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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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THE LATE DUCHESS OF TECK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

THE LATE DUCHESS OF TECK.     A pretty little anecdote has just been recounted     about the late Princess Mary and her French   "coiffeur." It happened that on the day of the     Princess Victoria's wedding the Duchess was     anxious to wear some jewels particularly difficult     to arrange in her hair. She would trust no one     but the Frenchman who had coiffed her for so     many years. She therefore "commanded" the     hairdresser to arrive the evening previous to the   Royal marriage, and remain the night, so as to be   in attendance first thing the next morning.     A FRENCHMAN'S DIPLOMACY.     By an unlucky accident the "coiffeur" was de-     tained till ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AMERICAN GIRLS AND THEIR CHEWING GUM. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

AMERICAN GIRLS AND THEIR   CHEWING GUM.     Let us hope it will never come to this in Aus-     tralia. "A late diner at one of our restaurants,"     says a Philadelphia writer, "was puzzled by the   actions of the head waiter, who, with a large   kitchen knife, went from table to table, avoiding   only those that were in use, and scraped off the   under edge of every table. 'Now, what are you   doing that for?' asked the customer. 'Are you   probing for stowaways?' 'No,' answered the man   with the big knife; 'but if you will feel under the   edge of your table I expect that you will feel a   lump about the size of a marble.' The customer   tried the experiment, and found, instead of one   lump, three of them, and so told the waiter. 'Do   ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TOMMY'S GOODNESS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

TOMMY'S GOODNESS.   Tommy: "Mamma, didn't you say last week you wanted the carving-knife and the chopper sharp- ened?" Mrs. Suburb: "Indeed, I did. Bless his little heart! How thoughtful you are. They are both so blunt as to be useless." "Well, I'll take 'em round to the cutler's for you." "How sweet of you to offer to do such things for mamma, my little cherub. I'll wrap them up." "No, don't wrap them up. I want them to show. There's a boy out there waiting to fight me; but I fancy when he sees me coming he'll go home."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CORONATION DRESSES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

CORONATION DRESSES.   The dresses to be worn by illustrious ladies at King Edward's Coronation will hardly eclipse those which were seen at the Coronation of Queen Alexandra's nephew, the present Czar, in 1896. The Russian Grand Duchesses, a fair number of them, not only blazed with jewels of magnificent and almost cumbrous description, but appeared in robes of rich tissues thickly embroidered in gold, silver, and precious stones—each dress being a wonderful work of art in its way, worthy of being kept as a curiosity. If the owners con- descended to make a show of these State trap- pings, and lent them to international exhibitions, such costumes could hardly fail to attract an ad- miring public. Roman Catholic Royalties not unfrequently devote a particularly fine gown or ornament, worn on a special occasion, to some religious or charitable object, instead of allowing it to spoil unseen.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A COSTLY COURSE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A COSTLY COURSE. China, possessing the oldest aristocracy, may naturally be expected to furnish the most expen- sive luxuries. And she certainly does in so far as costly food is concerned. Compared with the peanut bud paste of China, such dishes as nightingales' tongues or straw- berries at Christmas are merely inexpensive trifles.   This paste, a combination of peanut buds and ginger jelly, is brownish in color, and is to be obtained in small jars. The price is about £2 an ounce, more than half its weight in gold, an al-   most sufficient guarantee that it is eaten very   sparingly. Peanut bud paste is said to have a flavor for Oriental palates ten times more exquisite than that of birds' nest soup. At the base of the ker- nel of a peanut is a small cone-shaped formation, usually surmounted by two microscopic leaves. The nuts are first roasted, then these minute growths are carefully extracted. They are so small that many thousands of them are...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LATEST PARIS FAD. ABOLITION OF MENU CARDS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

LATEST PARIS FAD.   ABOLITION OF MENU CARDS.   The latest and most startling novelty in the   world of fashion is to have the stiff formality   of the dinner party brightened by the appearance of some stage celebrity, who in cadence sweet will dwell upon the excellency of the fare offered by the thoughtful host or hostess as the case may be. This is the latast fad to be indulged in by the swell set of Paris. The novelty was introduced in the French capi- tal by no less a leader of fashion than the Countess Pillet-Will at a dinner party given at her magnificent house in the Rue Pauquet. There were 80 guests present, and when they sat down to dinner no sign had as yet appeared of any innovation. At that point in the festivities, how- ever, they found that there were no menu cards on the cloth before them. In the ccntre of the table was a handsome gilt centrepiece covered by trailing roses. As the guests admired this and wondered what...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A SYMPATHETIC JUDGE. On one occasion, in trying an abduction case, Lord Morris, once Chief Justice of Ireland, addressed the jury as follows:— [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A SYMPATHETIC JUDGE. On one occasion, in trying an abduction case, Lord Morris, once Chief Justice of Ireland, ad- dressed the jury as follows:— "I am compelled to direct you to find a verdict   of guilty in this case, but you will easily see that I think it is a trifling thing, which I regard as quite unfit to occupy my time. It is more valuable than yours. At any rate, it is much better paid for. Find, therefore, the prisoner guilty of abduction, which rests, mind ye, on four points—the father was not averse, the mother was not opposed, the girl was willing, and the boy was convaynient." The jury found the prisoner guilty, and the judge sentenced him to remain in the dock till the rising of the Court. Hardly had he delivered sentence than, turning to the sheriff, Lord Mor- ris said: "Let us go"; and, looking at the prison- er, he called across the Court. "Marry the girl at once, and God bless you both!"

