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Title: Staunton Spectator Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 5,782 items from Staunton Spectator, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton spectator. — 18 June 1861

Stattttttit Sjetttoe ~tSbSaWj^^ Attention, Delinquents. Those who know themselves to be indebted to the "Spectator Office" for advertising or job ■work are most respectfully and earnestly request to pay up as sodd utfOwiWe. Bills' for job work are doe as soon as the work is completed, and for advertising as soen as the time for which ad vertisements were ordered to be published ex pires. Any time given on such bills is an indul gence to the person owing them. -i -' ■ ■ The two Heroines, Misses Kerr and McLeod. The two noble heroines, Misses Abbie Kerr and Mary McLeod, of Fairmont, Marion County, who rode from tbeir home to Phillippa, a dis tance of thirty-odd miles, to apprise our forces tbere of the approach of the enemy, arrived in SUunton, by the Western train, on Wednesday i night last, And remained till Friday morning, wben they went to Richmond. Whilst here, they were the "observed of all observers," and were received witb a cordial welcome. Great anxiety was manifested by all...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton spectator. — 18 June 1861

A Very Fine Farm ii t'ulpeper County, FOR SALE. I OFFER for sale tbe Farm on which I reside, "Cole's Hill," one of the most valuable estates in the county. This farm contains about 750 Acres, _. of which about 500 are arable, and the bal- L ■finance heavily timbered. It lies ""•on Mountain Run, which passes through within two and one half to three miles of Brandy Sta tion, on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, from which point the cities of Washington, Alexandria and Richmond, can be reached in about three hours. It is well watered, every field having never-failing Springs. Tbe soil is of the best quality, producing fine crops of wheat and corn, and luxuriant crops of grass. The location is beautiful and proverbial for health. Two Manufacturing, and two Grist Mills are within a few miles. Churches of the various denomi nations are of easy access. The Buildings are all new, and of the best kind. In fact, it combines all the advantages of a first class Farm; in its fertility of soil,...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton spectator. — 25 June 1861

Starniicn Spectator, i STAUNTON.VA. TUESDAY. JnE 25, 1861. Attention, Dclinqnents. Those who know themselves to be indebted to the "Spectator Offioe" I>r advertising or job work are most respectfully and earnestly reqaest to pay up as soon as possible. Bills for j»-b work are due as eoou as tbe work is completed, and for advertising as seen the time for which ad-1 vertisements were ordered to be published ex pires. Any time given on ench bills is an indul gence to the person owirg tbem. Reaction in tan Monti. The sober second thotght of the people of tha North is beginning to have its effect, and tbe desire for peace is beginning to manifest itserf. Such sentiment} are beginning to be expressed in lowa, Connecticut and New Jersey, and it •will not be long before a very palpable reaction will be exhibited in all of the Northern States. Tbe sensitive pocket nervw is beginning to twitch a'-d will soon bo in spasmodic convulsions. They lia*e vow 100,000 troop j in tbe field, at au ex...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton spectator. — 25 June 1861

Molly Pitchers iv the South. We have seen a letter from a young lad} in Tennessee, to a youug lady friend in this city, in which she says, 4 'be sure that tbere are many thousands of Molly Pitchers in the South, who, it circumstances shall require, will be found on the tented field defending our altars and our homes." This allusion to Molly Pitcl.er brings to mind one of the most heroic incidents con nected with the history of our Revolutionary war with Great Britain. The celebrated Molly Pitcher distinguished herself at tbe battle of Monmouth, <>f which Headley, iiTb'is "Life of Washington," gives the following account: "It was during this part of the battle (when Gen. Lee was struggling nobly against tbe over whelming numbers that pressed on him) tbat an Irishman, while serving his gun, was shot down. His wife, named Molly, only twenty-two years of age, employed herself, while he loaded and fired his piece, in bringing water from a spring nearby. While returning with a suppl...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton spectator. — 2 July 1861

