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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1988

October, 1988 New lobbyist working with Farm Bureau #v 1 I' y> Kay Nichols Peanuts, flue-cured tobacco promising By NORM HYDE VFBF Staff Writer RICHMOND—The Virginia Agricultural Statistics Service estimates Virginia farmers could see record peanut yields this fall, as high as 3,200 pounds per acre if good weather holds through harvest. Production is forecast at 314 million pounds. That's the one bright spot in a report estimating crop conditions as of Sept. 1, although other crops are also seeing adequate yields, thanks to timely rains this summer. Aides see, hear, taste ag industry Continued from Page 3 tested by coyotes twice," he joked. Coyotes infest area The first kill, May said, resulted in the death of about 45 to 50 lambs over a twomonth period. The second resulted in 22 lost lambs in one week. "We are in an area infested with coyotes." Coyotes, May said, kill for the thrill, not for the food. Stopping the attacks is difficult because the cunning coyote literally...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1988

6 Virginia man on American soybean slate CARSON—Dinwiddie County soybean farmer Merle "Buck" McCann was elected vice president of the American Soybean Association at the Aug. 9 Annual Soybean Expo in St. Louis. He was elected by the 43 farmers who make up the association's national board of directors. These farmers represent soybean farmers in the 29 states that are affiliated with the ASA. The board also elected James Lee Adams Jr. of Georgia as president for 1988-89. Other officers are: Marlyn Jorgensen of lowa, first vice president; vice presidents Gary Riedel of Missouri, Ralph Raber of Illinois and Ted Johnson of Alabama; Robert Utz of Ohio, secretary; and Dale Roberds of Kansas, treasurer. Wayne Bennett of Arkansas, retiring president, will serve as chairman. The association, a farmer-controlled, non-profit commodity organization, conducts programs to promote profitable soybean production for U.S. farmers through research, education and promotion. Some Virginia farmworkers due...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1988

October, 1988 Field Day gave glimpse of VSU strides Continued from Page 1 long tour of the Randolph Research Farm at VCU Aug. 30, said together USDA and schools like Virginia State can solve the problems of agriculture and rural America, where most people in the nation have roots. A task force including five presidents of 1890 colleges and five USDA people is looking at ways to strengthen relations USDA has with those colleges and is making recommendations. Also, a USDA person will be stationed on every 1890 campus as a liaison. Then, help will be provided with student recruiting, securing jobs for graduating students and in research, said Myers. He applauded the work being done at VSU to provide education in "alternative enterprises" such as raising hybrid striped bass, shiitake mushrooms, dried flowers, elephant garlic and other commodities that are not traditional farm products. VSU's exploration and education into the possibility of raising these products for profit tie in with ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1988

8 Congressional candidates ansv The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation recently posed several agricultural questions to all Virginia candidates for the U.S. Senate and House in the Nov. 8 election. This month, the Farm Bureau News prints the responses of the contested candidates who replied to the questionnaires by the Sept. 8 deadline. Next month, the answers of uncontested candidates Rep. Thomas J. Bliley (R) of Richmond for the Third District and Rep. Norman Sisisky (D) of Petersburg for the Fourth District will be printed. Senate candidates Charles S. Robb (D) of McLean and Maurice A. Dawkins (R) of Arlington did not respond. House candidates Rep. French Slaughter Jr. (R) of Culpeper for the Seventh District and Charles R. Hawkins (R) candidate of Chatham in the Fifth District replied but did not answer the specific questions. Other candidates are: First District: James S. Ellenson (D) of Newport News and Rep. Herbert H. Bateman (R) of Grafton; Second District: Rep. Owen B. Pickett...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1988

October, 1988 vr farm issues survey OLIN: I have been supportive of the U.S. proposal to G ATT that all farm subsidies be phased-out over a 10-year period; that European Community, in patricular, has virtually ignored that proposal. Even so, our export enhancement programsestablished to counter European subsidies—have gotten the attention of the EC, and I am hopeful that we can begin to move toward a fairer international marketplace for our agricultural goods. I support the U.S./Canadian Free Trade Agreement, believing that it opens a great opportunity for economic benefits between these two major trading partners and that it may prove to be a model for bilateral trade agreements we might negotiate with other partners. Our U.S. Trade Representative, Clayton Yeutter, has done a fine job of representing our interests. I was very involved, as a co-chairman of the Congressional Beef Caucus, in pressing for an agreement with Japan to allow more highgrade American beef and citrus into Jap...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1988

