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Title: United States Catholic Intelligenc... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 765 items from United States Catholic Intelligencer, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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[Selected for the Catholic Intelligencer.] THE IRISH PEASANT TO HIS PRIEST. [Newspaper Article] — United States Catholic Intelligencer — 2 March 1832

[Selected for the Catholic Intelligencer.] THE IRISH PEASANT TO HIS PRIEST. by THE AUTHOR OF THE “ OHARA FAMILY.” Air —“ Alleen Aroon; or, Erin, the tear.'” Am I the slave they say, Soggarth aroon ? Since you did shew the way, Soggarth aroon, Their slave no more to be, While they would work with me ; Ould Ireland’s slavery, Soggarth aroon. Why not her poorest man, Soggarth aroon, Try and do all he can, Soggarth aroon. Her commands to fulfil, I Of his own heart and will, Side by side with you still, Soggarth aroon ? | Loyal and brave to you, 1 Soggarth aroon ? Yet be no slave to you, Soggarth aroon— Nor out of fear to you, Stand up so near to you — Och ! out of fear to you 1 Soggarth aroon ; Who, in the winter’s night, Soggarth aroon, When the cold blast did bite, Soggarth aroon, Came to my cabin door ; And, on my earthen-floor, Knelt by me, sick and poor, Soggarth aroon ? sWho, on the marriage day, Soggarth aroon, Made the poor cabin gay, Soggarjh aroon—■ And did both laugh and sing...

Publication Title: United States Catholic Intelligencer
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
A new, valuable and interesting Work. PROPOSALS FOR PUBLISHING BY SUBSCRIPTION THE UNITED STATES CATHOLIC REPOSITORY. [Newspaper Article] — United States Catholic Intelligencer — 2 March 1832

A new, valuable and interesting Work. PROPOSALS FOR PUBLISHING BY SUBSCRIPTION THE UNITED STATES CATHOLIC REPOSITORY. Containing an historical account of the first introduction of the Catholic Religion into the United States of America—its progress, and present state; I with a particular description of all the Diocesses from their first creation down to the present time ; including a detailed account of the various Catholic establishments connected with them, as Missions, Colleges, Ecclesiastical Seminaries, Convents, Public or Charity Schools, Principal Churches, &c.—in which will also be exhibited the true faith of Catholics in I contrast with the belief and principles falsely imputed to them by sectarians generally; with a complete [ answer to all their aspersions and calumnies, presented in so clear and easy a manner, that the most illiterate Catholic will be able to repel his opponents, and justify his attachment to his faith. Particular notice will also be taken of...

Publication Title: United States Catholic Intelligencer
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 184 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — United States Catholic Intelligencer — 2 March 1832

CABINET WAREHOUSE. NUGENT respectfully informs his friends and the Os! public, that he has taken the Store, No. 25, Cornhill, (late Market Street) where he keeps on hand, a first rate assortment of Cabinet Furniture ; together with a variety of Live Geese Feathers and Bedding, which he intends to sell at fair prices. *** He makes and repairs ah kinds of Cabinet work, and will feel grateful for any patronage bestowed on him. Jan. 6. DANIEL HERSEY, ATTCTIONSER, 113 PAS taken a Counting Room, No. 10, Exchange Street, ais—k and will in future devote his whole attention to cut door sales, such as Real Estate—Vessels—Household Furniture—Grocery Stocks and Merchandize of every description in any part of the city. Grateful for the past, he hopes by his assiduity and attention to the interest of his employers, to receive a share of the public pasronage. Orders left at his Counting Room will meet with prompt attention. N. B. The Weekly Sale of Horses, Carriages, Harnesses, fee. at the Horse M...

Publication Title: United States Catholic Intelligencer
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — United States Catholic Intelligencer — 9 March 1832

UNITED STATES CATHOLIC INTELLIGENCER Ei o osog i/tfsg <rig xodT ; — si deus pro nobis, quis contra nos ?—ip god be for ‘us, who is against us ?—hum. viii. xxxi. VOL. 111. BOSTON, FRIDAY*, MARCH 9, 1832. XO. XXIV. TTWITED STATES PUBLISHES BY HENRY L. DEVEREEX, FOR THE PROPRIETORS. Terms—-3 dollars per annum in advance. All communications must be post paid, and addressed to fhe Editors. • Oiice 32 Congress Street. THE INTELLIGENCER. BOSTON, MARCH 1832.

