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Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 August 1897

Poultry Yard. PRESERVING EGGS. There are two ways of preserv ing eggs. One is a dry procees and the other a pickle. While the re sults obtained from either process are about the same, the dry method is the better one, because when eggs are kept in a liquid for any length of time they are sure to absorb more or less of the odor of the liquid, causing an unpleasant taste in the egg. A dry, fine sand, finely sifted coal ashes, dry salt, clean dirt, or any of the small grains, will answer for a packing material, but care must be taken that the ma terial used be dry. If eggs are packed in a moist material they will mould and will therefore be unfit for table purposes. Fine dry sand or salt, we think, gives the best re sults. Eggs should be packed with the small end down, and, if it can be done, it is a good plan to pack in boxes and turn the eggs by in verting the box occasionally. If the eggs are greased very slightly before packing it will avoid evopo ration. This can be done by mak in...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 August 1897

\2 ¥hs Hpiary. BUZZINGS. MRS. CHARLES I.HK. It is not profitable to keep old or defective queens. Re-queen imme dately. The purity of the Italian bee is determined almost entirely by the markings of the workers. It you find it troublesome to keep the grass killed in front of your bee hives, just try sprinkling salt around plentifully. Mr. Horton, of Zillah, wishes to know from what source the bees gather so much New Orleans mo lasses ? The color is very much like molasses, but is honey-dew. In taking off supers too much smoke at entrance will drive the bees up in the super. Shaking and thumping is liable to break down the honey, causing loss. Better use some good bee escape. Sweet clover is one of the best honey producing plants in the world. It yields honey everywhere, and the flow lasts not days but weeks. The honey is light in color, of fine flavor and good body ; in fact, a fair rival for white clover. Keep your uncapping knife sharp. If your honey is warm, dip your uncapping kn...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 August 1897

Swig© Dspartmsnt. HOG RAISING.-No. 3. BY W. A. HART. For the first week alter farrowing feed the sow about one and a half gallons of milk or thin sweet slop from the kitchen twice per day. if you have it, as it is less liable to cause indigestion and fever. The lack of this can be imperfectly supplied by thin slop, lukewarm, made of water and thinned with three-fourths bran and one-fourth shorts. Use a little salt in the slop. Gradually increase the quantity and quality of the slop fed to the sow to the fifth week, when she may have all the rich slop she will eat. It is never advisable to feed hogs or more than twice per day, except pigs may have a light feed of thin slop or milk at noon, but no solid food. Milk fever, caused by im properly feeding the sow, will in jure many of the pigs to the ex tent that they will never make prof itable feeders. The sow may have a little wheat or half ear of corn twice per day when the pigs are two weeks old, and gradually in crease until when pig...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 August 1897

H TROUBLES OF A FUR DEALER. A representative the other day dropped into the office of Hibbard & Norton, who conduct one of the larg est houses dealing in pelts, furs, etc., at Seattle. While conversing in terestedly with the members of the firm there came in a rather small, middle-aged individual with a land otter skin under his arm. "Dese ist de finest skin you almost over seen," he said, and he went on to explain volubly its points of value to Mr. Hibbard. "Ah, its no good," said Mr. Hib bard curtly, and then asked: "How much do you want for it?" "I take youst five tollars for it. It cost me dot in trade at mine store." "Give you four dollars for it." "O, mine gracious ! I lose money on der goods. Let me wrap dot up. Igo to Isaacteen; he vill not rob me so!" The little man grabbed up a piece of paper and proceeded to wrap it up with all haste. He worked a little slower when he com menced tying the string. He started for the door, saying: ''I vas going!'' "Well, go on; no one w...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 August 1897

- FOREST RESERVE REGULATIONS. Under date of July 30th the de partment of interior issued a circu lar covering the regulations adopted for governing the different forest re serves. From this circular is copied rule 13, which affects the reserves in Washington and Oregon as fol lows: The pasturing of live stock on the public lands in forest reservations will not be interfered with, so long as it appears that injury is not being done to the forest growth, and the rights of others are not thereby jeopardized. The pasturing of sheep is, however, prohibited in all forest reservations, except those in the states of Oregon and Washington, for the reason that sheep grazing has been found injurious to the forest cover, and therefore of seri ous consequence in regions where the rainfall is limited. The excep tion in favor of the states of Oregon and Washington is made because the continuous moisture and abund ant rainfall of the Cascades and Pa cific Coast ranges make rapid re newal of herbage...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 August 1897

