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Title: Great Falls Tribune Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 1,630 items from Great Falls Tribune, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 23 October 1886

GrREAT FALLS TRIBUNE. WEEKLY TRIBUNE, r*lip BEYTI SATURDAY BY THE TRIBUNE PUBLIS!HING COMPANY, [I xoo6aPl, oiZDl ADVERTIFING RAIA'J'S FUINISHIED ON AP PLlCATION. SU3SCRIPTION RATES One cr'py 1 yr (in ad-van cý ...............4:1:. h (bo copy u I:linL+ ........................... I.: OU , cop3n- ndm ........................... . 1.W. Op 3i mafl copi. .... .................... ... 1: Striily in ad rance. TIhe ,hnlat-ion of the T'RIS::xtEin N-)rthern lstonmi is guar tnti sl to tex c.d that of any pa per published in the territory. Subhcribers d".iring thir adltcss chaenred mu~t send t.eir fou.ni-r addrt; this shoulds bs . ra:lman .. rtI. Addro, TR£ 'IBrNE PrULSTONG C(O. DEMOCRATIC NDMINATION3. Dele.att to C',on;r es.......JOSEP-I K . TOOLE 'COUNTY TICK' KT. ('ouncil.........................T. E. ('OLIANS H ouse ........................JES-A, F. '.tYLjOH C.mnmissin r........... ('lr:k and 'l,-r;-. . .......... .."!. !i. .HO EI, R Tr,.:nrr. ................... IJtM . o . 31.'II LAT 4 oun...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 23 October 1886

RIPPLE OF THE RAPIDS. Jos. P. Lewis, of Canton, Missouri, was in town this week. Eph. Donahue, of Sun River, took in Great Falls Wednesday. W. B. Johnson, of Highwood, favored us with a call Wednesday. H. B. Dickinson, an employe of the TRIBUNE, has gone to Helena. W,. I. . Black, of Choteau, the republican -nominee for sheriff, was in town one day this week. 3Mr. and Mrs. Vaughn were down from their home Wednesday and took in the :theatre in the evening. Mr. Knight, of the firm of Albrec lit & Knight of this place, has returned to Da ola: to remain during the winter. A number of the members of the Dem ,acratic club of this place, attended the I rally in Sun 1iver Friday evecning. WV. J. Minar and C. M. Lanning were amaong the Bentonites in attendance upon t.he republican mass meeting Thursday ..vening. 3Mr. A. M. RPwoles, of Sun River, open ,di his heart to the extent of a full basket t ._f delicious grapes, which all the TmnrIsE Jfrice are enjoying to the fullest extent. 3lr. ...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 23 October 1886

GREAT FALLS TRIBUIE. Building. CONTINUED. Framing:-Iu the Eastern states, the next step always is to lay :n under-floor of planed hemlock or sapruce bhards, over which tile men move freely, while it forms a roof to the cellar, which can im mediately be used for storage of tools and materialn. "Whether this is idone or not, after the floor is made practicable for the passage of woirmen :across it, the large pests should be set up at thet angles, and at the intersection of interior partitions with outside walls. Thrse should be 4x8. at lea-t, even ill a b:lleonll" f'-atiu, naot so much for strength as to give good railings for the anglo- of interior furrings, wa-in scott and ba~e-boards. The subsequent stops d -perd upon the mode of construction atdoied---whether a "balloon" or a "-'raced" fraw- is sp.i:tifed; and it i. of in' portance that the nature and advantage .f'+c hout2 i e 'ih rougshly understood. Supptiod g a. tbraced" or-ld-f;:thi-oned" frame i t.i e e iled fr, the next step...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 23 October 1886

