ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Cayton's Weekly Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 713 items from Cayton's Weekly, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
713 results
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 28 December 1918

will be heard no more, because the men who knew the old South, who knew the slave question, are passing and the coming gen eration knows nothing of these things. THE COMMON BURDEN (The Crisis) Ignorance and hick of sympathy are at the root of race prejudice. Until the one is re moved and the other awakened, there can be no real improvement. Development along ihcsc lines is needed more by the white man than by the black man. -J. L. Kesler says in the .1 hk i irtni City ; The Wgro problem, public or private, in dustrial or institutional, is, a human prob lem. Until we Pace the issue as human in its human relations; until we think of all citizens ;is human beings with human rights, human interests and human possibilities; until we insist upon equality of opportunity, economic, industrial, educational, equality before the law, equal sanitary provision, equal protection of person and property; until we become conscious of a common brotherhood and cease to exploit the weak and to treat th...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 28 December 1918

WORTH YOUR WHILE No, the Negro Business Mens Club of Seat tle did not demobilize at its last meeting, but, at the earnest persuasion of P. Frazier and Others, it voted to live on. The annual election of officers will occur at the next monthly meeting, the third Sunday after noon in January and it seemed to be the concensus of opinion of those present at its last, meeting that new blood be elected to the various offices, which in itself would be a fresh impetus for the motives of the or ganization. The club has been in existence two years and it has little, save having liquidated every obligation it contracted, to point with pride to, but its a long lane that has no turn, and this may be the turning point. Since the organization of the above league the .Japanese residents of Seattle by com bining their efforts as well as their money, have gained control of the hotel situation in Seattle. Yea, if they so desired they could close the doors of so many of the hotels of Seattle today that...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 28 December 1918

INDUSTRY (The Crisis) The two-story brick building, formerly occupied by the Citizens' Bank of Eliza ln'ili City, N. C, has been taken over by Negroes .it a cost of $10,000. The purchasers are ilif Home Deelopment Company, of which T. 11, Fleming is president. Some of the colored women at the pack ing houses. Chicago, 111., earn as hi^rh as $•">:>.oo per week; colored butchers often make ;is much as $!).<><> a day. At Paris, Ky.. colored women receied dur ing October ji <l;iy for cutting corn, $12.50 a week for breaking tow, and $12.00 ;i week in tobacco factories. The Tallassee Power Company, of North ( ;irolin;i. has established welfare work among Ihe colored people of Hadin, with two col ored workers. 11 luis been estimated that because of better treatment and higher wages, 10,000 Negroes Prom the South have been added to the population of Brooklyn, X. Y. One factory employs sixty colored workers; a man is getting #35.00 per week, and several girls < ■;11•...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 4 January 1919

J&uf#ck&^zijeAfa PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up. 1' A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates marie to clubs and societies. HOT?.APR ROSrOR CAVTON. Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, "Vash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. T *•- — -V- T*T! * "^Olff l«» 10 Office 303 22nd Aye. South OUR OWN HUNS It is most unfortunate that at the very time when the world is rejoicing at the de feat of the Hun and Hunnish practices, we should he slapped in the face, as it were, by the news of Hunism within our own borders. P>nt the plain truth of the matter is that in the southern section of this country there are disorderly elements that are disgracing the entire republic. This ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 4 January 1919

Montana is now bone dry and we *us peci the train porters running through there will not find bootlegging quite so profitable ;is they did when it was wet. High fever is now racking the body of former Kaiser Wilhelm. Doubtless he wants to (lie. but the good Lord will not accom modate him. It strikes us that Senator Lewis will have lo use a piaelm club instead o? liis sena torial whip to keep the senators from doing Wilson. SOME EMBARRASSING MOMENT One of the embarrassing moments of my life w;is. when 1 was a lad just eightet n years of age. Thai you can more' fully realize my discomfiture I was small for my age and had neither the apearance nor the strength of a man, though I Felt very much a man in my own mind. After having pass ed my eighteenth mile-stone I was exceed ingly anxious to go out with the ladies and at my lirst opportunity I was up and at a very handsome young lady, two years my senior and fully fifty pounds heavier than I. to go walking with me. She accepted my invita...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 4 January 1919

