoned and asked me to take the program for Thursday. I immediately thought of something very important for Thursday and told him I couldn't make it but would take the program some other time. He said, "Good, we'll book you for next Thursday." For the past week I have planned to come to Stoneville and felt very much like the fellow going to town. A friend of mine met him and asked him where he was going. He said he was going to town and, "everytime I go to town I get just as drunk as can be. Gosh, how I do dread it." I told C.P. it scared the hell out of me just to think about trying to speak. H...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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