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Title: Western Age Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 52,784 items from Western Age, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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HIGH TREASON CHARGE. EX-GERMAN CONSUL ON TRIAL. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 28 November 1914

HIGH TREASON CHARGE. EX-GERMAN CONSUL ON TRIAL. The former German Consul at Sunderland, Ado'Ph A1-lers, was nt Sunderland ?5?i » y Iast month committed for ? If xt assizes on a charge of high trea Bon. No ball was asked for. Mr- Travers Humphreys, who appeared for tho Public Prosecutor, said tho accused Was born In Hamburg, but hernmn n .. .. t...... Huo.i British subject in 1905. When Great Britain „w:-r against Germany ho resigned ill consulate, but on tho following two days „! arranged for tho departure of a number of Gorman reservists in tho district. He somo who had no deslro to i.itb0li' who refused. Docu KnSonim' ov °,ffico sl'°wed ho had paid travi.Ulnt, expenses In at least 20 cases. nS i' «?one,r ,lrst charged under tha ' ljut on tho case being ' submitted to tho Attorney-Genera] the )at S iV'''ccutlori for high treason. For the defence It was urged that the of lf.„an.y- w;nB PU'ely technical and com mitted inadvertently through an excess of zeal in performing his duties. ...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FAVORITE LESSONS. NEW INTEREST FOR BOYS. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 28 November 1914

FAVORITE LESSONS. NEW INTEREST FOR BOYS. Geography has become the fuvoritu lesson in the re-assembled London County Council schools. A master in one of them turned his back on the war map tho other day and asked, 'Who are the Allies?' Every arm shot up and the four nations' names came back in volume* 'Who is the enemy?' 'Germany'— with a roar. 'No— no. Who Is the real enemy?' The Kaiser'— tho hated namo exploded from them like shrapnel. 'What would you The answer came back in shattering salvos, loung London had no illusions as to tho 1 ;'Jtllor ol Europe's agony, 'Hang him!' o*2!Uite — a humanitarian suggested ot. Helena, and a dozen young faces glow ered at him— a young local patriot boomed . e ^eSe't's Canal!' and was echoed with laughing acclamation. then the master took to qulck-ftrlng. 'Who is In command of our troops?' 'Who Is Admiral of our Fleet?' (How 'Jelllcoe' can thunder from young throats!) And then the last question — 'How many of you boys have relatives In our Army?' ...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"WHO GOES THERE?" LONDON A GARRISON TOWN. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 28 November 1914

'WHO GOES THERE?' LONDON A GARRISON TOWN. London Is becoming u garrison town. In the very heart of the city you will tinil sen tries guarding the General Post Office, whose basement and llrst-tloor windows are care fully covered with botnb-proof netting. If you are wlso you will not attempt to examine this bomb-proof netting too closely. The old army challenge, 'Halt! Who goes there?' unknown to civilian oars until a few days ago, is now becoming familiar. At flrst men were Inclined to Ignore it. Some of thnm Innkorl nn If T ♦V.lr.b- na n Mn.l _.itt tnry game. But when they found that tho unanswered challenge was followed by u rifle bullet, and the rifle bullet. If necesary, fol lowed by a bayonet thrust, there was no more neglecting tho sentries. Two platelayers were going to work early In the morning recently at Wlllcsden. A sentry challenged them. They walked on Indifferently. A bullet took ofT tho ear ot one man and went through tho hair of tho second. Then they stopped! A young...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LATEST FASHION. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 28 November 1914

LATEST FASHION.. . In light, eool materials this summer tlio coat ami .skirt costume .scorns to bo tho favourite mode for street wear. Many quaint, yet becom ing designs owe their origin to the national costumes of the Kuropean mf.ions — the bolero, for instance, hails front .Switzerland, Austria and Norway, yet it figures prominently in many Australian dresses to-day. The nowly- i arrived 'capo coat' is suggestive of Irelaud, 1 thu swathed sash with its jaunty side stream* ers fo Spain. There is nothing Continental, However, in the stylish coat and skirt illustrated above. It is a charming combination of plaiu and silk taffetas.