Publication Title: United States Catholic Intelligencer
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
IRELAND. [Newspaper Article] — United States Catholic Intelligencer — 9 March 1832

IRELAND. . POLITICAL UNlON—January 4. A meeting of the Union took place on Tuesday at the Corn Exchange. Maurice O'Connell, Esq. M. P., was called to the chair,, and Dennis M’Carthy, Esq., requested to act as Secretary. On tha proposition of Mr. O’Connell, Mr. Patrick Finn, of Carlow, was admitted a member of the Union. The Learned Gentleman here read a letter from Mr. Richard Dowden Richard, of Cork, a Protestant Dissenter, and proposed the writer’s admission as a member. •The motion was carried, and the letter directed to be inserted on the minutes. Mr. O’Connell also proposed the following gentlemen as members ;—• Messrs. Dmiel Laffin, Kilturkey, county Tipperarv; Rev. Win. Ladin, P. P., Holvcross, Thurles; j Thomas Fisher, Carlow, and Mr. John Magrath. Mr. Lawless then moved to have the following Rev. Gentlemen admitted members of the Union :-P. Kennedy, Vicar General, Parsqnstown ; T. Spain, P. P., Larrah and Durrow; P. Cleary, P. P-, Kilcolman ; P. Powel, C. C., Kinnatty ; J. ...

Publication Title: United States Catholic Intelligencer
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
PRESENT STATE OF IRELAND. [Newspaper Article] — United States Catholic Intelligencer — 9 March 1832

PRESENT STATE OF IRELAND. The London Morning Chronicle of the 27th Dec. has sprrkeh of the state of Ireland in the following liberal terms;— “The position of Government with regard to Irei land is one of very great difficulty, and we fear ministers will soon jiave cause to lament their not having conciliated Mr. O’Connell. During the whole of last ! session, and indeed since the reform question was first i agitated, Mr. O’Connell rendered them the moat important services, and, independent of every other consideration, policy prescribed the attaching such to I their standard. The-influence of Mr. O’Connell in Irelahd must always render it much more easy to govl;ern that country with his aid than his opposition. This is the language of the Dublin Evening Post, i j even while preparing to enter the lists against him : i “ It is needless,” says that journal, “to reiterate the! regret which we then felt, and feel still, that Mr. ’ O’Connell was not placed in-a position in which his; i ta...

Publication Title: United States Catholic Intelligencer
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
TITHES IN IRELAND. [Newspaper Article] — United States Catholic Intelligencer — 9 March 1832

TITHES IN IRELAND. It is stated that Dr. Butler of Burnchui'ch, who was so piteously described by Mr. Stanley, as compelled to sell his horses and advertise his carriage, and reduced to a state little superior to that of all the Evangelists put together, is a prosperous.gentleman, “ a man of immense wealth !” A correspondent of The. Waterford Chronicle mentions another sort of case ; Mr. Stanley produced examples of clerical distress in proof of the necessity of reforming the tithe system ; but fhis person takes his example of suffer--1 ing from the tithe-paying class. It is not an affair of | selling horses—the poor creatures would have ate one —nor of advertising a ca'rriage-r-the advertisement duty would have kept thepi from famine for a month i —nor is it a case of keeping only one servant—they themselves would have jumped at the most menial drudgery, and could not keep the wolf from the door, nor the parson from the wretched -raiment that served more for decency than protection...

Publication Title: United States Catholic Intelligencer
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
FORCED ECONOMY. [Newspaper Article] — United States Catholic Intelligencer — 9 March 1832

FORCED ECONOMY. The French Ministers have been defeated in the Chamber of Deputies; they wished to grant a Civil List to Louis Phillippe of fifteen millions of francs, when M. Odillon Barrot and his friends out-voted the Ministers, and granted him only twelve millions, being less than half the amount enjoyed by Charles X.

Publication Title: United States Catholic Intelligencer
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
BELGIUM AND HOLLAND [Newspaper Article] — United States Catholic Intelligencer — 9 March 1832

BELGIUM AND HOLLAND On the Belgian side matters look as if they would not be taken unprepared ; and as the parties, if they do come to blows, will tyieet this time upon more terms as to preparation, the issue may not be quite so favorable to the Dutch as it had been before, and they confidently anticipate it will be now. The people of Brussels were still in great alarm, fearing an attack from the Dutch. The Minister of War issued fresh orders, commanding an obedienceto the order of the day for the return of the men on furloughs to their regiments.'

