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Elephind.com contains 360 items from Critic, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Critic — 14 July 1889

VOL. 2. NO 44. Mr. M. W. Norvell is in the city. Mr. E. A. Catlin's family is at Cobb's Islapd. Miss Carrie Talbott has returned from Lynchburg. Miss Kate Montague, of west Franklin, is at Cobb's Island. Mrs. Moses Thalhimer is on a visit to friends in Philadelphia. Misi Irene Bodeker. of south Third street, is at Cobb's Island. Miss Kate Wallace leaves for Bristol, Tennessee, next Thursday. Miss Emma Barksdale bas gone to Brown Hill, Halifax county. Mrs Jacob Reinhardt *nu children are summering near Gordonsville. Miss Ruby Bodeker, of Church Hill, is in Washington visiting friends. Miss Virgie C. Pleas«nts have gone to Mountain Lake Park, Maryland. Miss Julia Morton, of west Frfinklin, will leave Tuesday for Staten Island. Miss Carrie Shields is spending a delightful time at the Rockbridge Alum. Mr. J. B- Hankins, clerk at the Capitol, has returned from a visit to his home. Mrs. E. H Fisher, of north Twelfth street, is visiting relatives near Staunton. Mr. A. O. Bliss and son, Har...

Publication Title: Critic
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Critic — 14 July 1889

THE CRITIC. PUBLISHED SATURDAY IN RICHMOND, VA W. CABELL TRUEMAN, EDITOR AND OWNER OrFn.Ui NU 1217 EAST MAIN STREET EDtai<«> in Richmond, Virginia, econd-class matter. SUBSC3IPI ION. T«riMP Rv mail, one dollar a year, in advance; haob pnnioo by mail, 10 cents each—sold only to subscribers. The Cbitic has a widely-extended circulation among all those interested in social and literary subjects and matters of fashion as well as the history, genealogy and illustrative memorials of the past. Its advertising columns offer the best medium in the South for the sale of articles used in the household —clothing, groceries, furniture, books, fuel relics &c., &c.. and its rates are exceedingly low. We solicit unpublished genealogical material relating to Virginia families, their descendants, •nd connections. Such contributions, whether in the shape of extended genealogies, or notes to be used in the preparation, will be carefully arranged knd edited,...

Publication Title: Critic
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Critic — 14 July 1889

Colonial Land Patents. PATENT NO 66. < Phettiplace Clause, [a] ancient planter, 100 acres on the east side of Warwicksqueake river. Issued in 1628. note Phettiplace Clause settled in Virginia in or before 1619; was burgess for Mulberry Island October, 1629, and for "fiom Denbigh to-Water's Creek," 1632. PATENT NO. 67. John Ley don, [a] ancient planter, 100 acres bounded by Blunt Point Creek, and the lands of William Cooksey and Anthony Burrows. In lieu of a patent of 100 acres in the Island of Henrico and Coxendale (granted him in 1619; on account of the great danger in planting there. Issued in 1628. note. a. John Leydon (or Layton) born 1580; came to Virginia in 1607. His marriage in 1608 with Ann Burras (born 1694; came to Virginia in 1608;, maid of Mrs. Forrest, was the first solemni&eu in the colony. In 1624 they haa daughters : Virginia, Alice, Katherine and Maty, all born in Viiginia. The first named was probably the first white child born within the pr...

Publication Title: Critic
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Critic — 14 July 1889

CHINESE ACTORS. They Have Established a Regular Theatre in New York. MONGOLIAN IDEAS AND PLAYS. No Ij»dieg in Tights—No Ladle* at All. Boys and Me* Skilled in Women Characters —Nearly All Flays Historical—Marvelously Rich and Varied Costumes. For the first time in its history the theatre goers of New York city have an opportunity to see a dramatic entertainment in which t>lay, plot, language, costumes and players are all Chinese. An enterprising Mongolian manager, Li Tong Li, has taken to the Windsor theatre the "Swin Tien Lo," or "Soon Han Lok," which in our own vernacular is equivalent to the Sublime Dramatic company, and is there producing a repertoire of the more popular dramas of China. Everything about these strolling players is Oriental. When they reached New York, instead of engaging rooms at a hotel or boarding house, they leased an empty floor in a great warehouse and there live in what is very like the military fashion. Instead of rehearsing in the theatre, the...