Stolen .Spectator. ~ ™ ;STA!7NTON,VA. ;f UESi'ATi ■JVH 2, IMI. t ■ - _ ' ■. ■ ,r AUeutioff, Delinquents. Tho4 who kn f* them -elves to be indebted to the »«/eotHt»r Office" f.r advertising or job work mt most r* spectfullv and earnestly request to pas-up as kmhi as possiMe. Bills for job work are'dne as soon is the w >rk is completed, and for advertising »a soen ac the time for which ad vertisements were ordered to be published ex pires.; Any tim > given on such bills is au indul gence to tbe per on owing them. Staunton Militia Called into Service. By order of Maj. GenfLee, Maj. M. G. Har man, Commandant of this post, called into the service of the State the whole of the militia 01 Staunton, comprised in the Companies A and B. These Companies were received into the service of the. State on Saturday last, and on Monday (yesterday) they proceeded to the election of Office/3, which resulted as follows: In Company A.—Philip H. Trout, Captain; Moses Strickler, Ist Lieutenant; and T...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton spectator. — 2 July 1861

TERMS. E3?~ Ihe "Spectator" is published once a week, a Two Dcllars and Fifty Cents a year, which may he dis charged by the payment of Two Dollars at any tun within the year. No subscription will be discontinued but at the option of th* EditO'. until all arrearages are paid. A J VEtiTISEMENTS of ten lines (or less) inserted once for one dollar, and twenty five cent* for each subse quent continuance. Larger advertisements inserted in the same proportion. A liberal discount made to those who advertise by the year. Annual advertiser* will be limited to their im mediate business, or the advertisements charged for at transient rates. Professional Caro*, not exceeding seven lines, will be inserted one uear for $7 00—6 months for $4 00. OnbSquark, (lolines) ..1 year $10 00 6 months 6 00 " " 3 " 400 TwoSquabm, 1 year 15 00 " " 6 months 10 00 m » 3 " 6 00 Thbb* Squares, lyear 18 00 " " 6 months 12 00 " " 8 •' 800 One-Third Column, 1 year 25 00 M 1 SaMtrtfa 18 oO " " ....8 " 1200 One Column, ...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton spectator. — 9 July 1861

Stannfra ifyttkint. STA'JKTON.VA. TUESDIY, jrLI 9, 186!. Attention, Delinquents. Those who know themselves to be indebted to the "Spectator Office" for advertising or job work are most rB-pectfuliy and earnestly reqnes*- to pay up as soon as possible. Bills for job work are due as soon as the work is completed, and for advertising ?° soon as the time for which ad vertisement wero ordered to be published ex pires. Auy time g?ven on such bills is an indul gence to the person owing them. Brilliant Victory—(ial Inn try of the Augusta Tolnn eers. It is with very great pleasure that we an nounce a glorious victory acheived cheifly by the heroic bravery of th_ Augusta boys. On Tuesday morning last, a portion of tbe sth Vir ginia Regimeat nader the command of Coi. Har per, witb the Artillery Company of Cant. Pen dleton of Rockbridge and a company (Continen tal Morgan Guard) from Winchester, numbering in ail only 380 men, met the enemy, supposed to be about f JOOO, six miles from Martinsbnrg...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton spectator. — 9 July 1861

_itautttoii J^.dafflr. RKHARD '_ APZ_TEdit«r &Proprietor TERMS. ■ ! Ihe "Spectator" is published once a week, Two Dcilare «nd Fifty Cents a year, which may he dis'' ch'trr/ed by the payment cf Two Dollars at any tim within the year. No subscription will be discontinued but at the option of tlv* Editor, until ail arrearages are paid. A J VERTISEMENTS of ten lines (or less) inserted once for one dollar, and twenty-five cents for each subse quent continuance. larger advertisements inserted in Vie same proportion. A liberal discount nvide to those who advertise by the year. Annual advertisers will be limited to their im mediate business, or the advertisements charged for at transient rates. Professional Cards, not exceeding seven lines, will be inserted one year for $7 00—6 months for f4 00. One Square, (10 .m--) ..lyear $10 00 " 6 months 6 00 " " 3 " 400 Two Squares, 1 year 15 00 " " 6 months 10 00 " " 3 " 600 Three Squares, 1 year 18 00 " " 6 months 12 00 " " 3 " 800 One-Third Col...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton spectator. — 16 July 1861