10 farm issues survey Continued from Page 9 SMITH ment in full" by hospitals and physicians, and make nursing home care part of the Catastrophic Health Care bill via amendment or have the Congress, GSA, or OMB devise a framework to implement a national health care policy. WOLF: A comprehensive approach is needed to control health care costs. We must consider health insurance regulation reform, tax incentives for employers and employees to encourage economical and comprehensive coverage, and programs to assist states and the private sector in providing health care services and encourage competition among health care providers. 7 Hundreds of growers experience • harassment from federal Legal Service Corporation attorneys through frivolous law suits, political activism, etc. What do you recommend, through legislation and agency rules, to alleviate this problem? BATEMAN: While my opponent is a former rural legal aid attorney, I would support eliminating corporation funding in order to c...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1988

October, 1988 § Here's A Farm Bureau Service That Cam Cut Your Prescription Costs In Half Now Enjoy Savings, Convenience And FREE Home Delivery jjjTTfljß With Feld Prescription Service For Farm Bureau Members BRpSgßißl CONVENIENCE. You can order hy mail or, for even faster SERVICE. Most prescriptions are filled within 24 hours and 8888881 service, call our special toll-free number. delivered within 72 hours right to your door. SAVINGS. Through volume purchasing and generic choices, Feld Drug can cut your prescription costs by up to 50% and TO ORDER, CALL Ol'R IOLL-FREE NUMBER: M . . 1-800-228-3353 ——————————■ QUALITY. Feld sells only top-quality prescription items from nationally known, licensed firms in compliance with the Use this toll-free number to order any item listed. If you don't U.S. Food and Drug Administration standards. see what you need — please call and ask. This is only a partial SAVE UP TO £2% Qjy XJfESE I SAFETY. For your protection Feld pharmacists maintain cus- li...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1988

12 IF YOU CAN ANSWER YES TO THESE FIVE QUESTIONS, YOU MAY SAVE $500 OR MORE IN MEDICAL EXPENSES. 1. Do you show your current Blue Cross and Blue Shield membership card each time you receive health care services? Doing this lets your doctor or hospital know that your Farm Bureau Program requires that anytime you're hospitalized, your admission must be reviewed by Blue Cross and Blue Shield. Hospital Admission Review helps you avoid out-of-pocket costs for unnecessary days of hospital care. If your admission is not reviewed, you must pay the first $500 in covered services. This is in addition to your inpatient deductible and any non-covered expenses. B gtou.no JIT 423 07/01/88 I ■ 81830003 I COB Richmond. l 2. Did you know that if your doctor recommends a hospital stay, you or your doctor must call Blue Cross and Blue Shield in advance of your admission? If you're unable to make the call yourself, you may ask a friend, family member or your doctor to call for you. Remember, Blue Cross...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1988

October, 1988 Reasonable pesticide use economically essential Continued from Page 7 in an investigative report in the "Roanoke Times and World-News" newspaper. Ashworth said the Farm Bureau would welcome more state attention to many problems related to pesticide use, particularly disposal of empty containers or banned chemicals. "Farmers and rural Virginians are also concerned about pesticide problems," Ashworth said. "After all, they 're the ones who get sick Biochemistry building gets new old name BLACKSBURG—Virginia Tech's Biochemistry building has been renamed Engel Hall in honor of professor emeritus Reuben W. Engel, the first department head of biochemistry and nutrition. A resolution by the university's board Racing pros, cons given Virginia has a lottery. Is pari-mutuel horse racing to come? On Nov. 8, voters will decide. The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation does not have a position on the issue but has contacted an opponent and an advocate of pari-mutuel betting for their vi...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1988

14 An apple a day—the Virginia October way October is National Apple Month. And right now one of Virginia's favorite crops is being harvested in orchards around the state. These apples are destined for grocery stores all over the Eastern United States and Europe. Virginia harvests nearly 11 million bushels of apples a year, making it the sixth largest apple producing state in the country. It's estimated that our apples and associated industries contribute $150 million to the state's economy every year, says the Virginia State Apple Board. In addition to apples sold fresh in nature's convenient wrapper, many Virginia apples are processed into such popular products as apple juice, apple cider, applesauce, apple pie filling, apple butter and other products. Apples are one of the healthiest foods Catfish Farmers form new fish association By NORM HYDE VFBF Staff Writer NOTTOWAY COURT HOUSEAbout 10 catfish farmers from Nottoway and surrounding counties met Sept. 7 to organize a new associ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1988

