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Elephind.com contains 313 items from Free-Lance, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 17 March 1906

8 RARE I BOOKS \ QUEER QLJAINT i !■ ( CURIOUS VIETT'S OLD & NEW BOOK SHOP 243 CHURCH ST., NORFOLK, VA. We BUY, SELL and Exchaga Connaeted with Laadlng Saeond-hand BOOKS af Old Beak Shaps af Evary Description. AMERICA ARD ENGLAND . Otfkee. WHERE the GOOD CLOTHES COME FROM 310-312 Main Street. Pick out the Best Dressed people and follow them to this store. We Fit You Right! hi Great Bona Fide ReWe Treat You Right! II! duction Sale Now On r~ WOOD and COftL C. B. WHITE & BRO. \ | Brambleton Ava. and N. AW.R. R. £ | WE SERVE THE PEOPLE ) Once a Customer always a Customer ([ > FULL MEASURE and j PROMPT DELIVERY S. ’Phone 1054—5. B. Phone ’IIIS UT-iiiJiJTrmnjTJiJTiTmTJxnjijTjij^^ I XI? 0 Dispatefyj 2 Norfolk’s Leading Afternoon Journal b Largest Circulation. § 5 Bast Advertising Results. p ? Most Attractive News Display. 5 5 Covers the Field of All Competitors q And Fills Every Requirement of p LTho Twentieth Century Newspaper p mjxnxuTjTiiJUTjijTjxrtAJUi...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 24 March 1906

Vol. 11. No. 53. CHAMPION OF LABOR, FRIEND TO THE MASSES. Says the masterful Peter Bayne,—“Would rough common sense, when set on its guard, be apt to be blinded by cajolery or fawning? Were it impossible to awaken electors to a feeling of the emptiness of mere talk, and train them to a habit of comparing words with actions? Is there not spread widely such a measure of intelligence among our working men, and the general body of our freemen, that they could, especially if urged and instructed, inform themselves of the past life of their proposed representative, and judge whether, from his bearing in what spheres he has occupied, he has the heart, the head, the arm of a man ?” The action of the assembled representatives of labor last Monday night in not nominating a candidate for the board of control, evidenced a spirit antagonistic to that consistency and harmony that ought to characterize public assemblies called together for a specific purpose. Labor unionism in Norfolk has been her...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 24 March 1906

2 THE NORFOLK BUGHOUSE CLUB The weekly meeting of the Bughouse Club was held on Wednesday night at the headquarters on Church street. Two new members were initiated and one selected for honorary membership. The membership now numbers eight earnest souls who stand by their opinions with all the fervor of their bughouse persuasion. They are a cheerful lot of pilgrims and the sessions are worth coming miles to hear. Among the crowd is an ex-editor of inexhaustible information, a couple of anarchists who are always enthusiastic on the subjects of red riot and ruin, a mild-mannered man of melancholy temperament who moralizes extensively upon the depravity of humanity on the outside, a flat-earth theorist who supports his contentions with books and maps and untiring logic, and Files, the carpenter, whose last resort is to give everything a “scant sixteenth” and let it go at that. One great object of this organization is the shattering of bogus reputations. Logic and criticism flow like th...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 24 March 1906

||if wn ■ if '■ ; j mm “ Latest pilgrim to the shore of life’s restless sea.” PREFACE To “Impressive Passages of Power and Beauty, in Prose and Poetry.” Forthcoming Publication of George F. Viett. In llie labor of love which has found a partial attainment in the pages which follow, the compiler feels a certain pride in the assertion that the incentive has not been altogether the item of pecuniary profit. Rather has the task been prompted by the desire that others should share the pleasure of the illustrious companionship that has so often cheered and blessed him on his literal y pilgrimage. It is, in a measure, a labor of reverence and restitution, an appreciation of benefits bestowed, and an act of devotion at the shrine of idealism in which others may share. In the language of the eminent Croly—‘‘l longed for an opportunity of contributing my mite to the solid possessions by which posterity is wiser, happier, or purer, than the generation before them: —some trivial tribute to the ...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 24 March 1906