Stattttlra : Sjertator* STAQNTON.VA. TtJESI* \Y, JULY 16, 1861. Atfeatlon, Delinquents. Those who know themselves to be indebted to the "Spectator Offloe" for advertising or job work are most respectfully aod earnestly request to pay up as soon as possible. Bills for job work are due as soon as the work is completed, and for advertising as soon as the time for wbicb ad vertisements were ordered to be published ex pires. Auy time given on such bills i. an indul gence to the person cwirg them. frW° Io our absence,, persons wish ing to settle accounts due the "Specta toi*" Office can do so by calling upon Mr. J. Addison Waddell, who is authorized to receipt for us. A Few Words to our Subscribers. We bave been determined to issue the tator v a. long as we could possibly do so, wheth er at a profit or loss. Until we had furnished three soldiers trom onr office for the army, we continued to issue a whole sheet, and since then we have continued the publication of the paper by issuing a hal...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton spectator. — 16 July 1861

Staunton J&pdator. : I3F~ Ihe "Spectator" is published once a week, Two Dollars and Fifty Gents a year, which may be dis'" charged by the payment of Two Dollars at any tim within the year. No subscription will be discontinued but at the option ofth* Eiitor, until all arrearages are paid. A J VERTISEMENTS of ten lines (or less) inserted once for one dollar, and twenty-five cents for each subse quent continuance. I/irger advertisement* inserted in the same proportion. A liberal discount made to those who advertise by the year. Annual advertisers will be limited to their im mediate business, or the advertisements charged for at transient rates. Professional Cards, not exceeding seven lines, will be inserted one year for $7 00—6 months for $4 00. One Square, (1.-W-e.) ..lyear $10 00 " *' 6 months 6 00 " " 3 " 400 Vwo Squares, lyear 15 00 " •• (> months 10 00 " " 3 '• 6 00 Three Squares, 1 year 18 00 " " 6 months 12 00 ■ M 3 " 800 One-Third C01umn,....1 year 25 00 - '« 1800 " ? ' ...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton spectator. — 20 August 1861

Statuttca Spectator. I STACNTON.VA. TUESU .V. AUG. 20, 186 LLj Pay Taxes Willingly. j a We know tl at tie patriotic citizens of this • good old county who bave already done so much ' for the defence of the honor and rights of 'he South will not uUer a munner of complaint when the tax gat borer calls for their proportion : Of contributions to tbe dafe' cc of the South.— j They teel, as is wvll expressed by the Btobnoad j.' Enquirer that -all we all that we val j j ue, and all that is dear to v., are at stake. A people who number twenty millions have j blown the w_r bugle, and bave already resolved i l to devote aa am.) of half a million of mcD, and < a trea-ure of five handred millions of dollars, to our destruction. We have called npoc Heaven * and drawn the sw .rd, and vowed to defeat them or die. It is a vow and a resolution that enno- ' ble onr Confederacy, and will be recorded on one of the most glowing of historic pages. It is ac ennobling vow, only because it is not an idle...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton spectator. — 20 August 1861

Ihe "Spectator" is published once a week, a Two Dollars and Fifty Cents a year, which may be dis charged by the payment of Two Dollars at any tim within the year. No subscription will be discontinued but al the option of th* Editor, until all arrearages are paid. A J VERTISEMENTS of ten lines (or less) inserted once for one dollar, and twenty-five cent* for each sul-se queat continuance. larger advertisements inserted in the same proportion. A liberal discount made to those who mlvertise by the year. Annual advertisers "Kill he limited to their %m --mediatt business, or the advertisements chary ed for at 'transient rates. Pbofusmonal Caro ~ not exceedimi mm lines, will .c inserted >ne <,cur- for #. 00—4 ./*<'... As fo> £4 00. Ox« Sqoabb, (i linex ~\ftar flO Ov) •' •' timo?tks 6 00 -' " ...» " i ■■'<■ r > wo Sv<;a_._x ..ljtfM* 15 00 •* - ....<; wnth* ■; « v " 8 " .. Thsre Squaeks, lyear 13 00 '• " & : mcnth* 12 00 " " 3 " Onk-Thi an Coi-Bjur, 1 year ... £5...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton spectator. — 27 August 1861