Publication Title: United States Catholic Intelligencer
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Conduct of Calvinistic Prussia to the poor Poles, [Newspaper Article] — United States Catholic Intelligencer — 9 March 1832

Conduct of Calvinistic Prussia to the poor Poles, The accounts from Leipsic, of thp 2<jth of Dec., give a most deplorable and brutal account of the Prussians towards the unfortunate Poles, in which they state that on the 11th inst., the Prussians suddenly surrounded the Polish troops to the number of twelve thousand men, and wanted to force them, in a most brutal manner, to obey the orders of Russia; the Polish soldiers were repeatedly struck with the Prussian muskets, and the officers were indignantly treated and threatened to be shot, but they still continued firm, and declared that they would suffer the most barbarous treatment, sooner than comply with orders which were against the laws of humanity ; this decided resistance caused the Prussian Commander to send for fresh orders from his Government. The Pofes demanded passports to enter France.

Publication Title: United States Catholic Intelligencer
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Private Interpretation of Scripture. [Newspaper Article] — United States Catholic Intelligencer — 9 March 1832

Private Interpretation of Scripture. During the reign of Charles I. private fasts were much practised. A lady declared, that she had nearly lost her life through a prevalent notion, that no fat person could get to heaven, and thus wasted her body by excessive fastings. An unfortunate Quaker, to prove the text that “ man shall not live by bread alone, but by the word'of God,” persisted in refusing his meals. The literal text proved for him a dead letter; and this practical commentator died .by a metaphor.— Curiosities of Literature. I Charles 11. of England died a Roman Catholic. The folj lowing particulars are from the pen of the Clergyman who attended him in his dying moments. Upon Thursday, the sth of February, 1685, between seven and eight o’clock in the evening, I was sent for in haste to the Queen’s back stairs at Whitehall, and desired to bring with me all things necessary for a dying person. Accordingly 1 came, and was ordered not to stir from thence tilt further notice. Bein...

Publication Title: United States Catholic Intelligencer
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
CHURCH OF ST. PETER, AT ROME. [Newspaper Article] — United States Catholic Intelligencer — 9 March 1832

CHURCH OF ST. PETER, AT ROME. About 1000 years after the building of the ancient ba-ilica, Nicholas V. peeing it threaten ruin' beyond reparation, formed a plan for a new one, which was so vast and magnificent, that Vasary says he esteems U better to cover the design in silence, th;in to describe it; but this Pope’s life passing away in projects, Julius 11, took the matter seriously to Jieart, and having found several able architects, San Gallo, Balias, Peruzzi, Raphael, and Brarnante, he chose The last, and demolished half of the old basilica. Michael Angelo Bonorota, then young, was called to Rome by Julius, to erect his sepulchre, and loudly complained, on seeing the noble pillars erected by Constantine broken without care. He levelled a part of the Vatican hill, and by the Popp’s orders, shut in the sepulchres of the irtartyrs within the new building. On the 18th April, 15C6, (being - Ddm. in albis) Julius laid the first stone. ' In raising the chapel of Sextus-IV. Michael Angel...

Publication Title: United States Catholic Intelligencer
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
PULPIT ITEMS. [Newspaper Article] — United States Catholic Intelligencer — 9 March 1832

PULPIT ITEMS. The following lac9nic Sermon was delivered by a | minister in Wales; its brevity owing to his multipli-| Ed cares, as Pastor, Husband, and Father, is not its least recommendation. , • “Naked came I out of my mother’s womb, and naked shall I return. —Job, chap. i. verse 21. In discoursing on these words, 1 shall observe to you the three following things : First, man’s ingress into the world ; secondly, his progress through the world ; and thirdly, his egress out of the world. First, man’s ingress into the world is naked and bare. Secondly, his progress through the world is trouble and care. And thirdly, his egress out of the world is nobody knows where. If we do well here, we shall be well there. I could tell you no more, were 1 to preach a whole year. *• Now to, &c.”

Publication Title: United States Catholic Intelligencer
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
BOURDALOUE. [Newspaper Article] — United States Catholic Intelligencer — 9 March 1832

BOURDALOUE. In one of the sermons, which he preached before the monarch, Bourduloue described with infinite eloquence, the horrorsuf an adulterous life, its abomination in the eye of God, its scandal to man, and the public and private evils which attend it: but he managed his discourse with so much address, as kept the king from suspecting, that the thunder of the preacher was ultimately to fall on him.—ln general, Bourdaloue sjjpke in a level tone of voice, and with his eyes almost shut. On this occasion, having wound up the attention of the monarch and the audience to the highest pitch, he paused. The audience expected something terrible, and seemed to fear the next word.—The pause continued for some time. At length, the preacher, fixing his eyes directly on his royal hearer, and in a tone ol voice equally expressive of horror and concern, said, in the words of the prophet, “ thou art the man ■” then leaving the words to their effect, he concluded with a mild and general prayer to...