Publication Title: Critic
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Critic — 28 July 1889

VOL. 2. NO 46. J I MISS CHAMBERLAIN. AN American girl who will soon wed a foreigner is the beautiful Miss Jennie Chamberlain who will be the wife of Captain Leland—a good-look-ing. well-bred Englishman. Miss Chamberlain was born in Cleveland, Ohio, some twenty two or three years ago. The descriptions of her in the papers lor years past have been dazzliugly flattering. The exquisite pink and while complexion, dreamv. liquid blue eyes, superb figure, and classic profile, form part of Miss Chamberlain's possessions, but her chief charm is said to be her pure and lovely character. Leona. Published by request. Leona, the hour draws nigh. The hour we've waited so long, For the angels to open a door through the sky, That my spirit may break from its prison and try Its voice in an infinite song. Just now, as the slumbers of night Came o'er me with peace-giving breath, The curtain half lifted, revealed to my sight Those windows which look on the kingdom of light That borders the river of dea...

Publication Title: Critic
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Critic — 28 July 1889

THE CRITIC. PUBLISHED SATURDAY IN RICHMOND, VA W. CABELL TRUEMAN. EDITOR AND OWNER OrFUJi No 1217 EAST MAIN STREET »'■ -.st-office in Richmond, Virginia, econd-class matter. SUBSCRIPTION. i>rr.ip Kv r>iail, one dollar a year, in advance; hnr>lr <»f>nie<s h v mail, 10 cents each —sold only to gnbscribers. The Ckitic has a wideiy-extended circulation among all those interested in social and literary subjects and matters of fashion as well as the history, genealogy and illustrative memorials of the past. Its advertising columns offer the best medium in the South for the sale of articles used in the household —clothing, groceries, furniture, books, fuel relics &c., &c.. and its rates are exceedingly low We solicit unpublished genealogical material relating to Virginia families, their descendants, and connections. Such contributions, whether in the shape of extended genealogies, or notes to be nsed ...

Publication Title: Critic
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Critic — 28 July 1889

Colonial Land Patents. A SERIES OF ABSTRACTS OF THE GRANTS TO SETTLERS. [The genealogical and land patent articles appear alternately."! PATENT NO 85. Richard Ball, [a] planter, 6 acres at Buck Roe, adjoining the land of "David Poole, Frenchman." Issued in 1627. NOTE. a. Henry Ball was burgess for Elizabeth vJity in 1646 PATENT NO 86 Nicholas Hoskins, [«] of Accomac, yeoman, 20 acres i" Accomac adjoining " the land of Thomas Powell and the land lately in the possession of Captain Wilcox [ft]. Issued in 1626. NCTES. a. Nicholas Hoskins was born 1589, and came to Virginia in 1616. His wife. Temperance, came to Virginia in 1621. In ' 1624 they had a daughter, Margaret, born in Virginia. Anthony Hoskins was burgess for Northampton, 1652. ft. Captain John Wilcox cam 2 to Virginia in 1620, and was a member of the House of Burgesses, 1623. There is on record in England the will of "Captain John Wilcooks, late of Plymouth (England), now of Accomac, intending to go on service against the Ind...

Publication Title: Critic
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Critic — 28 July 1889

' HOW MATILDA GOT LEFT. Long Jim an' I was standin' thar. All slick like an 1 jess so, When Tilda in her hunkieat hat, J Come up an' 'lowed she'd go With him as showed her far an' squar He loved her best—as beau To 'Squire Urchard's dance that night, Twelve mile across the snow. Now, both on us wur kinder sweet I On Tilda, that's a fact; But we was pards, an alius wurked Upon the self same tract; And me an' Jim, we 'greed as how Our eyes warn't better blacked, An' flghtin' fur a slick girl's hand ! Warn't like what it was cracked. An' so to fight fur her sweet smile Right thar we did object; Aii' Tilda she blew off alone, Her feelines suthin wrecked. Fur this the reader should give thanks—- • He will I do expect— For it's tougher far to read than write A poem in dialect! —Pittsburg Dispatch THE FATAL POTATO. "One of the queerest cases I ever had," said the old detective, "occurred something over twenty years ago. Then I still had much to learn in my business, and, fortunately for me...