i 6 H Jp^ POLSONWILTON HARDWARE CO. _ _ 11 ll ss*^^ 821-823 Western Avenue, /i^T/i\\\\ fMC^ — ' Seattle, = = ■ - - Washington. N \il/mb\ yM£j^lM{ Wholesale ami Retail; UJw^V^ll^f "^^ PARM MACHINERY jj/J!^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Wagons, carriages, haying tools —^L£/ j/$}$ y harvesting machinery, field and Deering Ideal Mower, Roller and Ball Bearings. garden Seeds. PlimpS, Wlild MHIS, &C. You Should Not Forget that We are Headquarters for FARM IMPLEMENTS AND SUPPLIES SUCH AS — Machine Oil, Binding Twine, Hay Forks, Scythes and Snaths, 5 and 1O Gallon Milk Cans. We Guarantee Both Quality and Price! Yal*:i:moL Hardware Co« 9 Successors to Fred Pennington = - - North Yakima, Washington. Creameries, Dairy Butter Makers, Cheese Makers, Fruit Growers! We are Northwestern Agents and Headquarters for the Following Linesi Stewart's Corrosive Sublimate Tablets for Preserving Composite Milk Samples for Malx-nck Tesi, Are Hccuriite because each jarhus the same amount of preservative to v urniu. Conven...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 August 1897

Ranche and Range. Old Skries, Vol. 3, No. 52.1 north A I 7" TAT A wash., august 19, 1897. New Series. Vol. 1, No. 19. f NURIH YAKIMA, WAC3±I., AUOUSI i», io»/. HELP YOUR NEIGHBOR ALONG. It is to be regretted that in many of our rural dis tricts there exists a feeling of jealousy which should not be there. Why should any farmer, or any one else for that matter, be jealous or entertain any thing but a kindly feeling toward his brother in the same line of business —yet it is no uncommon thing to see farmers living on the same street, whose farms join each other and whose families should be on the best of terms, who do not speak, and if the opportunity presents itself, will do each other all the damage they possibly can. If these people could only see how foolish this principle looks to an out sider, they certainly would banish the feeling of en mity. Life is too short to have enemies; we haven't time to deal with them. What if we do have to ac knowledge we are wrong sometimes, or what ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 August 1897

2 HO^TICULtTU^E. HORTICULTURAL TIPS. BY CHAS. S. SIMPSON. Now is the time to keep an eye on the orchard, whether newly planted or an old bearing one. Do not allow the trees to suffer from drouth. Turn on plenty of water and allow it to run until the soil is thoroughly moistened, remembering of course that the necessary amount of water depends upon the character of the soil. Trees growing on land of high, gravelly nature require an abundance throughout the growing season, while trees growing upon land more or less influenced by sub-irrigation would re quire little or no surface water. The writer has observed a considerable amount of wormy fruit in the orchards this season and would advise removing it from the trees every day. The hogß will enjoy eating it, if no better use for it can be found. Geo. IT. Winstock, Orillia, Wash., is planning to erect an evaporator of good size to care for the fruit crop of his and neighbors' orchards T. F. Brew, commission merchant, a tireless rust ler...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 August 1897

HORTICULTURAL NOTES. Pay some attention to things which make life pleasant, and the business of money making will not prosper any the less, and the wife and the children will like the farm better. Do not growl over a veg etable garden nor scowl at flowers; once see the yard bright and you will not go back to the old or der of things. If you have an attractive houseyard you will be the first to boast of it to callers. There can hardly be considered any best time to prune. In some conditions one time is best, and in others another. The growth and condition of the trees, the object to be procured, with other things, must always be considered. Thumb and finger during the summer .and a sharp knife during the winter are all that should, in ordin ary circumstances, be needed to do necessary prun ing. The best rule is never to remove a branch with out good reason. All kinds of flowers, except the amaranthus fam ily, require very rich soil to do their best in. Do not hoe beans when they are ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 August 1897

4 APIARY. BUZZINdS. BY MRS. CHAS. LEC. Is honey an animal or vegetable production? Hot water when used as a drink is more palatable if sweetened with honey. Propolis can be completely removed from cloth ing by rubbing the soiled portion with a small piece of ice.—Gleanings. In leveling the hive, the eye cannot always be de pended on, especially if the ground is sloping to one side. It pays to use a spirit level. Bees, when building comb, level their work, and if the hive is not in line with the vertical frame build ing, the comb will not be fastened to the bottom of the frame. I was very much pleased to see Bro. Berg's article in the August 5 issue of this paper. No drone buzz about that; a regular worker's buzz, which means business and right to the point. In cleaning and scraping hives and frames, there will be quite a quantity of propolis and wax all mixed together. Separate by putting the mixture into a pail of water and stir well. The wax will rise to the top, the propolis sett...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 August 1897

