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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. SI that way in such a forest, and how awkward it was to get lost for no reason whatever. It would have been a con solation to mo if I had got lost on some errand of charity, in the discharge of my duties. However, thinking did not mend the matter, nor did it bring to me anything to eat. All I could do, therefore, was to acquit my duty to God the best I could. I recited my rosary instead of the breviary, and then I began my preparations for the night The open sky is not a very good bedroom, in the middle of Novem ber, if you have no blanket to wrap yourself in, and there was no telling what visitors might call in during the long night hours, so the best was to rustle for all the dry wood I could get around, make a heap of it, and have it handy This done as I did not daro to lie on the bare, damp ground, being already aillicted with rheumatism I shifted my fire until it was near enough to a big tree to allow me to sit down on a big root, and to prop my back agains...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. -, together my two hands near my mouth' so as to answer the more loudly, and I trumpeted forth the most lusty cry for help. This did not bring help, but brought relief, for the cowardly beasts ceased instantly their yells and fled. I could not help laughing at this unex pected turn of affairs, and patting myself on the back, I quoted: " Fc suis done un foudrc de guerre!" "Am I, then, such a thundering warrior!" But besides wolves there are other denizens of the forest, and it was quite possible that before the end of the night I heard the yell of a panther, which I could hardly hope to silence by mjr whoop and cry. My only hope, then, would be to keep a good bright fire blazing, and as my wood was already giving out, I shook myself, and went about as far as I dared in the circle of light made by the fire, in quest of more fuel. I had already picked all that was on the ground, so there remained no help to it but to jump and catch at the lower branches of the tree...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. S3 noy. I soon came to a fine little stream, on the banks of which seven door were cropping the dry grass. I startled them and they fled. I followed this stream for some time in the hope that it might lead me to an Indian camp, for the Osages love to build their huts near such. Indeed, I arrived upon, shall I say a camp ? No ; it was but the ghost of a camp an old Osage encampment composed of six or seven skeletons of tepees, that is, presenting nothing but the bare poles and branches which, in time past, had been covered with skins or barks of trees. There was nothing to be found hero except bones, white and bleached. A little further I came across an old cattle-trail which had not been used perhaps for five or six years; still knew it passed near a settlement, and J resolved to keep close to it. But man is not made of iron; my strength was failing me, and I began to think seriously I would have to go no further. ' I tried again my acorns, and found again they ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

u THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. with the bell that had so roused mo; and, not far from there, three In dian squaws were gathering and piling up dry wood. As I came up to them I was so weak that my knees were knock ing together, and a little rock giving way under my feet I fell flat on the ground. The good creatures looked at me compassionately, and when I arose J I told them in Indian I had had no food for these two days, and wished they would give me some. They showed me a path that would lead me to their te pees; there, they said, the men would help me. I soon came to one where a big Indian was singing to himself their dance song. I had neither a mind to dance nor to sing. I told him I was the priest Wakomtah Ta-pus-ka, had been lost for two days and wished to have food. He looked at me in a queer manner, as much as to say: "You, the priest! You look like one." And, if the truth must be told, indeed I looked more like a poor miserable tramp, with my face blackened by the smoke of my fire, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 25 Tle igcl ot jpargatory. HOW MANY SWK17T UKMINISCBKCKS THIS TITLE JIECAM.S TO A CHRISTIAN MIMJ. Out of the Depths. Out of the depths, do I cry to Thee A pitying ear, lend, 0 Lord, to me. 'Tis not of my pain I ask surcease, Not from this ilame I beg release ; But, oh, this love that racks my soul, This thirst, this straining toward Thee, my goal Out of the depths, do I cry to Thee. Out of the depths, do I cry. Ah, mo 1 The folly, the sin, and the vanity Of the joys of earth I so eagerly sought, Of the fleeting joys I so dearly bought. Oh, that a single hour were mine, To hasten th' embrace of my Love Divine ! Out of the depths, do I cry. Ah, me 1 Out of the depths do I cry to you, "Who ever on earth I found tender and true. Once for each wound ye had healing balm ; In stress and in storm, with you it was calm. "When closed forever death's portals on me, Did I forfeit all claim to your charity ? Out of the depths do I cry to you ! IN MEMORIAM. It is always sad t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