SPLITTING TEN-DOLLAR BILL. A New Scheme of Counterfeiting Money--How it was Discovered. A new departure in the matter of coun terfeiting money was brought to light at the United States sub-treasury in Balti more a few days ago. A somewhat worn $10 government bill was presented at the cashier's window with a request for change, -which was given. The note was sent to Washington as mutilated currency, and was returned with the information that one side of the note was good, but the other side was a well-executed counter feit of the original. It was found that a genuine $10 bill had been split, the face being separate from the back, a seemingly impossible undertaking. The original face, with a counterfeit back had used, and it is quite likely that the genuine back with a well executed counterfeit face had been passed in some other quarter. The portion of the note was worth exactly its proportion of the whole, or in other words, $5. More recently another $10 "front" was presented at the ...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 23 October 1886

GREAT FALLS, MONTANA. GREAT FALLS is located at the Falls of the Missouri which furnis'h the greatest available water power on the Continent. Is within seven miles of the most extensive COAL and IRON district in the West, immediately beyond which are rich GOLD, SILVER and COPPER districts. It lays tributary the best agricultural and grazing part of the Territory, and the pineries of the Upper Missouri and tributaries. It is especially adapted by its natural resources and geographical position to become the leading MANUFACTURING CITY between Minneapolis and the Pacific, and the principal RAILROAD CENTER of Montana. The trip to Great Falls will amply repay tourists by the beauty of the scenery on the way, and they will find here the most magnificent series of waterfalls in the worl(, while the surrounding country is rich in picturesqe scenery. For further information address H .O. C.HOWE N, Agent. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . ...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 6 November 1886

GREAT FALLS RIBUNE. VOL. 2. GREAT FALLS, MONTANA TERRITORY, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 18868 - NO 25 DOG-FACED MEN. The ,"Interested Reader" FinishesHis Essay and Gives His Opponents Some Hard Knocks-His Proof Seems Positive. T'o the Triblune: THE HAPPY CONFERENCE. The Quadrumania or Monkeys are noted for their capacity for climbing. Their feet have opposable thumbs, like those on the human hands, making their feet very much like their hands, hence the name of the order. It is not natural for them to stand erect like man, and those species nearest approach ing him rest upon the outer side of the foot only, and not upon its sole, when im itating his position. IIowever, we cannot here discuss the anatomical differences be tween man and apes further than the cra nium is concerned. We have seen what a series of graduations may be traced in the human face, and a corresponding gradua tion of the facial aspect may be observed in the apes; while at one end of the series the "muzzle (at least in ...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 6 November 1886

A Scrap of History Bozeman Chronicle: In the latter part of May, 1873, a small party of traders camped on the Teton, four miles north from Fort Benton ; reaching the river.quite late, and not taking the usual precaution to guard against thieves, for the reason that the boys were worn out by ineessant guard duty after a long and tedious trip. During the night a party of Piegan In dians stole every horse the party possess ed and pushed north with all possible haste. When morning came and a strict search disclosed the fact that their ani mnals had been stolen by the Indians, the traders held a council and finally decided to pursue the thieves. After carefully looking over their strength, it was decid ed that the following named persons should constitute the pursuing party: John Evans, G. M. Bell, T. Hale' Geo. Hammond Thos. Hardwick, F. Vogle, C. Harper, Moses Solomon, Jas. Hughes, Jas. Marshall, Jeff. Devereaux. S. Vincent, Ed Grace. These men, armed with Winchester rifles, started on...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 6 November 1886

He Asked a Few Questions. "Charles Berry, cashier of the Rock Is 'land freight office, is well known to be one f of the most courteous and pleasant gentle men in the railroad business. He is ever I ready to give information, and usually sub mits to any number of irrelevant questions a without a murmur. Yesterday, however, his placidity was somewhat ruffled by the t lqueries of a young man, who opened with the following: "Say, mister, what time does the mail go f, to St. Louis?" "At 5 o'clock this afternoon." "What time does it get there?" "About 7 o'clock the next morning." "What time will the mail be delivered." "I could not say, but if your letter is im plortant you can put on a special delivery stamp and it will reach its destination be tween 8 and 9 o'clock." "Is this 5 o'clock train a mail train?" "It is." "But supposing it is behind time?" "Well, (facetiously,) it would probably be late." "'By what time did you say it gefs there ?" "Seven o'clock." "Is that clock up there righ...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 6 November 1886