October, 1988 SERVICES OFFERED DIAMONDS BY APPOINTMENT AND SAVE! Below retail prices. Appraisal and photo included. Richardson's Jewelry. 804-740-7341 LANDSCAPE PLANTING & DESIGN, TREE TRIMMING, YARD CARE, CLEAN-UPS, HAULING. BOBBY NEWTON (703) 937-5951 LEAD TEST with bottle, information, $15. AQUA-AIR LABORATORIES, Box 4006, Charlottesville, VA 22903 Mechanic will service heavy equipment, farm machinery, travels to 5ite.(703)872-3411, Bill Luck, Bumpass, Va CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONING SALE - All sizes installed and guaranteed. Roanoke, Botetourt, Bedford counties. (703) 977-4626 Aldridge's Saw & Tool Sharpening Service. Seven miles south of Petersburg on U.S. 1 (804) 733-8009 STATELINE IRRIGATION, SALES & SERVICE. Hwy 52 South, Cana VA (703) 755-4321 FREE COLLEGE GRANT MONEY! SCHOLARSHIPS, LOANS. BILLIONS AVAILABLE. GUARANTEE EVERYONE APPLYING QUALIFIES FOR FIVE FINANCIAL SOURCES. MOST RECEIVE OVER TWENTY. SEND $3 (REFUNDABLE) FOR BROCHURE, INSTRUCT...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1988

Farm Bureau HE-* I fep^«|SffiMgs- l & y »• sj? !%.** 'SmWkStl * "lOWr^Bßrß^^^^^^^^MßslwfL iinW^^r'jff'^F? l^il^M^^^^^^^^^^^Bß!HFMßMi ■ •I• 11 -t?.** ft^?S!;M ? - t ',*■' oJK^IHPKPv)' h V */ % ; v •' ifl ByMHWi HP^KfS^jy^pj >m M jfl W 1 X ■ Li Ml / I Jjf *_jor -, gmSWmm iSSi | I * " - 1 |L '* m * jj|| V W)\ fc A ■ m ■ \ < •" *-' ■■ flexible than be adapted may choose a II Bureau IPSw tp wt up And enjoy * - ■ if BBIHM Mi 11 1 i i ll 1 1 'iI'WWBIIIWMIiHWiIl ili F 'MIIIBM— ililWlii 11 IHHI— I—iilii 1111 - Mmm In the back of his truck. Flippen displayed different varieties of dug peanut plants and mother curious crop to the riders — cotton. A big red peanut combine parked nearby also attracted attention. Behind these displays on Route 633 at the G. B. Ligon and Son Farm sat what was Virginia s last operating cotton gin until it closed four years ago. lace used to be everything," said retired gir.ner and <tof«!{scmG.s}, ligon His son sells farm...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1988

w 9 Hi H EMBMf Hp MS, w mm rafßß w V ! i S£ 4 _L Vol. 47, No. 11 Commodity Day Events to draw VFBF producers By GREG HICKS VFBF Director of Communications RICHMOND—In an effort to introduce more producer members to the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Annual Convention, this year's opening day will have a new twist. It will serve as the first yearly "Commodity Appreciation Day" and will be. for the most part, dedicated to the producers of Virginia's commodities, while kicking off the entire convention. The 1988 Annual Convention runs from Nov. 28 to Dec. 1 at the Marriott Hotel in historic downtown Richmond. Day-long activites will be highlighted by a keynote luncheon address from former U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Earl L. Butz. Planned around Butz's remarks are eight informative commodity conferences and the opening of various farm organization and equipment dealer exhibits. "We'd like to bring in some of our pro- Tests approved for Virginia swine and eggs By NORM HYDE VFBF Staff ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1988

2 Pesticide study can't happen overnight The issue of pesticide application is as emotional and controversial as it is complex. More and more Virginia en- vironmental groups are locking horns with the agricultural and home pesticide industries, as well as with homeowners. Their concerns are commendable, and all Virginia farmers agree that more can be done to improve the safe and proper use of applied chemicals. Farming is the most dangerous occupation in America. And pesticides are one reason why. Therefore, farmers are obviously interested in safer products, more complete user information and a strong education program for handling, mixing and application. After all, we're the ones who suffer when over-exposed to farm chemicals or when well water is contaminated by improperly applied pesticides. But farmers also are concerned about six recent "scoping meetings" conducted statewide by a special committee of the Council on the Environment. These meetings leave the agricultural indust...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1988

November, 1988 Last month the answers to a Virginia Farm Bureau Federation farm issues survey of U.S. congressionsl candidates were printed for all contested candidates who responded. Below are the unedited replies of un-challenged representatives Thomas J. Bliley (R-Richmond) of the Third District and Norman Sisisky IDPetersburg) of the Fourth District: 1 Three major types of farm • program legislation are most often discussed for 1990: a continuation of the 1985 farm program with minor modifications, a government controlled supply- management program, and a new concept called decoupling. Which type of farm program do you favor for 1990 and why? jml „ BLILEY BLILEY: I have felt that we should reintroduce the elementary principle of supply and demand into this nation's agriculture policy. I feel that we should take a hard look at carefully timed withdrawal of subsidies and an increased reliance on the free market system. Of course, any changes should recognize long-term investment a...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1988