4 Tfte Free-kattce Subscriptions, Payable in Advance. ONE YEAR SIX MONTHS »0 THREE MONTHS PUBLISH BID EVERY SATURDAY FOR SALE ALL OVER Address all communications to 243 Church Street. “Faith,” says one of the most damaging of the infidel philosophers, “is the subjective error of mankind.” The force of this sentence is well nigh overpowering, and might be quite so, were it not that by the same process of reasoning the very philosophy by which he reaches the conclusion could be likewise explained away, and hence every evidence of life and destiny, of nature and being, resolved into the mere phantasms of a momentary Error deluded into a belief of his own existence, and passing at last into the nothingness from whence it came. It is passing strange that the powers of intellect should be applied to the task of proving itself but brother to the clod, and yet the legions of this hopeless creed are numerous and their efforts untiring. It is not our purpose to enter upon a discussion of so t...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 24 March 1906

|L * - -V o ur && r y THE UNAPPRECIATIVE SAVAGE A contemporary characterizes the action of the Philippine Moros in feigning death and killing the medical men who come to their relief, as the “brutal ingratitude of savage warriors.” It is an unthoughtful characterization. These benighted heathens in their crude elementary way may argue the matter somewhat like this: “This is our country, the land of our birth and the birthplace of our forefathers. Our forefathers have fought the white intruder for two hundred years. They have left us a heritage of freedom and a legacy of hate, we are freemen and we prefer death to the yoke of the white stranger. We will fight and kill them to the last. We ask no quarter and we give none, the white man knows our mode of warfare, and being constantly the aggressor must take his chances. We do not want him to bind up our wounds, the wounds he himself has made. Let him bind his own wounds, not ours. If he attempts to do so we will...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 24 March 1906

6 GOD’S MUSIC. Since ever the world was fashioned, —Water, and air, and sod, — A music of divers meaning Has flowed from the hand of God. In valley and gorge and upland, On stormy mountain height, He makes Him a harp of the forest, He sweeps the chords with might. He puts forth His hand to the ocean, He speaks and the waters flow, Now in a chorus of thunder, Now —in a cadence low. He touches the waving flower-bells, He plays on the woodland streams, A tender song like a mother Sings to her child in dreams. But the music divlnest and dearest Since ever the years began, Is the manifold passionate music He draws from the heart of man. F. E. Weatherly in “Temple Bar.” GUILLIELMUS REX. The folk who lived in Shakespeare’s day And saw that gentle figure pass By London Bridge, his frequent way— They little knew what man he was. The pointed beard, the courteous mien, The equal port to high and low, All this they saw or might have seen, But not the light behind the brow! The doublet’s modest ...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 24 March 1906

Will Successors of Norfolk Railway and Light Company Make Good ? A newspaper item has appeared to the effect that there is in prospect a change of management of the business of the Norfolk Railway and Light Company. It is hinted that the whole business may be leased to another company. These matters of financial and commercial manipulation are so easily arranged that it would surprise nobody to hear of the “lease” of the monopoly’s holdings. Under such circumstances the question that would interest the Norfolk public would be as to the validity of certain contracts between the city, the Norfolk Railway and Light Co., and its successors. Would we get dollar gas, and cheaper electric power and six street car tickets for a quarter? The people will watch developments with peculiar interest. The new concern might resent the “philanthropy” of its predecessor. It might claim “impossible” conditions, and by enlisting the many friends of monopoly on its side on the plea of “standard of servi...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 24 March 1906

8 •££ ! BOOKS 1 «««. VIETT’S OLD & NEW BOOK SHOP 243 CHURCH ST., NORFOLK, VA. We BUY. SELL and Exchage Connected with. Leading Second-hand BOOKS of Old Book Shops of Every Description. AMERICA AND ENGLAND WHERE the GOOD CLOTHES COME FROM 310-312 Main Street. Pick out the Best Dressed people and follow them to this store. We Fit You Right! Great Bona Fide ReWe Treat You Right! II duction Sale Now On | WOOD and COAL ~~| | C. B. WHITE & BRO. | | Brambleton Awe. and N. AW.R. R. \ \ WE SERVE THE PEOPLE > Once a Customer always a Customer > FULL MEASURE and PROMPT DELIVERY | S. S. ’Phone 1054—5. B. Phone ’llls |[ uxiUuxnnjT.ruxnjTjnjrminnjTJxnn^ jjfye Dispatel7l 5 Norfolk’s Leading Afternoon Journal 5 Largest Circulation. C Best Advertising Results. p P Most Attractive News Display. b 5 Covers the Field of All Competitors q £ And Fills Every Requirement of P LThe Twentieth Century Newspaper h IJTJTJTJXmTJXfUTJTJTJTJTJTJIJIJXrUTririnJTiIJXriJTJ...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 31 March 1906