GREAT FALLS TRIBUNE. WEEKLY TRIBUNE, TItigl SBT MiM L DATY B THE TIIBUlI PUBLISHI811G COMPANY, [tnooroaRATxoi tDYIiT IlG lATHES UgSINI8HED ON AP PLICATION. SUBSCRIPTION RATEGS Qaneepy 1 year, (in advance) ..........$.3 .00 Otesopy imonths,.... ................ 1.0 One copy a months........... ................ 1.110 Speci n spi ............ .... ..... 10 StrcltJy in advance. Ike kcalaton of the Trtunas in Northern M en~ena i gearanteed to exceed tkat of ~ny pa pw published in the territory. Sabeerbers deairing their addrea hanged mut sand their former adidrvas; this should be acmembered. Address, TriBarx PBrsar xo Co. SATURDAY, NOV. 6, 1886. Thanksgiving Proclamation. WAsuIINcTON, Nov. 1st.-The following is Cleveland's proclamation, designating Thursday, November 25th, as the day of thanksgiving and prayer: A PROCLAMATION BY THE: rllOI::l-;T OF THEa UNITED STATES. It has long been the custom of the peo ple of the United States, on a day in each year especially set apart for that purp...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 6 November 1886

RIPPLE OF THE RAPIDS. Geo. Field has gone to Helena. MI. J. Learning and W. J. Minar made t "their final electioneering tour last Satur day. c Prof. Mortson brought in the election 84 returns from upper Sand (oulee, promptly c Wednesday a. m. M.r. Louis Sorrick has accepted the pos ition of school teacher at Highwood, whither he has removed with his family. W.J. Pratt has been sick for several days from the effects of poison which lurk- n ed in canned oysters. We are glad to an- th nounce that he is convalescent. es "I've peen playing in hard luck" said a 2i rounder the other day, who looked as cc though he had been shot out of a cannon, s run over by a loaded freight team and put K under a pile-driver in action. "le been It in thirteen fights this week and got licked - every time, but if it ever comes my way look out." After delivering this admoni tion he seemed to feel better and walked proudly up the street whistling "see the ec conquering hero comes." "Hello, Uncle George" said ...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 6 November 1886

GREAT FALLS 'TRIBUNE. The Lost Ruby. About twenty years ago, Dr. B -- was a well-known physician in one of the larg est-cities in the Southern states, the center of a large social circle of intelligent peo ple, by whom he was much honored and loved. He was a geologist, and in his vacations used to tramp through the mountains of the great Smoky and Black ranges in North Carolina, a region dear to scientific men. On one occasion he was driven by a storm to take refuge in a cave, and amus ed himself by picking out the rock at the side. lie discovered it to be the peculiar kind of formation in which rubies are found. Land in that region then sold for a few cents an acre, and Dr. 1.--- - the next day bought the hill in which was the cave. From that th ime h, neglected his patients and studie-, and gave himself up to mining for pr:cious stones. After a few years he succeeded in dis covering a large ruby of such great value tihat its sale would ensure his fortune. Hie sent it to Holland to...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 6 November 1886

ROBBED AND SLUGGED. Charles Miller the principal victim in the greatest of all western train robberies, is now employed in the auditor's office of 1 the Pacific Express Company at Omaha, and although nearly nine years have elaps ed since his terrible experiences, he re members everything that occurred with vivid distinctness. As a reminder of the I robbery, Charley wears two scars, which he received for resisting the bandits-one on his upper lip, and one on his scalp. Here is Charley's story of the robbery: At the time of the robbery which occurred on f the night of Monday, September 17, 1877, a I was running as messsenger for the Union 1 Pacific railway express, between Omaha t and Cheyenne, and was coming east on I No. 4. The local money "pick-up" was t light as it usually was on every Monday. 1 The through run amounted to $235,000, C and of this amount $175,000 was in the I through combination safe. The remaining f $60,000 of this amount could not be placed I in the safe for the ...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 6 November 1886