now recall them. Ten years later that cash ier Avas convicted of embezzlement and I Avent to the depot to see him start to the pen and I fear that mine Avas a look of triumph rather than sympathy, which should have been my Christian duty. On my way to Seattle, some twenty-seven years ago, 1 came by the way of Portland and stayed over all night in that city. My money pile Avas very low, but when I jjot oft' the train I thought I had twenty-five cents, for which T would pay for a bed and set out to find a lod<jin»>' house of "my size." But, presto change, when I felt for my quar ter is was only a nickle. I had a grip, but the clerk gruffly said, "that don't go," but I talked him into letting be go to bed. The next morning T got up and went to set a bite to eat on the nickel and verily did eat but when I Avent to pay for what I ate that darn nickel had disappeared. I knew not what to say. Finally I gave the fellow the check for my grip to hold for the nickel. I had purchased a sk...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 4 January 1919

War Prohibition The President anticipated the dosing or der provided in the War Prohibition measure by n few months. This measure, passed by Congress in November, w;is signed by Presi dent Wilson November 21. It prohibits the use of grain and fruits in the manufacture of liquor, effective .May I, 1!)!!), and pro hiltils the sale of all intoxicants, effective June 30, 1919. The manufacture of distilled liquor lias been prohibited since September, I!H7. The War Prohibition measure remains effective until the termination of demobiliza tion, which terminal ion is to be determined by the President. How Ion*? the period of demobilisation will continue, of course, no one knows, but the most optimistic liquor advo<-ale can't figure a wvy long lease of life Tor the beer and whiskey makers and sellers in the United States. I!" there is ;ui open period between the time when War Prohibition becomes effective by reason of the termination of demobilization and the lime when the National Prohib...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 11 January 1919

J@a///ch& PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men ami for "all men up. 1' A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACR RORCOR OAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entree! as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, "*Vash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TE" TIVWVfE : BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South HE SLEEPS IN DEATH Theodore Roosevelt, the strenuous, is no more. As he slumbered in the night lie quietly entered that "peace that passnth all understanding," and the mighty mnn of today was but a lump of clay of the morrow. Whether la rue or small, rich or poor, great or insigniflicant, all find that "in the midst of life is death." Truly a world character yielded up the phost, when Roosevelt closed ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 11 January 1919

EMBARRASSING MOMENTS In the year of out* Lord 185W I was em ployed by Richard Winsor of Seattle as city editor of the Gvening Call, a small daily thai advocated Populism as the pana cea lOr the political achea and ills of the citizens of this country. Judge Winsor is .-i blue bellied yankee from Michigan and was for ;i number of years connected with Ilie "under ground rail road" that aided es caped slaves to Canada, so his ideals as to the rights of colored folks were very pro nounced in their favor On Monday morn ing I showed Up ai the ('all's offices and .1 few minutes later Judge Winsor walked in and told his former city editor to turn over his keys to me, whom lie had em ployed to take liis place on the paper. Mr. Carpenter, the former city editor, showed no si^ns of disapointment, and after con ,i:ra!iihiiinu' me shook hands and walked out. In the composing and press rooms there were twelve workmen. The change of city editors soon drifted back to them und the new city editor wa...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 11 January 1919
Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 11 January 1919