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
War and the Woman. CHAPTER II. LOUIS DE PALEOLOGUE. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 28 November 1914

War and the Wjman. B- MAX Jfis:-. ?-«» ClIAlTEIl II. _____ LOU I a OB PALEOLOCIUE. I. Do you know Hiigu.su — Kngu.su, tho Pwirl of the Adriatic? Jt. wiih hero thut thu Imperial yacht car ried the Emperor when nt last lie sailed from Trieste— here that John Faber saw him within three hours of his going ashore. Here also Fnber found the man he had sought so many yenrs. Louis de Palclogue, who had taken his mother to America after his father's death in. Paris. Itagusa — what city is like to this ot nil that border the incomparable shore? Sebenico, Ziirit, Spalato — who cares if they perish while liagusa remains? Consider how through the centuries this little republic shut the gates ol licr sanc tuary in the face alike of Moslem and of Christian; how she defied now the Turk, now the Servian, even the mighty power of Venice at its zenith. Neither friend nor foe coming to her for shelter was refused. She protected Stephen Nemanja, who fought her allies of tlie Byzantine Umpire; she opened...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN UNFORTUNATE QUESTION. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 28 November 1914

AN UNFORTUNATE QUESTION. In the course of a lecture the other day. Dr. Blake Odgers, K.C., told a story to Il lustrate his advice that burrlstera should always bo courteous to witnesses. Ono day in court a barrister who had been brow-beating a witness asked whether he ha-d committed a certain Illegal action. Reluctantly, the witness admitted that he had. Then the barrister asked thn oulln unn^d. sary question: 'And didn't your father do tho same thing on a previous occasion?' 'I don't know,' the budgerod witness raip ped out. 'But If you want to know, you can ask him. He's over there among the Jury!' And tho barrister, whoso case depended on his being able to arouse the sympathy of the Jury. Bat down suddenly! General Villa, the Mexican brigand, has denounced the barbarities of the Kaiser's troops. More professional jealousy.

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HORSES MAY DECIDE WAR. IMPORTANCE OF CAVALRY AN AMERICAN VIEW. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 28 November 1914

HORSES MAY DECIDE WAR. IMPORTANCE OF CAVALRY AN AMERICAN VIEW. Though tho war in Europe has been In pro gress only about six weeks it is now ull but certain that the horse Is just as important as ever ho was in ihe equipment oC a successful army, notwithstanding the Invention of auto mobiles, aeroplanes, and dirigible balloons since the last great war wus fought out in Europu (says tho New York World). In re viewing the fateful campaign in Northern France tho Herald's military critic has re peatedly drawn attention to tbo vital part ployed by tho cavalry of the Allies in con stantly harassing the exposed right flank of the German ariny and hastening its retreat by threatening to get in between General von i\.iucK s command ann tne main army. Tho use of mounted troops In heavy masses Is declared to be every whit as effective as It was In our civil war, when the brilliant and telling exploits of Sheridan, Stuart, and other cavalry leaders made them popular heroes of tho day. Aeroplane...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ESCAPED IN DARKNESS. ADVENTURE WITH UHLANS. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 28 November 1914

ESCAPED IN DARKNESS. ADVENTURE WITH UHLANS. A remarkable story of an escape from Uhlans, who captured him after tho battle of Cambrai. is related to a Belfast Evening Telegraph representative by Drummer Par ker, of the Iniilskllliu;? Fusiliers, who haj reported himself for duty at the depot of tiiat regiment at Omagh. Parker vvus on outpost duty, and was surrounded by four Uhlans, who rushed at him, shouting 'Priso- ner, prisoner.' They seized and disarmed him, and marched him to a place where, owing to barbed wire entanuelments. only one horse could go at a time. Three were in front and one behind, and when darkness came he ducked under the head of the rear most horse, and, snatching a rifle, fired at the rider and then made off. The others came In pursuit, but three shots fired hy Parker stem to have caused them to pause. Any way. he got clear, and made for where !»? thought the British lines were. Ho constant ly ran against Gorman pickets, however. When daylight canio he entered ...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE TOLL OF WAR. GREAT BATTLES' COST IN HUMAN LIVES. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 28 November 1914

THE TOLL OF WAR. GREAT BATTLES' COST IN HUMAN LIVES. The toll— counted in human lives— of tho great struggle against German militarism Is going to be terribly heavy. Of that there aro already unmistakable Indications. Modern warfare is conducted by such greatly-Increased numbers that the casualty \\Mh must necessarily be far higher than In bygone days, but It Is some consolation to know that the percentage of combatants who fall has decreased considerably as com pared with the battles which were fought under more primitive conditions. ? ? ? *l... l..uu ..vnr ynnft 1flUr.il nnil wounded sustained by tho British Expe ditionary Force in its first engagement with tbe Germans Is the largest in a single battle slnco November r», IS54, when 2357 British i soldiers fell at Inkerman, It represents merely I a percentage of between 2 and 3 per cent., for it is certain that close. upon 100, U00 of our men took part in the fighting. .But at Inker man (tur losses wore 31 per cent., as only 7-100 ...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"EVERYWHERE" BOY SCOUT. HOW HE IS HELPING HIS COUNTRY. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 28 November 1914