86 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. The Light for the Poor Souls. "LET PERPETUAL light shine upon TIIEM." Many of our readers have probably seen and others have frequently heard of the largest subterranean cavern in the world, the Mammoth Cave in Ken tucky. It contains large vaults, con nected by long, narrow, winding pas. sages, ample halls by the side of deep ravines, spanned by seemingly frail and primitive bridges. On first approaching the cave an involuntary shudder 'seizes the boldest heart, as the great hideous opening yawns at him, and the eye seeks in vain to search into the impenetrable darkness beyond. One of the many interesting features of the cave is the room called the Star Chamber. The ominous name is given the place because in the deep and black darkness the stalactitic pendants on the ceiling glis ten and give the surface of the ceiling some resemblance to a starry sky. The party being seated, the guide takes each one's lanters with him and retires to a distant place, leaving ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 27 God is essentially Light, and lie has called us, as the Apostle says, Unto His admirable light, and as heart knows no repose until it rests in God, so our spiritual eye will suffer until it feasts upon the brightness of God's holy countenance. When the light of this life is extinct, then especially the soul yearns for the sight of God, with a yearning unknown to this life. The suffering from this unsatisfied craving of the soul to behold God, the suffering by the holy soul from this temporary spiritual darkness is greater than all the other sufferings of Purgatory com bined. With reference to this two-fold dark ness, the Church, in her Office of the Dead, expresses the condition, and the prayer of the departed: "After dark ness I hope for light again. The land of the dead is my home, and I have made my bod in darkness." "Deliver me, 0 Lord, from the ways of hell, who hast broken open the brazen gates and visited hell, and given light to behold Thee to those w...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

w f 28 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. r'l from a natural view fills the chamber of death. In ancient times the corpse was carried into the church in the evening, and there by the light of the sacred candles the faithful would spend the night reciting psalms for the repose of the departed. The custom of using lights at burials was observed already bj' the ancient Romans, and we still have their name " Funalia " for the torches the' used on such occasions. The first Christians necessarily employed torches in bury ing their dead as on account of the persecutions they were obliged to bury them at night and in the subterranean catacombs. It is touching to read of their funeral processions, in which each held his lighted taper, which was at the same time a symbol of rejoicing over the holy death of their brethren. After the persecution, however, the custom of bearing torches was retained for its spiritual meaning. St. Gregory Nazianzen relates, that the body of the Emperor Constantine, was buried '...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

The Indian Advocate. Devoted to the Interests of Indian Missions. Vol. VIII. APRIL, 1896. No. 2. Written for tho Advocate. THE CHILDREN OF THE SNOW. A CARNIVAL STORY. By Francis J. Finn, S. J. It is a wild afternoon in early Febru ary. Tho last rays of the sun are shin ing faintly upon a wild stretch of bare, level land bare and level but for one solitary tree which stands alone, gaunt and grim, flingingout its naked branches to the eastern wind in seeming mute protestation of its loneliness. The sky, save in the west, where it is still blue and open, is of a dull leaden hue; it frowns down upon this open level, des olation frowning upon desolation. The sun's rays throw some little relief upon the nether gloom, but even their light is wild and weird, the light of a stormy sunset, and as it dips below the western rim, the shadowy form of the twilight steals apace over the scene, while her coming is heralded by a sudden drop ping of the heavens in feathery flakes, which, falling in ma...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

pwyr tw 50 TiUS INDIAN ADVOCATE. tWTwijn It- wfv f "Yes, my Teresa," answers the boy; "they are very beautiful indeed." "Won't papa be surprised when he finds us out here to meet him?" "Surely; that is, if we do not miss him. You see when I proposed that we should come out to meet him coming home I didn't think that it would begin to snow." "That's so;" said Teresa. "If it be gins to fall faster we may not be able to see; and then our little trick to please papa may fail. You know the way, Giovanni, do you not?" "Oh, that's no trouble," answered Giovanni, evasively. "All we .have to do is to walk straight on. We can do that no matter how hard it snows." "And besides," added the girl, "Mam ma can see down through the snowlakes just as easily as though it were not snowing at all. Doesn't it seem long since mamma went to heaven?" "It is long, Teresa. She's been happy for why, it is just one year to-night since she hissed us good-by, and told us that she would wait for us with God." "Ye...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