Publication Title: Critic
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Critic — 4 August 1889

VOL. 2. NO 47. pl!lsg?s& EDGAR ALLAN POE. Edgar Poe was the son of some travelling actors ; was born January 19, 1809. it is said in Boston, though some claim Baltimore was his birth place. His parents died in Richmond a few years later and it is likely that the father was burned in the old Richmond theatre Erigar had a young and delicate sister who was adopted by Miss Jane McKenzie, a well known teacher of this city, and who soon died ; he —a beautiful and winning child—was taken under the wing of Mr. John Allan, a wealthy Scotch merchant of Richmond, who added his own as Poe's middle name, and had him placed in the University of Virginia; his conduct was so recklessjand self indulgent there that be was expelled ; subsequently he received similar treatment at West Point. Sonn he began writing poetry; his habits became utterly abandoned and during a visit to his foster father, who had a second wife and who lived on the west side of Fourteenth street opposite the lower en...

Publication Title: Critic
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Critic — 4 August 1889

THE CRITIC. PUBLISHED SATURDAY IN RICHMOND, VA W. CABELL TRUEMAN, EDITOR AND OWNER Or Fl«;i NO 1217 EAST MAIN STREET Enteix" at -ist-office in Richmond, Virginia, econd-class matter. SUBSCRIPI ION. Term." Rvmail, one dollar a year, in advance; hiu»lr pnnioa by mail, 10 cents each—sold only to subscribers. The Cbitic has a widely-extended circulation among afl those interested in social and literary subjects and matters of fashion as well as the history, genealogy and illustrative memorials of the past Its advertising columns offer the best medium in the South for the sale of articles used in the household—clothing, groceries, furniture, books, fuel relics &c., &c.. and its rates are exceedingly low. We solicit unpublished genealogical material relating to Virginia families, their descendants, •nd connections. Such contributions, whether in the shape of extended genealogies, or notes to be used in the preparation, will be carefully arranged •nd edited, and pri...

Publication Title: Critic
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Critic — 4 August 1889

The Whittle Family. Written for The Critic. Genealogical Letter 41 * This family is of original English descent, but was seated several hundred years at Thistleborough, in the North of Ireland, from whence two brothers, Conway and Fortescue, emigrated to Virginia about the beginning of this century. The former established himßelf as a merchant in Norfolk, and married Franoes Moseley, daughter of Munford. ana widow of John Boush, [al who died 1817, having with other issue, Conway, born August 21, 1800; appointed midshipman, United .Atates Navy, but resigned after derving several years; married Chloe, daughter or Chancellor Simut 1 Tyler, and nad issue: 1, Mary married Reverend J. J. Sams; 2, Grace Latimer married Major Horace Sams, Confederate States Army; 3, Chloe " married John Newport Green. Fortescue Whittle, younger brother of the first Conway, was an ardent Irish Libera], and took an active part in the troubles which brought Emmett and others to the scaffold. He was, however, f...

Publication Title: Critic
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Critic — 4 August 1889

SCHWATKA IN MEXICO. The Mineral Wealth of the Sierra Madras. An Interesting Description of the Richest Gold and Silver Region In the WorldMining Interests At and About Batopilas—History of the Queer Old TownMinor Matters. L Copyrighted, 1889 ] America's Expedition in the Field, 1 on the Western Slopes of the Sierra > Madres, May 29, 1889. ) In the great broken barrancas leading out to the westward from the heart of the central Sierra Madres I found myself in the richest mineral district of America and probably the richest in the whole world. The fact that this is not generally known, and, to tell the truth, but very little has •ver been published about so rich a district in the English language, and that little is so very old, would make it easy to write a half dozen interesting articles about the month's investigations I made, but for want of room I shall only devote the major part of this article to the subject. One of the leading late cyclopedias says of Mexican mines:...