Staußlca Spectator* | STAONTON.VA. TCESifvY, Alto. 2T, IS6I. toi. Baltf-Tin** Speech. 001. Job ti 13. Baldwin < ..liv'ared a speech of an hour's length in the Court llrise on Monday (yesterday) in behalf of tl o comforts of the 52nd regiment of Virginia vola iteers, of wbich he ha? been appointed commant. int. He stated that that regiment w>.3 greatlj in need of blankets, socks, shins, dnwers, . vercoats and wcolen clothing generally—that t-iese articles could not ba had in the markets, ai' that they Bhould be , supplied by the god people of this county. He ■, was satisfied that the libera!, generous and pat- j r.otic people of tbis county had both the means and the disposi ioa to supply the soldiers of this oounty with every article they needed. He j spoke with much earnestness, manifesting a deep and heart-felt p. licitude for the comforts and health of the soldiers place 1 undir his command. His speech, though no attempt at the pathetic ■ was made, moved the hearcs of many ...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton spectator. — 27 August 1861

RI(HIR D M APZT JMJUor;4! TERMS. *^* > Ihe "Spbctatoh" is published once a week, a Two DclUrs and Fifty Cents a year, which may be dis charges by the payment of Two Dollars at any tim within tlie year. No salscription -will be discontinued but al the option of th* Editor, until all arrearages are paid. A J VERTISBMENTS of ten lines (or less) inserted once tor one dollar, and twenty-five c...... for each tubse -o'ierd continuance. larger adveqtisem >tts inserted t.i the same proportion. . A liberal discount made to those who 'idverlise by the year. . . 33P Annual advertisers v/ill be limited to their im mediate business, or the advertisements charged for at transient rates. ... Professional Cards, not exceeding seven lines, will be inserted one year for $7 00—6 months for $4 00. O.vs SQUARE,(IO..Ties) ..1 year $;0 00 " " 6 months 6 00 « «« 3 " 400 Two Squares,...; lyear 15 00 » •• & months 10 00 «« « I '• 600 Three Squares, lyear 18 00 ■« - I months 12 00 « »« 8 " 800 One-T...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton spectator. — 3 September 1861

tON.VA. SEPT. 3, 1861. A Favarable Sign. The outrages committed throughout the Nor thern States in the violer.t efforts to suppress any expressions of sentiments in opposition to the tyranry of Lincolniam, by the demolition of such presses as know their r ghts and dare to main tain them, furnish the most conclusive evidence i that there is a feeling of opposition to the farther prosecution of Lincolr's a t holy war pervading the masses of the people of that section which inspires as much dresd iv the minds of the ty rants at Waihington as the masked batteries of the ''rebels," the very thought of which makes their knees knock together with more violence than did those of B_L_hazzar when he read his doom in the mystic hand writing on the wall.— The tyrants know that the rights of the people have been ruthlessly vb hit ed, that the ocnstitu tion has beeu trampled uuder foot, that the most sacred bulwarks of freedom have been destroye \ and that they would be justified in rising in tbe...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton spectator. — 3 September 1861

NOTICE. feY THE GOVERNOR OF VIRGINIA. The Executive of Virginia, by authority ot the Con vention and of the General Assembly, has, Iroin time to time, accepted the patriotic servi ces of the gallant sons of tbe Commonwealth who have cheerfully rallied to ber defenoe, and volunteered to protect the interests of the Con federate States. These men, under every incon venience and hardship, murmur not. There is tbe greater propriety in anticipating their wants and in ministering to their necessities. The Government of the Confederate States is making every effort to provide all the troops with the clothing £_ud Quartermaster and Commissary stores necessary for their comfort and sustenance. Hut feeling it to be an obligation on the part of Virgiuia to see that her own volunteers are am j>ly provided for, l have thought it a duty, which 1 take pleasure in performing, to use ever.- exer tion to have an ample supply of requisite clo thing. 1 therefore, ou behalf of the State, invoke all c...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton spectator. — 10 September 1861