Publication Title: United States Catholic Intelligencer
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
ON SAYING MASS IN LATIN [Newspaper Article] — United States Catholic Intelligencer — 9 March 1832

ON SAYING MASS IN LATIN The following observations upon the advantage of faying Mass in Latin, may not be uninstructive to j many of our dissenting brethren. Even friend Mal--1 colm himself, from whom we cannot hear, may de- ! rive benefit from it. In a Dialogue between a Protestant and a Catholic. P. What oan you know of religion, when your priests preach and pray in a foreign tongue, in order 1 to keep you in ignorance 1 C. Preach in a foreign tongue ! Neither you j nor I ever knew a priest such a fool, as to give a La|tin sermon-to an English congregation. They say | Mass, indeed, in Latin ; but we, laymen,' have it incur books in English, and loilow the priest in the prayers throughout. The Clergy want to keep us ignorant, do they ? P. —(fretfully)—But why do they read.in Latin at all 1 C. .1 will tell you then. In the first place, you must know that the Catholic Church looks upon it as a matter of perfect indifference in itself, what language her service is performed in. Hence,...

Publication Title: United States Catholic Intelligencer
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
LENT. [Newspaper Article] — United States Catholic Intelligencer — 9 March 1832

LENT. (CT 5 ” For the information of .distant Catholics residing in the Diocess of Boston, we are requested to re-publish the regulation for the present Lent. 1. Flesh meat is allowed on all Sundays throughout Lent, without restriction as .to the number of times. »\ 2. And once a day only on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays, the first and last weeks excepted. 3.. Hog’s lard is nut allowed on days bn which flesh meat is prohibited. 4- Eggs, butter, cheese and milk are allowed on all days. • IdP” Subscribers who are indebted to us for Books, or for “ The Jesuit,” or Catholic Intelligencer,.are hereby requested j to pay up all arrears to .our Agents in their immediate vicinity, or fransrait them, post paid, to the Editors of the Catholic Intelligencer. Such subscribers seem to forget the heavy weekly expenses we have to meet, and that we have no other funds or menus of doing so, than what the subscription moneys fur- | nish. We labour gratuitously in of Truth, and have been for the last...

Publication Title: United States Catholic Intelligencer
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
ITALIAN POETRY. [Newspaper Article] — United States Catholic Intelligencer — 9 March 1832

ITALIAN POETRY. Modern history has established the fact that clerical studies had prepared the restoration of letters by the preservation of manuscripts, mostly discovered in the dust of monastic libraries. The copies of the works of antiquity soon began to spread and produ-: ced erudition, that for a long while was expressed in latin, as no people thought their own language stamped with a power to embody the productions of the mind. Poetry alone had boldly ventured on some rude essays which resembled the lisping of infancy. Two men, however, appeared before the discovery of printing, who were so fortunate as to give celebrity to their country by works composed in their native idiom— Dante and Petrarch, of whom Italy can justly boast, as of a proof that among the modern languages, its own was first brought to perfection, arnf in barbarous times, the love for the arts peculiarly prevailed in its bosom. Among the obligations which all the modern nations owe to the Italians, and mostly...

Publication Title: United States Catholic Intelligencer
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
[From the Defender.] THE MARCH OF INTELLECT. [Newspaper Article] — United States Catholic Intelligencer — 9 March 1832

[From the Defender.] THE MARCH OF INTELLECT. A SHANDEAN DIALOGUE. Dr. Slop. This is a wonderful age we live in Capt. Shandy. We are continually making the most surprising discoveries, and most astonishing improve- | ments in every thing. Look now, the whole world i is alive; every thing is turned topsy-turvy. Old I things are passed away—old things have become new. We are unriddling all the phenomena of Najture, making metaphysics as plain as day and driving ion crescendo in all departments as Mr. Finn says. “ Every thing does go by steam now.” Parson Cuffcushion said in his sermon under his j 13th general head, that the march of intellect was the grand characteristic of the age in which we live. Uncle Toby. If I remember right Paul Pry says' something to the same effect. Dr. S. Paul Pry was rather of opinion that the age was rather characterized by a spirit of inquiry. Uncle T. Well that is pretty much the same | thing. Every thing is found out by inquiry. It is! the grand pioneer ...

Publication Title: United States Catholic Intelligencer
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
NOTIONS. [Newspaper Article] — United States Catholic Intelligencer — 9 March 1832

NOTIONS. This is truly an age of inventions ; from the first January ISJI to first December 18-JI, five hundred and focty patents have issued from the Patent Offiae. How many are of any practical use is another matter.

Publication Title: United States Catholic Intelligencer
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
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