'EVERYWHERE' BOY SCOUT. HOW HE IS HELPING HIS COUNTRY. The Boy Scout Is everywhere. Ofllcial re cognition seems to havo added to his amazing sangfroid. Slim little figures, in blue, grey, or khaki, slip through many Jeulous doors; the flash of bare knees gleams whltely on . close-guarded stairs. The War Office, tho India Office, his Ma jesty's Stationery Office, Scotland Yard, the Central Recruiting Office, and the Prince of wales s Fund at York House aro ail making use of him. He runs on messages, he pilots callers, he carries MSS. and memoranda there are 160 of him in the War Office alone. Twenty thousand of tho 200,000 British Scouts arc realising all day the Scout's great dream— they are actively helping thcif coun try. From Scotland to Chichester Harbor 12U0 of them aro helping the coastguards, with young, lynx eyes. At the mobilisation rnntroH lh« finv Sontit hnn hnon useful. Ho guides men to and from stations and bar I racks; he takes confidential messages to and from naval a...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
POISONED FODDER. LEGACY FROM ENEMY. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 28 November 1914

POISONED FODDER. LEGACY FROM ENEMY. Trains filled with large numbers of Rus I sians and Austrians wounded at Lcmbcrg, and also prisoners, havfc arrived at Fetro-. grad, says the Central News. Tlio wounded were transferred in the prcscnco of all the local officials of the Red Cross organisation, the Mayor, the municipality, and a numerous crowd to clcctric trams. Thoso badly wound ed wero placed on stretchers In spoclal whitc-naintcd cars. while tho sllchtly . wounded were removed to ordinary cars. Tho prisoners, except the Austrian officers, were marched under armed guard to their destina tion. Slavonic natives of Austria who were among the prisoners all state thut they were placed in front of the battle lino purposely by Austrians, and a wounded Russian cav alry officer relates that whilst he and his comrades were doing picket duty ho found bundles of cigarettes left by tho Austrians in one village. On examining them ho dis covered that each cigarette had a sipall ex plosive cartri...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HERR KRUPP OUTWITTED. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 28 November 1914

HERR KRUPP OUTWITTED. Many lunches but no secrets were given to Herr Krupp, the great German gun-maker, during his recent visit to England, which somo people affirm was undertaken nt tho express wish of thu Kaiser to spy into our armament works. -Tho warmest possible hospitulity was ex tended to him on every hand, says tho Jour; nul of Commerce, but runior has It. that by unaccountable mistakes Herr Krupp. found himself during his wnoio visit citnor at tne wrong works or delayed in train journeys to such an extent that ho sperit only a fow hours inspecting works. ? Tho Englishmen were so desirous to be hospitable to him that apparently they quite forgot to introduce to , Herr Krupp's notice certain sections of their works. Herr Krupp was toasted in more senses than one. . ..

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHY HIGHLANDERS WEAR SPATS. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 28 November 1914

WHY HIGHLANDERS WEAR SPATS. Most civilians have noticed that all our Highland regiments wear spats, but few know the reason why. When the British forces, which wero com posed for the greater part of Highlanders, wero under the leadership of Sir John Moore in Portugal, in 1809, thfcy were forced to re treat from Astorga to Corunna. miring me reireai— wnicn, ny the way, ended in the famous victory of Corunna— tho very boots were cut from the soldiers' feet by the Jagged rocks over which they had to pick .their way. In order to save their feet from being lacerated, the soldiers took the shirts from their bucks and, tearing them into strips, wound them round their feet. The incident was remembered, and the white spats now worn by tho gallant Highlanders wero granted in honor of their heroic march and defence.

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Family Notices [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 28 November 1914

In Memoriam. POOLE.—In loving memory of my     dear husband, Ernest Thomas Poole, who was accidentally kill- ed in the Fort Bourke mine, Cobar, Nov. 29th, 1909. Far and oft my thoughts do wander To a grave not far away, Where they laid my darling husband Just five years ago to-day. Inserted by his loving wife and child, Ada and Bobbie. FROST—In loving memory of my     dear husband and our father who departed this life December 1st, 1909. Inserted by his sorrowing wife and children.   The Western Age. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1914.