- - GREAT FALLS, MONTANA . GREAT FALLS is located atthe Falls of the Missouri which furnish the greatest available water power on the Continent. Is within seven miles of the most extensive COAL and IRON district in the West, immediately beyond which are rich GOLD, SILVER and COPPER districts. It lays tributary the best agricultural and grazing part of" the Territory, and the pineries of the Upper Missouri and tributaries. It is especially adapted by its natural resources and geographical position to become the leading MANUFACTURING CITY between Minneapolis and the Pacific, and the principal RAILROAD CENTER of Montana. The trip to Great Falls will amply repay tourists by the beauty of the scenery on the way, and they will find here the most magnificent series of waterfalls in the world,, while the surrounding country is rich in picturesqe scenery. For further informatlon address H. O. CHO WE N, Agent. SPRAY OF THE FALLS. B to Robert Williams is in town again. E. B. Largent was in tow...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 13 November 1886

GREAT F'ALLS TRIIBUNE. VOL, 2, GREAT FALLS, MONTANA TERRITORY, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1886, NO 26 DOG-FACED MEN. Prof. Mortson and Bilbert De Goice, Set Down Hard on the "Interested Reader"-Able Arguments on the Subject. Written f]r the Tribune: I find my short article of October 16th. has drawn a lengthy reply from "An In terested Reader," the first h:df column of which is composed entirely of personali ties. and various other portions contain what the I. R. thinks are very facetious interlaudations, calculated to leave the im pression that the author is very witty, sar castic, as well as sage. The "Interested Reader" has not deign ed to divulge what sex the I. R. belongs to, but I will say this, if he is a gentleman, he has overstepped the ordinary bounds of politeness, and his paper read. miore like an electioneerin, campairn document than a scientific di sertation. If she is a hlady, she is thro.ing around herself the shi!ld which modern civilization concedsti to her, as well as...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 13 November 1886

WASHINGTON LETTER. From Our Regular Correspondent. .aYssHitGTON, Oct. 30, 1886. The only episode of the week that vari ed in President Cleveland's work day life was his trip to New York and participa tion in the "Statue of Liberty" celebration. He was accompanied by his trusted private secretary, Col. Lamont, and four members -of his cabinet-secretaries Bayward, Whit ney, Lamar and postmaster general Vilas. 'The President and Lamont came near be i.ng left. As the time of departure grew :limited, the other members of the party 'took their places in the special car and be ºcame quite impatient at Mr. Cleveland's 'tardiness. Just at the moment for the train to start, however, he hurriedly enter ed the car. A number of other official and also unofficial Washingtonians went to the unveiling on the presidental train. Rev. Byron Sunderland, the President's pastor and the man who performed his marriage ceremony, has been indulging in some plain pastoral talk. It was a sharp reply to a newsp...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 13 November 1886

A TALE OF THE NOW. An American Story by an American Author ,Using American In gredients The glorified and inflamed west was just deepening into rosy twilight, and the etist Sern hills were in the act of peeling off their ruddy robes for the night, when a wnell dressed Enirlishman of American de s:enat inuigrt have been seen wending his . zy in a northeasterly direction, regardless .of the gathering night. ife was tall, lithe and pimply in the ex treme, with a large, wistful, dewy eye. The o.ther ee way - also in the same condition. is s name was Edmund Clayborne Briggs, a domesticated Englishmen from Massa ,chusetts. He was a self-made man; but, as.ide from that, he had never done any thing reprehensible. Edmund Clay}borne Briggs' ancestors ha:d toiled for a livelihood, for they were an ignorant peclie -ad did not know any bet ter. !e weas en :gaed in trying to over covne this inherited desire for industry-- thii stranIe, morbid ye rning for some thi'. to do. His success thus far ha...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 13 November 1886