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A CHILD'S HUMOR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A CHILD'S HUMOR. John Kendrick Bangs is of the opinion that the finest humor frequently drops unconsciously from the lips of childhood. As an illustration of the idea, he tells this story:— "Hennessey, formerly foreman of the "Herald's" composing-room, had a little daughter, who said: " 'Mamma, what are the stars?' " 'The stars, my child, are the Angel Gabriel's lamps. Every night at twilight the angel flies out of the gate of Paradise with a torch, and lights all the stars.' "On the following evening a storm darkened the heavens, and the lightning zig-zagged across the face of the sky. The child ran to her mother, exclaiming: " 'Mamma, I think the angel is going to light his lamps now.' " 'Why do you think so, my daughter?' " 'Because he is striking his matches on the sky.'"

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN ACCEPTED APOLOGY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

AN ACCEPTED APOLOGY. "Mother," asked the sweet young girl,   thoughtfully, "is love any excuse for marry-   ing?"   "Gwendolyn, my child, love is an excuse, but   money is an apology which is accepted the   world over."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Isthmian Canal. NICARAGUA ROUTE FAVORED. A WATERWAY TO COST £40,000,000. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

Isthmian Canal. NICARAGUA ROUTE FAVORED. A WATERWAY TO COST £40,000,000. Here are some of the important points in the   final report of the Isthmian Canal Commission,   which was practically completed a month ago: First: Consideration of all information ob-   tained with regard to the Nicaragua and the   Panama Canal routes establishes that the for-   mer is "the most practicable and feasible route   for an isthmian canal to be under the control,   management, and ownership of the United   States."   Second: Provision is made for a canal which   shall have a depth of 85ft. and a width at the   bottom of at least 150ft., and which shall be   provided with eight locks, four on either side   of Lake Nicaragua.   Third: Estimated cost of the construction of   the canal by the Nicaragua route is ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PECULIAR MAINTENANCE CASE. IN NEW ZEALAND. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

PECULIAR MAINTENANCE CASE.   IN NEW ZEALAND.   A singular maintenance case came before the Invercargill Court the other day, an elderly man making an application for an order to compel two sons to contribute to his maintenance. He said he was married in Scotland, his wife and he emigrating to America, and there five chil- dren were born to them, but all died except one. He acquired property there, and when the Civil War broke out he was called on to serve in the Northern Army. To avoid doing so he made over his property to his wife, and went into the mountains. His wife returned to Scotland, and they kept up correspondence. In Scotland the second defendant was born. The lads grew up and went to New Zealand with their mother. The complainant was informed by a friend in Scotland where they had gone, and correspond- ence was renewed. Both defendants wrote to him as their father, and induced him to come to the colony, paid his passage, and took him to their far...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Out Shopping. A BUSY AFTERNOON. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

Out Shopping.   A BUSY AFTERNOON.     Scene: The Cloak and Jacket Department in —'s shop in Regent-street. The clock strikes 3. Enter two elderly hard-featured ladies. Attendant (a tall, elegant-looking woman, ad- vancing to meet them): What can I get you, madam?   Elder Lady: I want to look at a black jacket, please. Attendant (sweetly): Would madam prefer a tight-fitting one or a sac? Elder Lady (hesitating—she had not thought of this before): I think I would like a tight one. (Turning to younger lady.) Don't you think that a tight one would be best, Mary? (Mary thinks it would, and attendant produces a large variety of tight-fitting jackets.) Elder Lady (turning round in front of a long mirror, and looking at her back by the aid of a hand-glass): No, I don't think I like that; it is rather too short. Have you got any longer? (She tries on a longer one.) Attendant: That fits you splendidly, madam, and is quite the latest thing. E...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE "CHASTE" ENGLISHWOMAN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