POULiTf*Y. THE HEN AS AN ADJUNCT. Passing through the country the observing trav eler is impressed with the low estimate placed upon the hen. Many only have a very few, and these are Jeft to shift for themselves, roosting in trees and out of the way places, and yielding returns just about equivalent to the care taken of them. As an adjunct to dairying, the hen, properly treated, cannot be over-estimated. The reasons for this statement will readily present themselves to the thoughtful man. In the first place, the hen will find a way of utilizing many of the by-products of dairying. Skim milk these fowls will devour by the gallon. So with buttermilk. Without question, milk fed to hens will yield a readier and more profit able return than in any otherwwar.} r. Then, too, butter and eggs go well together when it comes to marketing. How many times when sell ing butter is the call made for eggs! A.few chickens taken along in the fall of the year find ready sale and add to the family exche...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 August 1897

6 THE DAlt^V. "HAYSEED" HEARD FROJI. The following letter has been forwarded us and after some consideration we have concluded to pub lish it. We had no idea there were so many people interested in the dairy question around Yakima City as our little discussions have stirred up. A community creamery is a public enterprise and all patrons are directly influenced by its welfare. This is a pretty "warm" letter and if any injustice is done we will be only too glad to correct it. So here goes: Mr. Editur: Wall I see your peace in your papur about Mr. Bartlett's creamery and what he sed about us fellers and our cows. And I seen that peace about our pastures. Wall that was purty good. But I think ef Mr. Bartlett don't know any more about runin cows nor he does about runin a creamery he wouldn't do eny better nor us fellers are doin. I think it would be a good thing to if some feller woode cum here with some cract up bulls, and then he ought tew bring a good creamery outfit along, and a fell...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 August 1897

DAIRY NOTES. At the burning of Oak Grove (Minn.) Creamery, which occasioned a loss of about $6000, the hand en gines are said to have used cream to extinguish the flames. A cow need not necessarily be high-bred to be a good dairy cow. On an average it requires eleven pounds of milk to make one pound of gain on a calf. It is well to remember that a kicking cow cannot be cured by harsh treatment. Kindness is the only remedy. English breeders want a law compelling owners of cows that have aborted to mark them so they cannot be sold as sound stock. There is one advantage in dairying when a good quality of product is made; the product is not affect ed to any great extent by the fluctuations of the market. If in the pastures there are no shade trees, or not enough to protect the herd from the scorching sun, see to it that some kind of shade is at once provided —a shed, for instance, or several of them if needed. No one should he allowed to do the important work of testing the milk of diff...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 August 1897

s Ranche and Range. ISSUED EVERY THURSDAY. In the interests of the Farmers. Horticulturists and Stockmen of Wash ington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Utah and British Columbia. Official organ of the Northwest Fruit Growers' Association, embracing Washington, Oregon, Idaho and British Columbia. Subscription (in advance) - - - - . ■ $1.00 per year MILLER FREEMAN - - " Editor Address all communications to No. 108 West Marion street, Seattle, Wash. Branch office at North Yakima, Wash. Commencing with this issue the type for RANCHE AND RANGE is set up by machines. Because of this fact we are going to request all our correspondents to observe two or three simple rules. First of all, be careful to write on one side of the paper only. Try to write as clearly as possible and with ink, although the use of a pencil is not objec tionable if pains are taken to make the characters distinct. Before sending copy in. always look care fully over it yourself and make it as nearly free from mistakes as poss...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 August 1897

DE LAVAL "ALPHA" CREAM SEPARATORS'^ .a^^ i&Sti&L CREAMERY AND DAIRY MACHINERY AND SUPPLIES what ttie 1897 Wlsoonsln State Experiments ®l*ow« tiS^-^kZz^ That many " Alpha De Laval " machines in every-day use are skitmniug as wonderfully IBfe^SP'^ fy close as .03; that the average is from .05 to .065; and that but one machine out of those per- Bilj^n- I/*f sonally tested by Prof. Farrington was leaving more that .1. " . &fJ£mg&m JMI rff\ That the "Reid-Danish " machines are leaving an average of three times as much fat in SSSipS oUziMjA the skim milk as the "Alpha De Laval." . 2 ■&££_, That the U. machines are DAIRY average of three times as much tat W_r»«.t **xc 1887 Wlsoonsin «B»tc_te> _£__i*_rl*:r_.e>M.t_a S_»_r_.o^ws That many " Alpha De Laval " machines in every-day use are skimming as wonderfully to close as .03; that the average is from .05 to .065; and that but one machine out of those per /// sonally tested by Prof. Farrington was leaving more that ....