REMOVAL NOTICE DR. DAVID T. CARD WELL wishes to announce the removal of his offices from the Pacific Block to SUITE 504 AND 505 MUTUAL LIFE BUILDING Corner First and Yesler Way Phone: Main 3433. represent the paper and thereby enjoy the courtesies that are to be extended to the press. Yon are a bit off color to pass for Mrs. Cayton, but you can get by at it, to which she readily agreed. Clothed with the proper credentials a new Mrs. 11. K. Cayton, left for Tacoma at 2 :1">. She pre sented her credentials and while the press committee did not refuse her, yet she heard one of then) say as she was leaving the room. "I'll bet a ten spot she is not Mrs. Cayton.'' but she had "a ho<>' killin time." Some weeks thereafter another press oc casion was pulled oil' in Tacoma and with the real Mrs. Cayton I was on hand happy as a lark. The same press committee had 1 charge of the visiting editors and after I introduced Mrs. Cayton the chairman of the committee said. "I am pleased to mee...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 18 January 1919

J@ai/tfch& I PEICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to chilis and societies. HORACE ROSCOR CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, ''Vash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. •ZT^KTT--">-vr.: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South THEODORE ROOSEVELT EULOGIZED "He was our riend", came from the churches of Seattle hist Sunday in relating the death of the late lamented Theodore Roosevelt. The Christian churches, regard less of denomination, claimed Roosevelt as their, friend because he loved his fellowman and for that, like Been Auben, his name lend all the rest. At the First Methodist church Mayor Hanson, with other disting...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 18 January 1919

EMBARRASSING MOMENTS While traveling from Ogden to Protland some ycnfs ;i'_;(). the train stopped twenty »11iim11 <'s for lii'Ci'ikl'nsl and the most of the p.isseii^ers look advantage of the opor iniiiiy. I had speiii many years in the West and my color had given me little or no trouble in getting the same accommoda tions in public places as were accorded to white citizens. With the other passengers I rushed into the dining room, but lest I niiuhl run up against a color prejudice snag, ! sal al an unoccupied table. I had been beautifully served and was doing my bil like an adept, when in walked two In dian men, though dressed in citizens at tire, they were big buck Indians just the same. They had no sooner entered that dining mem than I began to swell up for I Fell morally certain that the proprietor would seal them at my table and if he did I int( nded to show my American blood and either leave the table myself or insist that they he seated at some other table. While I sat ther...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 18 January 1919

DR. DAVID T. CARD WELL wishes to announce the removal of his offices from the Pacific Block to SUITE 504 AND 505 MUTUAL LIFE BUILDING to change the laws and the disregard of laws in Georgia and Alabama and Missis sipppi.. The fight for democracy for the natives of Africa is an international question and belongs at the peace table; if it is won, the Negro in the United States will reap many of the benefits of the victory. But the fight for democracy for the people of African descent in the United States is not an inter national question and has no recognized place at the peace table. It is not on the same plane as the question of rights for the natives of Africa and India and other de pendencies. The Negro in the United States is not a subject r.vje and does not accept the status of a subject race. He is a citizen of the United States, with all the rights of citizen ship guaranteed him by the Constitution. The fact that he is often denied these rights is aside from the point, he is, ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 18 January 1919

There were Negro players in the big league years nun. but the line was drawn. Darnell, ;i great catcher, worked in the big leagues in 1 11 < * olden days. Toledo once had ;i colored man who was declraed by many to l>e the greatest catcher of the time and greater even th;m his contemporary. Hiick Ewing. Tony Mullane, than whom no pitcher ever had more speed, was pitching for Toledo, and he did not like to be the battery partner of a Negro. "I had it in for him,*' Tony admitted, yens later. "He was the best catcher I t'vei' worked with, but T disliked a Negro and whenever I had to pitch to him I used to pitch anything I wanted without looking til this signals. One day he signalled me for :i curve and I shot a fast ball at him. lie caught it and walked down to me. " 'Mr. Mullane.' he said. 'I'll catch you without signals, bid I won't catch you if you arc going to cross me when I give you a signal.' , "And ;ill the rest of that season he caught me and caughi anything 1 pitched wit...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 25 January 1919