W ' "" ' irW ttjttj" """- wvjfrY'V;,Ttr''"'a,''" .? ' "."""V';"'''''-'" '"" ' j'g'Vvi'"'"'"" ' v"W" FiTtf INDIAN ADVOCATE. 31 JTI'T-t.V dressed so beautifully, who sang and danced beneath our balcony, and papa throw them a piece of gold?" In answer to this Giovanni caroled a pretty, gay air, redolent of the carnival. "Oh!" cried Teresa, clapping her hands, "that's the very thing they sang. I'm getting cold, Giovanni. Lot's play we're in Rome, and the carnival is go ing on." With whitih the girl took a few steps forward, and swinging her arms above her head as though she were playing upon a tambourine, moved through the steps of a dance, fairy-like in its grace and beauty, while Giovanni with fuller voice, a beautiful treble, brought from a land where voices are sweetest and art is a heritage, even of the peasant, caroled forth a song so sweet and light and gay, you would think it had come from Paradise; and heedless of the snow and dying light, the little one, more than ever like a ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

82 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ri w 3 x Giovanni." And at once the child, as sisted by her brother, took a kneeling position and repeated the sweet words learned from a mother's lips. "Teresa," continued Giovanni, "I want you to say one more prayer with me. It's an act of the love of God, and I want you to try and love him when you say it as much as you can." "I'll try, brother." And together from their innocent hearts they poured the prayer which such souls as theirs may best interpret aright. "Now, little sister, I'll watch." "Good night, my Giovanni. How I wish it was morning, so I could see your dear face; good night." And Teresa's eyes closed wearily. No sooner was Giovanni assured that she was fast asleep than he took off his coat and tucked it tenderly about the little form. The little man he was only nine shivered and shook as the cold blast beat upon his frail form thus rudely exposed. But he cared little could he but save the gentle life under his charge. The snow was now beating...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

"T" THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 3S x the Word of God, have always recom mended the constant use of the Bible to those who would lead the lives of true followers of Christ. Pope Pius VI. (1778) wrote: "At a time when a great number of bad books are circulated among the unlearned you judge exceedingly well that the faithful should be excited to the reading of the Bible, for this is the most abundant source which ought to be left open to every one to draw from it purity of mor als and of doctrine." Pope Pius VII. (1820) urged the Eng lish Bishops to encourage their people to read the Bible. Our Holy Father, Pope Leo XIII., made the study of the sacred Scriptures the subject of a recent encyclical. This study he calls a "noble one." The doctors and fathers of the Church are unanimous in their recommenda tions to read the Bible. "To be igno rant of the Bible," says St. Jerome, "is to be ignorant of Christ." And again: "Full of delights is the Word o; God from it every one draws what he needs." ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

v?SSS5 .;, J ."fffi v T 34. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 'Wfryn:f ,- ' ft' fr OUR INDIANS ASVTHEY ARE. More about the present-day Indians of the United States than was ever told in a book before is contained in the final census report just issued from the Gov ernment Printing Oflice. It forms an immense quarto volume of 683 pages, profusely illustrated with the original photo-engravings and sketches in colors and was prepar ed by Thomas Donaldson, of Philadelphia,the antiquarian and Indian expert. He gave to the task the varied resources of his wide acquaint ance among In dian students and Indian ar tists, and many of the latter he sent into the field to make at first hand drawings, photographs and oil sketches of striking phases of Indian life. He secured pic tures from the brushes of such painters as Peter Moran,' Julian Scott, Walter Shirlaw, Gilbert Gaul and H. R. Poore; men whose time it would have been chief of the impossible to employ for such a purpose I under ordinary circumstances...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

T-fT-p-f irW-A " -i "T'WV " W W THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 36 The reservation Indians are located in twenty different states and territories, and include about 147 tribes or parts of tribes, occupying about 78,500,000 acres of unallotted land, much of it desert. The reservations are embraced within fifty-four agencies and are each con troled by an agent appointed by the Now York state is shown to have 6,044 Indians, of whom 5,309 reside on reser vations of their own, and continue to maintain their ancient tribal govern ments as remnants of the Six Nations, while 735 others live off reservations and are regarded as citizens, taxable and qualified to vote. These 1 alter ro- CHIEF OF THE SACS AND FOXES. President, with a complete civic admin istration, physicians, clerks, school teachers, farmers and mechanics. There are about 3,000 white employes on the reservations. Some of the agencies are controled by army officers with a force of soldiers. The Indian police force consists of 770 Indian ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