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 August 1897

IO THE FLOCKS. HERDING SHEEP. It has been the custom in many communities to poke fun at the occupation of herding sheep as one that is akin to the laziest job in the world. The poor sheepherder has been the butt of ridicule from one end of the ranges to another. Good sheepherd ers have always commanded good pay, for a good herder is not met with every day. There are lots of men who think they can herd sheep. A week of it convinces them and their employers they are not adapted to the work. A good sheepherder has to be a man of some judgment and lots of patience. While his labors are not the hardest from the standpoint of manual work, he has to exercise more or less judgment in the selection of feeding places for his flock and care against bad weather. It appears now that after all these years of abuse and ridicule the position of sheepherder is to be sought after by people who do not have to accept that kind of work for the pay that is in it. The occupation is said to offer a cure fo...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 August 1897

CONGRESS AND SUGAR BEETS. Secretary of Agriculture Wilson, speaking of the increased tariff on sugar, says: "I am glad of it. It will be a good thing for the country and will insure a more rapid development of the beet sugar industry . I am glad of anything that will shorten this payment of the hundred mill ion dollars we are now making to Germany and other countries annually. lam sorry the sugar bounty was obstructed. That would have been a splendid thing. The McKinley bounty was a good thing and would have proved a splendid institution if it could have been left alone. The result would have been that we would be now producing our own sugar. "This beet sugar proposition is coming to the front as a living issue. The farmers of the country are getting intensely interested in it. There are 22,000. of them now growing beets for tests, and it is my opinion that Congressmen in the future will hear from the farmers on this subject." CROSS-BREEDINO. Cross-breeding of meat-producing animals...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 August 1897

12 THE BOHSB. TO TELL THE AGE OF HORSES. To tell the age of any horse, Inspect the lower jaw, of course; The six front teeth the tale will tell, And every doubt and fear expel. Two middle "nippers" you behold, Before the colt is two weeks old; Before eight weeks two more will come, Eight months the "corners" cut the gum. The outside grooves will disappear From middle two in just one year. In two years from the second pair; In three, the corners, too, are bare. At two, the middle "nippers" drop; At three, the second pair can't stop. When four years old the third pair goes; At five, a full new set he shows. The deep black spots will pass from view At six years from the middle two. The second pair at seven years; At eight the spot each "corner" clears. From middle "nippers" upper jaw, At nine the black spots will withdraw. The second pair at ten are white; Eleven finds the "corners" light. As time goes on, the horsemen know, The oval teeth three-sided grow; They longer get, project bef...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 August 1897

SWlfiE DEPA^T^E^T. HOa RAISING— 4. ■ V W. A. HART. But little confidence can be placed in any inex perienced person's ability to successfully treat the hog after he is seriously affected with disease, and especially with internal treatment, that has to be administered by drenching, etc. Any slight ail ment may be successfully treated internally so long as the hog will eat, and the medicine can be admin istered in the feed; but when he once passes beyond this stage it is seldom profitable to bother with him. It is very essential to the health of the hog that he has plenty of pure water accessible at all times and that impure water be not accessible at any time. Many object to ringing the hog, but it is better to ring him than to have stagnant wallows made by him. If he needs a wallow, to prevent his being overcome with the heat, make a box large enough to accommodate him, sink it in the ground and fill it with water. By putting posts in the ground and making straw sheds in the lots, ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 August 1897

14 SUnriER APPLES POOR SALE. The following letter from a well-known Seattle com mission firm is of particular interest to all fruit growers: Editor Ranche and Range: We beg leave to en croach on your valuable space in order to place before your many readers the present state of the fruit market in this city. At the present time apples are a complete drug, and only the most select stock will sell at any price. There are several causes for this state of affairs: First, an unusually large crop of fruit all over the state; second, nearly every retail house in the city is supplied by the farmers and fruit men in their vicinity each morning and at prices that outside shippers can not compete with, while at the same time the commis sion houses are being filled with fruit from outside shippers, which they cannot move. We would suggest that only highly colored, well packed, fancy apples, such as are used by fruit men, be shipped at present, or until the market improves, and then only in smal...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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