THE "CHASTE" ENGLISHWOMAN.     The "Tatler" tells an amusing story of the owner of an old hotel in the Latin quarter of Paris, which still bears traces of its former magnificence, chief among which are wall panels and overmantels painted by Frogonard and Boucher. One day an Englishwoman came to see the first floor; she liked the apartment well enough, but the goddesses and cupids caused her to veil her chaste eyes in horror. A com- promise was arrived at by the proprietor nail- ing cloths over the offending nudities, and the Englishwoman inhabited the flat for a year. Then she left; but, alas! when the cloths were removed it was found that they veiled nothing but bare walls; the Frogonards and the Bou- chers had vanished.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NEW FIELD GUN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

NEW FIELD GUN.   The British War Office is experimenting with a     new field gun invented by Sir George Clark. It is   a light weapon, and is to be attached to the     British Field Artillery. The most salient charac-     teristic of this new arm is the long trail with     which it is provided, and the under portion of     which forms a storage, thus dispensing with the     use of a limber.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A THREAT HE LIKED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A THREAT HE LIKED. Newly wed: "Does your wife ever threaten to go home to her mother?" Oldboy: "Why, my boy, I wouldn't consider that a threat."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MAYORAL BLUNDERS. SOME LUDICROUS INSTANCES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

MAYORAL BLUNDERS.   SOME LUDICROUS INSTANCES. The Mayoral elections in Great Britain which take place during the month of November have called forth the usual crop of funny stories. Here are a few of them:— A NOVEL TOAST. The story is told of an old Mayor of Birming- ham that when entertaining the Ambassadors from the Tycoon of Japan, he proposed the health of his Imperial Majesty, the Typhoon of Japan, and it was perhaps a wag who remembered this toast who wrote the inscription for the Mayor's tombstone. The Mayor was a knight, and the inscription read:—"There is no night there." Many of us have heard a town council adjourned "sine die till to-morrow," and all of us have heard of the Mayor who ordered a pair of gondolas from Venice, for breeding purposes. Less known is the story of the Mayoral chairman who announced at an entertainment that the au- dience would now have recited to them "that soul-stirring piece, the leg end of Horatius." It was a Mayor who had more int...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHAT TO INVENT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

WHAT TO INVENT.     The daily press, says the "American Inventor,"   is at present publishing accounts of an alleged   invention of a Pennsylvania man which purports   to be the re-discovery of the lost art of tempering   copper. The Government is reported as having   taken the matter up for use on warships, and a tidy fortune is predicted for the fortunate in- ventor. All of which may be very true, but tem- pering copper is a wolf cry which has been heard at intervals for years. At the same time, the art will be re-discovered some day, if it has not been already, and there are several other things which will also come to light again which will bring to their inventors not only riches but the fame which came to Morse and Fulton and Watt. Tempered copper is but one. Malleable glass is believed to have been in ancient times, and if it is ever discovered again there will be untold millions in it....

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MORE WORK FOR PAT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

  MORE WORK FOR PAT.   An Irish regiment was having the usual morn-   ing drill. The sergeant, observing that a re-   cruit's neck was the color of Mother Earth,   said:—   "Pat, turn round and look at your dirty neck!"

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SUBMARINE CABLE'S JUBILEE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

SUBMARINE CABLE'S JUBILEE.   On November 13, 1861, the submarine cable laid by Crampton from Dover to Calais began its "career," a gun sounding from Calais in honor of the triumph. There had been various experi- ments before that, but communication snapped at the critical moment. For some 20 years after the late Queen's coming to the throne, there was no telegraph to America. Then 2500 miles of British wire, weighing about a ton per mile, were arranged for. Two ships, with decks that sug- gested factories, sailed forth to lay the cables, and steamed towards each other. For about 300 miles the cable was dropped as desired along the bottom of the sea. Then, alas, it snapped, and the broken end was lost in the deep. Again the ships went forth, but this time a new plan was tried. In mid-ocean the ends of the cable were spliced, and the vessels in connection with them went their different ways—one east, one west. The distance between the ships duly increased, and eventually ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SUBMARINE BOATS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

SUBMARINE BOATS.   It has become the fashion to sneer at sub- marine vessels in some quarters, but English technical journals do not indulge in the practice, for they see in the growing fleet of French sub- marine vessels a distinct menace to English com- merce. There are 29 submarine boats now, of the electric type, in France, and five of other kinds, and they are constantly increasing in numbers. "Engineering" says that if 100 of these vessels were let loose at night in the Channel, they would be capable of establishing themselves in favor- able positions before daylight and do incalculable damage to British commerce; it thinks that the submarine boat has increased the dangers from torpedoes tenfold.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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