J&ufZchmzee&g /• PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. R. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal justice to til men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but In the main voicing the sentiments of the Coloied Htiiena Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rntps marie to clubs and societies. HOTJAPTC ROSOOR CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, 'Vash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. Office 303 22nd Aye. South THE SOUL OF A LYNCHER To the Editor of The New York Age: By some mischance a copy of your paper, containing a whole lot of abuse, insults and ill maners towards the white people of the South, fell into my hands. I read your paper with the same feelings and loathings that I would have had if I had held a cop per-bellied snake in my hand. My first im pulse was to throw the blame thing in the fire, but on second thought I ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 25 January 1919

l»rowI of the rolmvil citizens is due to illicil relations betw«m*ii white men and colored women hihl when you loathe them vnu ;iit lull lo;il hiiiii 1 yourself. Air. Smith, tinl above letter writer, we note. serins to be toiiilly l;i<-l<in<i* in the elements thai go to make up ;i gentleman, which of itself detracted nilleli from wluil lie ai teiupteil to sa.v. A gentleman is not only polite hut roil It eons to even ;i dog lllllell less to ;i colored person, inferior though he I.e. DOG EAT DOG Seattle is witnessing the most gigantic strike in ;ill her history. It has been under headway since lasi Tuesday and phase ul il is ;iikl 11; is I n \\;itelle<| houi^ly by all rhisses ol Seattle citizens. The workers seem !o be confident that it will be of short duration, hut the employers do not entertain ;i like opinion, and some of them express the belief thai il may last three months, and then nut m». ,-is those who are largely re sponsible for it. would have it do. If one hund...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 25 January 1919

CROIX DE GUERRE AND RARE PRAISE FOR AMERICAN NEGRO TROOPS A French army order, citing a complete Negro regiment for the Croix de Guerre, is ;i partial answer to questions, some of which have found their way into the Digest office, as to what the colored man has been doing for his country "Over There. M The regi menl cited, the 365 th Infantry of the 93rd Division, which is the old 15th Infantry of the National Guard of New York, is praised in these words by the French War Depart ment : Cnder command of Colonel Hay ward, wlio. tho wounded, insisted on leading his regi ment in battle: of Lieutenant-Colonel Pick ering, admirably cool and brave; of Major Cobb (killed), of Major Spencer (severely wounded), of Major Little, a true leader of men, the 365 th Reserve Infaniry. []. 8. A.. engaging in an offensive for the tirst time in the drive of September. 1918, stormed powerful enemy positions, energetically de fended, too. after heavy fighting, the town of S . captured prisoners, and brou...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 25 January 1919

to stay down. Those machine guns just kept right on pumping—-not the ones we captured, l)u t others. The wind they stirred up around your lace jest kept you cool all the time. I finally started back, but found myself in a German barrage. It was shrap nel in front of me and machine guns in back of inc. I lay right down and bad a heart-to-heart chat with St. Peter. I sure never did expect to get home again. "They say Edgeville ain't much to look at, but I would have given two months' pay, including allotments, to get back on my farm about then. But now that I've been there and come back I kind of feel that 1 'm square with this country. I did my share, and I'm glad 1 did it." "Yes, sir," interposed McKinney, "we all did our share and we are all glad we did it. This was democracy's war. The Negro troops assumed the burden of democracy along with the white and red troops. We did our share 1o keep America unchained, and we are all proud we did it. We are sure, too, that America will not ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 8 February 1919

.^^K '.^^m ",-^^r .^^^r .^^m .^^M 'J .^^^^ 4^B.»* J^r .^^K^^^ .^^^^^m .A ..Ha ,-^^^r ,^^w PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle. Washington. U. 8. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal justice to all men and for "all men up.'" A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACR ROSCOTC CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, ""Vash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TF-t:t»tt«ttE! BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South EDITORIAL PARAGRAPHS ■ When families first began to leave the East and come West they did so with many misgivings and reluctances. This state of mind trinkled down from the parents and reached the children. Once when a family had voted to give up its home in the East and seek a fortune in the far West, the little boy got down t...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
x
Loading...
x
x