Publication Title: Critic
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Critic — 11 August 1889

VOL. 2. NO 48. OCR DISTISenSHED FELLOW CITI- - Copyrighted 1839. CHAPTER IV. ENTERPRISE. A man relieved of a burden straightens himself and immediately forgets how he groaned under the load. Torn by force from the old surroundings which had seemed so securely fixed, Schney's pain would have been great but for the presence of awful fears. When these were relieved he found that he was not, after all, ruined, and was possibly benefitted. There was at least tirnt to look about, and a chance for new ventures with possibly greater success. The return of his wife and daughter Schney felt was a pre requisite to any further plans for life, and this decided him to please and astonish his wife oy icvealing to her a fact which he had sedulously kept from her knowledge. "Pauline," he said, "do you remember the house where the people lived named Braxton ? It is mine!" "Why, papa " exclaimed his wife, "you are now only dreaming. That fine yard, with trees and flowers, and such a house is worth a f...

Publication Title: Critic
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Critic — 11 August 1889

THE CRITIC. PUBLISHED SATURDAY IN RICHMOND, VA W. CABELL TRUEMAN, EDITOR AND OWNER Ojf NO 1217 EAST MAIN STREET Entered at the Post-office in Richmond, Virginia, Second-class matter. SUBSCRIPTION. Term." T4v mail, one dollar a year, in advance; hAplr hy mail, 10 cents each—sold only to subscribers. The Critic has a widely-extended circulation among all those interested in social and literary subjects and matters of fashion as well as the nistory, genealogy and illustrative memorials ol :he past. Its advertising columns offer the best medium in the South for the sale of articles used in the household—clothing, groceries, furaiture, books, fuel relics &c., &c.. and its rates ire exceedingly low. We solicit unpublished genealogical material relating to Virginia families, their descendants, and connections. Such contributions, whether in the shape of extended genealogies, or notes to be used in the preparation, will be carefully arranged *nd edited, and printed w...

Publication Title: Critic
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Critic — 11 August 1889

Colonial Land Patents. ,A SERIES OF ABSTRACTS OF THE GRANTS TO SETTLERS. [The genealogical and land patent articles appear alternately.] PATENT NO. 113. Thomas Harwood, of Skiffes Creek, 100 acres on Skiffes Creek, adjoining the land of "Mr. Avery." Issued in 1632. NOTE. a. Thomas Harwood came to Virginia as a member of the Council, 1620; burgess for Mulberry Island, 1629, 1630, 1631, 1633, 1642; for Warwick, 1644, 1645, 1648, -J649; speaker of the House of Burgesses; 1648 9; sent to England in 1634 by the burgess to justify to the English government their action in removing Governor Harvey, and on his arrival was arrested and for a time kept a close prisoner for his N share in the matter. He appears to have been for many years one of the leading men of the colony, and had numerous de scendants in Warwick, York, Charles City, King William, and other counties. Captain Thomas Harwood died in or before 1652, lenving, at least two sons : 1, Humphrey, of Warwick, mentioned in a patent of...

Publication Title: Critic
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Critic — 11 August 1889

" A SETTLER." Brother Jim Criticises Woman's Follies in Dross and Gets Worsted. HY in heaven's name does a woman squeeze up her waist until it looks like that?" indignantly asks Brother Jim, in - dicating one of our Chicago young ladies arrayed like a butterfly and shaped like a wasp, who has 1 just passed down the aisle and taken a sea ' In the front row of the dress circle. "What beauty does such a goose see in a compression that sends her shoulders up into the air and makes her neck, face and arms look like a boiled lobster, pops her eyes half out of her bead and gives her a general appearance of idiocy?" he continues, taking advantage of -the fact that the orchestra now gives him an opportunity to speak in his natural tones. "Hush! do be quiet," I say; "some one will hear you," but my words fall upon unheeding ears, and he rushes madly on, pouring a cataract of invective over the unconscious little damsel who sits fanning herself and chatting merrily with her companion with an a...