4 Pork Checkoff wins in vote By KATHY BUTLER VFBF News Editor DES MOINES—The 100 Percent Pork Checkoff in an early September referendum passed nationwide by a 77.5 percent margain, according to the USD A. Of the 44,953 votes cast, 34,836 were for continuing the checkoff and 10,117, or 22.5 percent, were against. The checkoff provides money for promotion, consumer education and research programs that are vital to the pork industry. Of Virginia's 392 votes, 323 were for the checkoff and 69 were against; five were invalid. The checkoff was defeated in only six counties or municipalities in Virginia, noted John Parker, project director for the Virginia Pork Industry Board. "We're really pleased with the vote," said Parker. "It was a bad time to get people to the polls because they were active with peanuts and tobacco" in a large part of the state. Under the 100 percent Pork Checkoff, which went into effect Nov. 1, 1986, producers contribute 25 cents of every $100 received when a hog is ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1988

November, 1988 Farm Bureau addresses pesticide study By NORM HYDE VFBF Staff Writer RlCHMOND—Virginia Farm Bureau Federation members were crucial participants in a series of six public "scoping" sessions held across the state in September by a study committee of the Virginia Council on the Environment. At the final hearing Oct. 5 at the State Capitol, VFBF board member Spottswood Taliaferro Jr. testified that Virginia farmers are careful users of pesticides. "For instance, there's been wide acceptability and adoption of integrated pest management and best management practices by Virginia farmers, all designed to Year End Closeout You Save Thousands! We Guarantee Results CROP STORAGE C LIVESTOCK C WAREHOUSES C SHOPS l~ EQUIPMENT For a limited time, you can enjoy special savings on selected models of our quality steel buildings. Simple, fast construction, straight sides Sizes 10' wide — 100' wide, any length Buy factory direct, and save! No Sales Charge • Easy Access To Your Money Fre...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1988

6 IMMIGRATION REFORM AND CONTROL ACT: Facts for Employers The IMMIGRATION REFORM AND CONTROL ACT OF 1986 limits the availability of employment to U.S. citizens and authorized aliens. The intent of the law is to reduce illegal immigration by restricting employment opportunities. Requirements Of The Law • Hire only U.S. citizens or aliens authorized to work in the U.S. • Complete an 1-9 form for each employee hired after November 6, 1986, including U.S. citizens. • Keep 1-9 forms on file in your office for three years after each person is hired, or for one year after an employee stops working for you, whichever is later. The forms must be available for inspection on request by INS officials. • Do NOT fire or refuse to hire anyone because they look or sound "foreign." Sanctions • From June 1, 1987 until May 31, 1988 employers were given a warning if they broke the law, but they were not fined for a first offense. • An employer who knowingly hires unauthorized aliens may be fined as fol...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1988

November, 1988 VFBF Convention 1988 Nov. 28-Dec. 1 Producers are focus first day Continued from page 1 Environmental Concerns" to "Market Access In An Era of Structural Change In the Livestock Industry." Conference speakers have been drawn from Virginia Tech, the USD A, the Virginia Cooperative Extension Service, the Virginia Department of Forestry, the American Farm Bureau Federation, the Tobacco Institute, Philip Morris USA, the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, the North Carolina Farm Bureau Federation, Smithfield Foods Inc., the Virginia Peanut Growers Association and the Virginia-Carolina Peanut Farmers Cooperative Association. (See below for full Commodity Conferences schedule). In addition, more than 30 exhibitors representing every Virginia commodity will be available to answer questions. "This is shaping up to be one of the best conferences we've ever had," Ashworth added. 'There is a wealth of information here for every kind of producer in Virginia....

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1988

8 VFBF voting process like electoral college The state voting process of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, like the organization's other methods, works from the grassroots level. It begins in each of the 88 counties. County boards select producer members (farmers) to represent that county on voting matters for the Annual Convention. Similar to the U.S. electoral college in 9 JH Ikujr] n * *1 J| B' - lißr 4 % m m 1 ai ■p ' |* rs iL i n : A voting delegates' handbook provides information on candidates and issues. (File photo) Election includes six board seats Continued from Page 7 and state Farm Bureau committees. A former Cooperative Extension agent for Gloucester County, Jenkins started farming in 1963. He has taught school in Brunswick and Nottoway counties. Also, he has worked for Brown and Williamson Tobacco Co. as supervisor of tobacco production in Venuezela. Jenkins is past president of the Dundas Ruritan Club. A native of Lunenburg County, Jenkins graduated from Virginia T...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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