wB- *‘A chap’s among yon takin’ notes f Vol. 11. No 54 THE CONTEMPLATION OF VIRTUE AND GREATNESS. Those who enjoy the privileges and power that accrue from the profession of politics should be circumscribed by conditions and limitations through which the public might gain light upon the motives that inspire their political actions. A candidate for public office should be compelled to reveal to the public, in a public manner, his exact standing in the business life of the community. Any man who would not care to so reveal his affairs would have to relinquish his political ambition. The candidates, especially those aspiring to councilmanic seats, should be compelled to state and publish under oath with what business concerns they are connected, their stockholdings in public service corporations, and the number and value of their real estate holdings. With the people fully informed upon these points, it might operate to deter the personal interest motive on the part of ambitious counci...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 31 March 1906

<■> lie service, but he did so, brethren, because “the best interests of the city” were involved, and these alone, needed the saving voice and vote of Umstadter, and Umstadter followed where duty called. Umstadter loves the public and would do anything for their best interest. If Umstadter owned a piece of property in brick that was a menace to human life, we may safely count that he would immediately have it razed. If Umstadter owned a piece of property on a public thoroughfare that had been let by his agents to improper characters, for “the best interests of the city,” and in the name of public decency Umstadter would turn them out, even though the monthly rent was promptly paid. If Mr. Umstadter is the owner of the brick house on the north side of Plume street one door from Church —on which point we are not certain as we have not consulted the records —we would inform him that it is generally known as “The Hole in the Wall,” and besides being a menace to the...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 31 March 1906

and its people know the war is over. You have had a good long rest and like the man up the tree you have been able to observe things without getting hurt. Your memorandum book should be full of notes and your ammunition in prime condition. You should begin by giving a few blasts at “cradle Democracy.” “Cradle Democracy, my friends,” said the Hon, Hugh G. Miller, coining the phrase before a large Northern audience as reported by a New York paper, “is that form of Southern political persuasion having for its motto, “I was born in the Democratic cradle, I was reared in the Democratic cradle, and I will die in the Democratic cradle.” “You see my friends they never get over the cradle stage.” Continuing in this humorous strain, Mr. Miller is reported as follows: “Old man Swink who used to whittle sticks and squirt tobacco juice at a cross-roads grocery store was one of these ‘cradle Democrats.’ The boys used to call him ‘barnacle’ because he stuck bravely to his post in that store for th...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 31 March 1906

4 Tfte Frse-kance Subscriptions, Payable in Advance. ONE YEAR 51.75 SIX MONTHS 90 THREE MONTHS 50 PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY FOR SALE ALL OVER Address all communications to 243 Church Street. OPPRESSORS OF THE WIDOW AND ORPHAN The widow and the orphan are sacred creatures in the eyes of real men. Many excellent beneficial and fraternal orders make the care of the widow and orphan their special concern. Any semi-decent creature will sacrifice his greed where the widow and the orphan are concerned. The creature that oppresses them is a foul bird of prey indeed and should be branded for the miserable wretch he is. The rental laws of Virginia require that a tenant give one month's notice of intention to vacate the premises. The average tenant is too poor to lay any plans for the future and is frequently compelled to take the tide that serves and move without notice. To the honor of many of our Norfolk rental agents the collection of a month’s rent in lieu of the notice is rarely pressed, ...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 31 March 1906

HI Jt T P P llk^ pany would be to grant a franchise to an outsider, the agreement being that the present rates hold good so long as the city forbids competition by denying franchises. The city has not bound itself to not grant a franchise, it simply accepted the proposition of the monopoly, and in order to make its acceptance of value, turned down the Fentress franchise. Another city council, strictly within its rights, may grant a franchise and thus nullify the proposition of the monopoly. There is ample evidence floating about that pressure upon candidates in the coming councilmanic election will be on that point. If we are correctly informed, it is the intention of Mr. Fentress to keep up the fight for his franchise and to make of it an issue in the approaching contest. In this he will be supported by a majority of the voters of the city, the sentiment being largely anti-monopolistic. The sentiment among the people at large is competition, and competition at any price, and this f...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 31 March 1906