_i. aunt en Spectator. STAV/NTON.VA. North and St. nth. The Richmond Whig say* that''no people who respect tbemsel/es can desire association with the Yankee race-no State that cherishes inde pendence can trn-t its fortmv s to Yankee govern ment. One by one the bulwarks of State sover eignty, and the muniment of individual liberty, have been destroyed, till nothing remains worth preserving. A reign of terror prevails in the Yankee States, and those subject to them, as complete, if not yet quite •* violent, as swept ] over France in the days of Robespierre. As one of their own jniinals rem irks, it requires but one step more to inaugurate the scenes of the French revolution, when tlie guillotine was a perrennial fountain of blood. Men and womea are daily arrested in Wash ington, New York and Philadelphia (.ays a co temporary, summing up the atrocities of the usur pation,) and thrown into loathsome dungeon?, "without wa-raut of law, and without being con fronted with their accusers or ...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton spectator. — 10 September 1861

Disloyalty of Free Speech.—We find the following editorial in the New York Day Book of AugQ9t 26 : But it is said we are "disloyal." Disloyalty ! —what is it? To be "loyal" must we believe in "the irrepressible conflict" of Seward, "the ne gro equality" of Chase, the "ultimate extinction" theory ot Lincoln, and that the Helper book is a "valuable politioal document ?" Must we believe that Seward is as great a statesman as JetfersoD, that Cameron is as incorruptible as Diogenes, and that Lincoln is as learned as Machiavelli ? Must we believe tbat black is white, that two and two make five ? In fact, must we commit intellectual suicide ? Does Mr Lincok's Admin istration demand all this as the price ot "loyal ty ?'' If so, the price exceeds onr ability to pay. But it is said we oppose the Government. — How, where or when? Bring on your accusers; let the c*ae be brought before the court. Let us see the counts and the specifications. If to be "loyal" means sincere reverence for the Const...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton spectator. — 17 September 1861

Stannic*. J§|cttator. STAO'NXON.VA. TIJESn f . «filT. 17, 1861. ,_ >in- - .... •'. — ——-—. --- Hospitality to Soldiers. Before sufficient Loapita .accommodations bad been provided in'tfcie place, onr kind took the sick soldiers to their homes to be nurs ed and properly attended. S,>me have suffered I greatly by so doing, yet so great is tbeir *ympa- j thy for the soldi, rs and so self sacrificing their patriotism that"they do oot regret their kindness j to tho soldiers ibocgh it I as caused some of them to mourn the loss of dear relatives and has inflicted wounds of tbe heart which lime, can never beal. A« an Instance, we will mention that some time since a number of sick and wounde 1 soldiers arrived here from Gen'l Garoett's com mand. Capt. John H. Ast of this place seeing tbat there were i<3t prope hospital accommoda tions, and feeding desirous to do all he could for the unfortunate soldiers whose condition elicited the warmest sympathies of his heart, he took four of th...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton spectator. — 17 September 1861

Confessions of Weakness.—The indiscrimi nate arrests made by Lincoln, of men and wo men, are so many confessions of weakness. Some of the arrests are made—that of Mr. Faulkner, "for example—simply to have an offset against the Confederates, for tbe security of the Aboli tionist Ely. Other arrests—that of Mr. Johnson, for instance—because he happens to be a neph ew of Gen. Johnson, of the Confederate army. It is supposed that near relationship will make Gen. Johnson feel, even when the military arm ot Lincoln cannot reach himself. Others are ar rested in order to extort money; the olject be ing confiscation. The arrest of women :s surely the last confession of weakness. Miss Maria J. Windle got a slender living by writing letters from Washington tor the Southern press. She is a clever woman, smart aud showy, and her sympathies, it seem?, are with the South. For this she is arrested. Mrs. Philip Philips is the talented and lovely wife ol 001. Philips, formerly of the Charleston bar, s...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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