GREAT FALIS TRIBUNE. WEEKLY TRIBUNE, Ser iluý y mV SA~EDAT BY T? TIIBUbiE PUBLISHIlNi COMPAlY, [ascoavoaax T) AD)YVERTII5 G RATES FURNISHED ON AP PLICATION. SUBSCRIPTION RATES Onesepy 1 year, (in advance) ............... 5.00 O(esopy S months,.................... 1.50 O e copy S months.................. .. 1.00 p i an sepiw ,.......... ......... ......... 10 Strictly in advance. 'Ie skculatlon of the TaBauaEin Northern ealtana is guarante~d to exceed that of any pa ps published in the territory. .Sbscrlers desiring their address changed mast send their former address; this should be remembered. Addrean, TrIBUNE PUBLISING CO. SSATURDAY, NOV. 13, 1886. Thanksgiving Proclamation. WAsUINOTOX, Nov. 1st.-The following is Cleveland's proclamation, designating Thursday, November 25th, as the day of thanksgiving and prayer: A PROCLAMATION BY TIlE PRESIDENT OF TILE UNITED STATES. It has long been the custom of the peo ple of the United States, on a day in each year especially set apart for th...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 13 November 1886

RIPPLE OF THE RAPIDS. aIr. Lyons is still alive but failing rap idly. F. N. McIntire, of Helena is a guest at the Park. H. O. Chowen returned from Helena 'Thursday. Miss Carter was a guest of Mrs. Phelps at the Park last Friday. Rev. H. E. Clewes will preach at the school house Sunday morning. A. Wareham and family of Stanford are stopping at the Park this week. Another saloon has been opened in the building formerly occupied by Wetzel. "HIidden Treasure," a California tale, will run through two numbers of the Trn UNE, commencing next week. Old Chinook came in stealthily again, Friday and licked up all the beautiful frosting from the hills hereabouts. The Rev. H. E. Clewes of Benton was in town this week looking up the stray sheep of his flock. Mr. Clewes may con clude to start an Episcopalian church here before long. We wish him success in all his undertakings. Jimmy Eastman informs us that a Mr. -McCabe has discovered a salt mine out near Box Elder somewhere. Jimmy is half owner i...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 13 November 1886

G(REAT FALLS TRIBUNE. BUILDING. (Continued.) Written for the Tribune. The first studs of the partitions are us ually set and the floors bridged before the roof is begun. In the short spans usual in country houses, this construction is a matter of little difficulty. Where support is needed it is generally obtained by car rying up the partitions wjiich extend from the firm foundation of the basement, and heavy trusses and purlins are rarely necessary, the weight being equally dis tributed over all the rafters, which may be tied with 'collars" of plank where re quired, at the same time the form of such roofs is often very complex and the fram ing-plans should be carefully and clearly drawn. Every ridge, valley and hip must be marked in plain letters, and the lengths of hip, valley, common and jack rafters should be calculated and written on the drawings. Without these precautions, the architect is very likely, during the framing to find a: hip substituted for a valley, or "i"e ve'r.so,...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Great Falls tribune. — 13 November 1886

MONTANA. We extr at the following from E. J. Stanley's "Sketch of the Topography, ie sources and History of .Montana," which will prove interesing to our eastern read -rs: It is estimated that thirteen millions of acres in Montana are covered with timber, that used for lumber, consisting mostly of yellow pine, black pine, "bull" pine, fir or spruce, and tamarack. The yellow pine is in more general use for all purposes. The fir is strong and durable and is used for framing for timbering mines, etc. The large mines that are being developed, the increase of railroads and other improve ments are beginning to lay quite a tribute upon our forests. This is the first great belt of timber on the Northern Pacitic west of Minnesota, and the first to be tap ped by the branches of the Union Pacific road, and already there are perhaps one hundred saw-mills in the Territory which turn out millions of feet annually to meet the increasing demand. Retail prices for lumber r:ange about as follows: Rou...

Publication Title: Great Falls Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
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