6 PAIN. I am a mystery that walks the earth Since man began to be; Sorrow and Sin stood sponsors at my birth, And Terror christened me. More pitiless than Death, who gathereth His victims day by day, I doom man daily to desire for death, And still forbear to slay. More merciless than Time, I leave man youth And suck life’s sweetness out; More cruel than Despair, I show man truth And leave him strength to doubt. I bind the freest in my subtle band; I blanch the boldest cheek; I hold the hearts of poets in my hand And wring them ere they speak. I walk in darkness over souls that bleed; * I shape each as I go To something different; I drop the seed Whence grapes or thistles grow. No two that dream me dream the self-same face; f No two name me alike, A horror without form, I fill all space— Across all time I strike. Man cries and cringes to mine unseen rod; Kings own my sovereignty; Seers may prove me as they prove a god— Yet none denleth me. —INDEPENDENT, DEATH. I am the key that parts...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 31 March 1906

That he was a recent importation, duty paid, was plain to see. His sentences flowed in a creamy brogue and he spoke the American language with a foreign accent. He was born in London without his consent and had traveled all the vast distances of the continent of Great Britain. He had seen better days, but he had not forgotten them. His education had been neglected for the sake of his mind and he was pompous without being oppressive, and he rolled in on us one day this week. “Ah, me dear fellow,” said he, addressing the Editor. “Might you direct me to a respectable furnished apartment at a nominal figure. I should like to find lodgment within ’ailing distance of the business section. I ’ave tramped me boots off trying to find a decent domicile and everybody looks like they only just moved in or were getting ready to move out. It is sickening; and they prices they arsk! Two dollars! nigh half a pound, for a beast of a room and a man required to black his own boots at that!” We explain...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 31 March 1906

8 as aech form was printed, and for the same reason the author was unable to print more than six hundred copies. The work lias been an expensive one, to say nothing of the actual labor Involved in its mechanical production, and the price of $1.50 for plain copies and $2.00 for autograph copies is the least at which it can be sold. It is questionable if a work of such size and intrinsic value was ever published in so small an edition, and it is reasonable to expect that the copies will never be worth less than their first cost. Fully half the edition is already subscribed for, and the author extends his thanks to these subscribers who have so readily contributed to the return of an outlay he can ill afford. It is necessary, however, that all the copies be placed in the shortest possible time, and the subscriptions of those to whom a copy of this notice Is sent is earnestly solicited. The assurance is given that they will never regret their investment. A postal card order addressed Ge...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 14 April 1906

Vol. 11. No. 55. Six Tickets for a Quarter—But With the advent of the festive Spring we get six tickets for a quarter on Manager Hathaway’s trolley runabouts, that is providing. The method by which these tickets are sold to the public is unique, happy, and entirely original. It is an arrangement indeed which we contemplate with much cheerfulness. As a concession that don’t concede it takes the pound cake. As a beautiful example of monopolistic cuteness it is charming. Manager Hathaway and the push behind him deserve all the credit and they are getting it. The patient public is going along apparently satisfied but growling like h —l. And the growlers are daily growing more numerous, too. Councilman Burke, whom some joker advocates for the Board of Control, isn’t saying a word. Councilman Burke is one of the gentlemen to whom the public is indebted for this limited and localized ticket sale business. He has helped make a botch of the business and we fear his inability to cope with so ...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 14 April 1906

2 THAT NEW CHARTER AND THE BOARD OF CONTROL The legality of the new city charter is now seriously in question, and there is talk of testing its validity in the coints. We sincerely trust that this new instrument will be put through the third degree of criticism and have focused upon it the light of publicity. The putting through of this chatter, whether it be good or whether it be bad, constituted an affront to a people calling themselves self-governed. Several people get together for some months behind closed doors, formulate a code of municipal regulation whereby a hundred thousand citizens must be governed, this voluminous instrument is given a couple of hearings in the city councils and after provoking some trifling argument, it is rushed to Richmond for ratification. The people know nothing about it, it was not even printed so that copies might be obtained by the citizens to read and digest. No opportunity for amendments or objections was afforded the public, and scarcely one m...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 14 April 1906

originality and talent and genius must go to the wall, and the reign of mediocrity must begin. Undoubtedly Norfolk is full of pretty girls. If they were all as good as they are pretty, things might be different. The commercial buildings are fairly alive with young and pretty maidens. Our young lawyers in particular seem to have a predilection for youth and beauty in their female help. Possibly these qualifications are a great assistance to the legal business. Oppressed with knotty problems, it is a relief to the eye and mind to turn the gaze upon some charming creature whose nimble fingers are playing wantonly over the celluloid alphabets. It arouses the fagged intellect and inspires to greater efforts. And in dictation of the confidential kind what inspiration comes from the sheen of golden hair hanging over dainty shoulders! And what is more restful than the faint odor of scented tresses spread in inviting abandonment beneath the manly chin? It is indeed a contemplation fit to dri...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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