Publication Title: Critic
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Critic — 18 August 1889

VOL. 2. NO 49. HENRY W. GRADY. One of the leading men ot the South is Henry W. Grady, the editor of the Atlanta Constitution. Mr. Grady is a Georgian and education, but finished his studies at the University of Virginia. After several unsuccessful business ventures, Mr Gradv turned his ambition to ward journalism, becoming the leading writer on tlje Atlanta Herald, and afterwards correspondent of the New York Herald. His energetic nature soon became inspired with the idea of developing all his latent powers by writing and pub lishing a series of letters uuder the title, "Sheep, Gold and Oranges," which proved to be the means of re-opening industries to the southern classes, which had drooped into a semi comatose condition. In time Mr. Grady became one the editors and owntrs of the Constitution, which has become one of the most influential organs of the South. Mr. Grady contributed numerous articles on southern subjects.to Harper's and the Century Magazines, which have been widely re...

Publication Title: Critic
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Critic — 18 August 1889

THE CRITIC. PUBLISHED SATURDAY IN RICHMOND, VA W. CABELL TRUEMAN. EDITOR AND OWNER OrFlt.'Ji NO 1217 EAST MAIN STREET Entered at the Post-office in Riohmond, Virginia, Second-class matter. SUBSCXIPI ION. Tp.rm* Rv mail, one dollar a year, in advance; hAflr f>nni»a v>y mail, 10 cents each—sold only to subscribers. The Critic has a wide'.y-extended circulation among all those interested in social and literary subjects and matters of fashion as well fix the history, genealogy and illustrative memorials of the past. Its advertising columns offer the best medium in the South for the sale of articles used in the household—clothing, groceries, furniture, books, fuel relies &c., &e.. and its rates are exceedingly low We solicit unpublished genealogical material relating to Virginia families, their descendants, and connections. Such contributions, whether in the shape of extended genealogies, or notes to be used in the preparation, will be carefu...

Publication Title: Critic
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Critic — 18 August 1889

The Grymes Famiy. Written for The Critic. Genealogies'. Letter 42. Grvraes Part 1 It is possible that the Virginia family of Grymes is descended from an ancestor who settled in the colony at an earlier date than that generally assigned. Charles Grymes, clerk (clergyman) had large grants of land on both sides of the lower Rappahannock in the period 1650-1660, and in York county court in 1657 a judgment was awarded in favour of "Mr. Charles Grymes," administrator of Thomas Grymes, deceased. A daughter of Charles Grymes probably mairied Robert Taliaferro, the first of that family in Virginia, as in 1672 3 there was a grant on the south side of Rappahannock, adjoining the lands of "Henry Corbvn and Mr. Grimes," due the said Robert Taliaferro, Junior, as the grandson of Mr. Grimes. However, the first from whom descent is traced was John Grymes (said to have been a son of Lieutenant General Thomas Grymes, of Cromwell's army, who settled in Middlesex, at "Grymesty," on the Pisnketank, wher...

Publication Title: Critic
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Critic — 18 August 1889

HOMELY ENOUGH FOR TWO. "Oh, why did you many so homely a man?" The people all said to our Sue; "It's none of our business, but really, dear. He is homely enough for two." "I know it," she said, with a cute little smile, "You are right, I can plainly soe; He's homely enough for himself that is one, And he's homely enough for me." —Washington Critic. PERILS OF PETER DUFF. I did not hear him enter. Nervous as I was, I should have appreciated the foot fall of a cat. He did not burst upon me. He rose up as if he had control'of a theatrical trap worked through the carpeted floor. There was my writing table, littered with books. The limit of my horizon used to be a garden, seen through the window; now the figure of a great lank, ominously faced man blocked the light. How did he get there? He did not glare at me, but veiled his eyes, concentrating their fell powers under half closed lids. Clad in a seedy black coat, he stood motionless, like to a rusty feathered crow, and said, in a croak t...

Publication Title: Critic
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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