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Bachelor's Nieces, PUBLISHED BY SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT. COPYRIGHT. CHAPTER V. AN IDLE SUMMER DAY. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 2 December 1914

A_Bachclgr]sJ!iece8, ? ? — tUBLlBHBD BY SWiUlAl, ARRANGEMENT. Author of ' Footprinta In tk. Snow,' 'The Jrckcu Seal,' 'Ben«Mhtk« Waye,' ?'A Bitter Birthritflit,' 'Tho Drill of l'«te,' 'Th. SMrot of At Hiw,' 'ThtLutBigiul,' 'A Hidden Ohain,' -? A Countrr a«e«th»»rt,' » Her Ftomiu Trut,' On Goldin H'.iifei,' ' A Futil P«it,' .' ' Hi. Will mi H«ri,' *c, *o. J OOPTRIOHT. CHAPTEK V. , Ax lllLB ScMMKK I) AT. It was one of those few almost per fect (lays that we have in leafy June. Tlii-PG was just enough brcezu to give a loolness to the morning air, ns, with liis niccu sitting beside him on the box-swit of tliu waggonette, Sir lipiald (lrnvr through joinu ot the mort picturesque scenery in Argyllshire, to thft village of Mavhinm, which lay in B vullev about five miles distrait. The road tlicy Irurcllcil hrstrnn through the hamlet ofJtoss, and then after pass ing through tho C'ragside estate, entered u narrow gorgr, with high heathery hills rising on either side, until it emerged into thu ...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ONE TOUCH OF NATURE. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 2 December 1914

ONE TOUCH OF NATURE. In 'Fry's Magazine' Mr. George Warner tells somo excellent golf stories, including the following: — A girl of sweet eighteen who was being initiated into the mysteries of the game by per partner, had unexpectedly made a. splendid stroke, and, with flush ed beaming faco, looked at her in structor for a word of approbation. Words were too weak in such a case — and he, too,' was young — and he took just ono kiss — ;Only a little ono. A gentle, subdued, feeble shriek brought him to his senses, and he remembered the caddy. A shilling slippod from one hand to another's. 'Bill, this '11 help you to forget, cht'' ? . 'La! Don't you get a worrying, Guvner; why, -I'd gle a bob to do it myself.'

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WOMEN AND POLITICS. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 2 December 1914

WOMKX AXD POLITICS. ?'Apart altogether from the uiinttr:^ tive methods in parliamentary activity, the time is not opportune for luiinj,' women into the noisy arena of party politics. They have made no demand for a prominent place in party warfare, and only a very fow of our cleverest women have bad opportunity for qual'i fving for Parliament.' — ' Evening S'tar,' X.Z. ? + ?

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE RIGHT BAIT. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 2 December 1914

THE RIGHT BAIT. A (Trliiin liishiip was iwentlv a gnpst at the hume «f a l'rirnd who had two charming daughters. Ono morning tin? bishop, ni'ronipaiiii'd by the two young ladies, wont out in the hope of catching somo trout. An old fisherman, out for the aarcc purpose, wishing to appear friondlv, inlled out: — 'Catching inniir, panl?' The bishop, drawing himself to hii full height, r-'i-lied: — 'Brother, 1 am a fisher of men.1' 'Yon'vo got the right kind of lip.it all right,' wns the fisherman 'a re joinder.

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 2 December 1914

The Most Patient People Must sbow annoyance at times. Everybody has theirhourof trouble Bub people having any irritation of the skin. Have many hours of trouble. Nothing bo annoying; nothing so irritating. It's a bard and trying position. Leave it alone, and you can hardly bear it. Belief and oure have come at last. People have put ill to tbo test. Doan's Ointment euros skin disease. People are learning that this is so. Here is a case in point: — Mrs. Page, Loath Bond, Dalton Park, Cobar, eaya: — ' I can give Doan's Ointment a first-class re commendation for skin troubles. A member of my family contracted a skin disease through coming in contact with some poisonous sub stance, and the 6ores which broke out defied all treatment. I was vory worried about it, but at last I got Doan's Ointment, and this remedy effected a complete and perfeot oure. ' Fourteen year§ ^ater, Mrs. Page says :— ' Yes, Doan's Ointment is good without a doubt. It cured a member of my family of a skin dis ease f...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A LONG ROPE RAILWAY. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 2 December 1914

A LONG EOPE RAILWAY. A lope railway. 75 miles in li-usjili. is (o be put in operation iu lu.iia. It will connoc-t tho r'n-h eoiintrv in the Vale of Kashmir with tin- pin hi j of ttiu Pimjnb over the Himaliiyas. Tim line, it is claimed, will bo the longest in tin- world, the present lonyi-Mt bt-iug 2- mile* and shunted iu Argentina. .Sections will be live miles lung, and most of tho spans will lie 2,100 fi-et. The stool towers, some of which will l'O 100 foot hixh, will be braced, an, I double U inch cables, niuo feet iinnrt, will carry the Ht.H i-nrs. The carrying rapacity of these i-uis will be about 1'lU I'Oiui.ti.

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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