86 TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Madison 84 Monroe 23 Oneida 02 Onondaga 22 St. Lawrence 17 Saratoga 25 Suffolk 50 Warren 42 Other counties 131 New Jersey has 84 civilized and self supporting Indians. Connecticut has 228, mostly fishermen and laborers, and Rhode Island has 180. Massachusetts has 428 self-supporting and taxable In dians, descendants of the old Wampa noag tribe; Vermont has 346 Indians, and Pennsylvania has 9S Indians be longing to the Seneca tribe of the Six Nations of New York, and 983 others, who are voters and pay taxes. The great bulk of the Indians are now found on our outermost frontiers. Thus 51,279 live in the Indian Territory; 29,981 live in Arizona, 19,854 in South Dakota, 16,624 in California, 15,044 in New Mexico, 13,177 in Oklahoma, 11, 206 in Montana, 11,181 in Washington, and 10,096 in Minnesota. An interesting table of early estimates and censuses of Indians is given, from which it would appear that the decrease in the Indian population all over the country ha...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

fciSHaarsst " rt uv rv j . v HVMHUHP1T.1' 'Aan(n 3IETW"V 1 "S " "t.TT-rT''F-VT'- " ,r r-y Ti-vymjypujV'T?''- rxrr fji w v t'"4-;v pS9 Ttf INDIAN ADVOCATE. 87 mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm Written ior the Advocate. AN INDIAN TALE. Carrie M. LeFlore. The moaning November wind made dismal echoing music in the forest trees surrounding an humble homo in wild Kumtia county. All within was wrapt in profound silence save for the short, quick cries of a new-born Indian babe. The interior was extremely primitive, from the low couch on which reposed the mother, to the wide, open fireplace, be side which stood a majestic man past early manhood, but in the prime of life. An aged woman sat crooning softly to the new-born one. "Imistowa, dost thou not desire to name the boy for his brave grandsire Ounecuh?" The low, sweet voice roused the man from his reverie, and a rare, sweet smile lighted his sombre features. He crossed to her side, and taking the frail hands in his own, said: "Yes, my Marie. We will call h...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

n.v 88 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. W$4TT- air was laden with the "breath of Para dise," ho sat beneath the grand oak trees, and to wife and children recount ed glories of the past. He showed to the boy the dance of the warriors in the western skies as it appeared that eve of long ago when Pushmatahaw passed away. He saw all, and felt the grief of Cunecuh, the beloved grandsire. A day came when Imistowa no longer sat beneath the trees. He lay battling with death. When the news went forth that the friend of high and low was near ing the "unknown bourne," messages poured in to the afiiicted family. One night the fevered brow cooled, the light of reason shone in the dark eyes, a smile lighted the pallid face, and the old melodious voice "my wife." The end was near. Poor Marie! Her soul had relied on that strong man. What won der il it, she sank sobbing wildly by his side. The wan face gleamed strangely as he strove to comfort her The chil dren knelt by the couch. Cunecuh, a youth of fifteen; L...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

j.jpw-t r""i i pvywr irr v?? jwy-nr j- nyc -t r?r-wrwr"rtf,)m-vPfWr -""rfyVT'" rV1' '""V ?',73fljiftffiyffr' -iWwy.r,yy-n, v j-ty-r T r " w-w -' v;- !T5" INDIAN ADVOCATE. 39 his father. Onco he spoke, bidding the watchers, "do not weep; I shall soon bo strong." Ah, yes, in his Father's Homo ho would "soon bo strong" again. The struggle was of long duration. The sun went down in golden splendor, filling the room with soft heavenly light. Just as the veil of deepening twilight hid the dance of dead warriors in the western sky the end came. With outstretched arms, he cried: "Father, I come' I have kept the promise! It is well." The form relaxed the brown eyes had looked their last on earth they opened in heaven. The night drew her sable curtains, tho pale moon rose and filled the room with softened splendor, lighting the dark face of Cunecuh with her radiance. The sobbing of tho bereaved filled the room, but he who had never been deaf to sounds of woe, was beyond the reach of tears. Th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1896

4.0 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. has not been made known by the min isters of Christ, and eagerly accepted by devout and loving hearts. "The wonderful development and ex tent of this devotion show clearly that it must have been a heavenly inspira tion that suggested the consecration of this most beautiful month of the year to the Immaculate Queen of heaven and earth." Nor was the choice of the month itself in preference to all other months with out its meaning, as we shall see in the following. There is no stronger opposition than between life and death. There are no two months more opposed than Decem ber and May. They are the most dis tant from each other they are the dead liest foes. The one brings winter; it destroys, spoils, ruins all; it extends over the earth the shadow of death; sets forth its dismal skull in the scalped tree, the nude gray earth, the dead grass, the bare grave. Life lies buried in the tomb. In their retreat the birds seem to mourn in silence, and sad nature sheds te...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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