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Elephind.com contains 42,108 items from Lompoc Journal, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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i non uni [Newspaper Article] — Lompoc Journal — 2 December 1899

i non uni By ROBERT BARR. [Copyright, 1898, by the Author.] The proud and warlike Archbishop Baldwin of Treves was well mounted, and, although the road by the margin of the river was in places bad, the august horseman nevertheless made good progress along it, for he had a long distance to travel before the sun went down. The way had been rudely constructed by that great maker of roads, the army, and the troops who had built it did not know when they labored at it that they were preparing a path for their own retreat, should disaster overtake them. The grim and silent horseman had been the brains, where the troops were the limbs. This thoroughfare had been of his planning, and over it, back into Treves, had returned a victorious, not a defeated, army. The iron hand of the archbishop had come down on every truculent noble in the land, and every castle gate that bad not opened to him through fear had been battered in by force. Peace now spread her white wings over all the country and w...

Publication Title: Lompoc Journal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
All Kvenlnte 4*iiII. [Newspaper Article] — Lompoc Journal — 2 December 1899

All Kvenlnte 4*iiII. “I called »n Perkins Inst evening.” remarked Mr. Brown. -Did you have a pleasant time?” inquired Mrs. Brown. “Very. Perkins was boating his wife when I came in.” “WhatV” “I say Perkins was beating his wife, but of course he stopped when 1 came in.” “Well, 1 should hope so.” “I begged him to go right on, but he said some other time would do just as well.” “You begged him to go on.” “Why, yes, I didn't want to spoil the fun, you know.” “Oh, you brute!” “Eh?” “Do you mean to say you could have looked calmly on while he beat his wife?” “Certainly. Why not?” “I thought you had at least a spark of manhood left. I suppose you will be beating me next.” “Yes, 1 think I could if you would play cribbage with me.” “Play cribbage?” “Yes. That is what Perkins and his wife were doing.” “You horrid thing.”—San Francisco Examiner.

Publication Title: Lompoc Journal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
me Pronunciation Explained [Newspaper Article] — Lompoc Journal — 2 December 1899

me Pronunciation Explained “There Is a family in Virginia,” says Collier’s Weekly, “the name of which is spelled ‘Enroughty,’ but it is pronounced ‘Darby.’ This fact, familiar to many Americans, happened to be told by Miss Hayward at a dinner in Loudon at which Mr. Kipling was present, when lie broke in: ‘You have saved my reputation by telling that. You are the first man, woman or child who could back me up in it.’ “The explanation of the peculiarity is that the Derbys were an English family who settled in Virginia in the-colo-nial days. One of the sons, the traditional black sheep of the family, was left a share in his father's will on condition that lie changed his name. He changed his written name to Enroughty, but continued to call himself Derby. “On hearing this explanation Mr. Kipling said, ‘I think I will change my name to Smith.’ ‘You can spell it Smith if you like,’ was the reply, ‘but it will always be pronounced Kipling,’ a remark which caused him to look ‘ns unfeignedly...

Publication Title: Lompoc Journal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
She Silenced Greeley. [Newspaper Article] — Lompoc Journal — 2 December 1899

She Silenced Greeley. Horace Greeley once bad a discussion with an advocate of women’s suffrage shortly before the American civil war. He was using as his final argument the inability of women to fight. “What would you do, for instance,” he asked his friend, “in the event of war?” “Just what you would do, Mr. Greeley,” she replied promptly. “I should stay in an office and write articles urging other people to go and fight.”

Publication Title: Lompoc Journal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Measuring Time. [Newspaper Article] — Lompoc Journal — 2 December 1899

Measuring Time. Just when the day became divided Into hours is not known, nor is the process explained. The Greeks and Romans measured time by the water glass and the sun dials. The hourglass, filled with sand, was the outgrowth of these vessels, from which the water dripped through tiny openings. McSwaiters—Where is your mother-in-law now? McSwatters—We are living with her. McSwaiters— What! I thought you owned a house? McSwltters— I did till she came,— Syracuse Herald.

Publication Title: Lompoc Journal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
DIAMOND DOLLARS OF 1804. Only Poor of the Origin** Coinage of 10,570 In Existence. [Newspaper Article] — Lompoc Journal — 2 December 1899

DIAMOND DOLLARS OF 1804. Only Poor of the Origin** Coinage of 10,570 In Existence. “Every now and then one reads about the discovery of another of the famous ‘diamond dollars’ of 1804,” said a gentleman of this city who owns one of the finest private collections of coins and medals in the south. “The dollars of that date are popularly supposed to be worth from $1,500 to $2,000 apiece, and if a few originals could be produced I dare say they would bring that figure easily enough. But it happens, unluckily, that there are only four on earth, and they are locked up in the vaults of the treasury building at Washington and couldn’t be bought at any price. They are what are known as the ‘test pieces,’ which are always laid aside whenever a new coin is struck, and the rest of the issue Is at this moment quietly reposing under several miles of deep blue sea. Ihe true story is rather interesting. In 1804 the mint at Philadelphia is known to have turned out 19,570 silver dollars. That was the...

Publication Title: Lompoc Journal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
AN ENGLISH “TREAT.” The Difference Between the Rrltlnh and American Methods. [Newspaper Article] — Lompoc Journal — 2 December 1899

AN ENGLISH “TREAT.” The Difference Between the Rrltlnh and American Methods. I was constantly struck, says Colonel T. W. Hlggiuson in The Atlantic, with the genuine spirit of hospitality among Englishmen toward Americans,as such, even those with whose pursuits they might have almost nothing in common, and for whom they had not the slightest reason to put themselves out I liked this none the less for its having Its definite limitations as to pecuniary obligations, and the like, Including everything in the nature of “treating,” all this being in my opinion a weak point in our more gushing or more self conscious habit. I remember to have once been taken by a gentleman, on whom 1 had but the slightest claim, to the country bouse of another, on whom I had no claim whatever. The latter was not at all literary, and had not even the usual vague English Interest in American affairs. Yet he gave up his whole afternoon to drive me to Kenilworth, which he had seen a thousand times. But that for...

Publication Title: Lompoc Journal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Other* to Blame. [Newspaper Article] — Lompoc Journal — 2 December 1899

The Other* to Blame. “You can’t keep a secret, Marie.” “Yes, I can; but I always happen to tell things to other girls who can’t.” — Chicago Record. A little sugar taken with water, not too cold, in case food is not obtainable, will relieve any feeling of exhaustion and sharp hunger. The use of cocaine to produce local Insensibility is forbidden in Turkey on religious grounds.

Publication Title: Lompoc Journal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SHORT NEWS STORIES. Stephen Crane’e Revenue— A Healthy Prince—James Whitcomb Riley’s Joke. [Newspaper Article] — Lompoc Journal — 2 December 1899

SHORT NEWS STORIES. Stephen Crane’e Revenue— A Healthy Prince—James Whitcomb Riley’s Joke. When Stephen Crane was a student at Syracuse college he some way won the wrath of a certain professor who was instrumental in having him expelled from the institution. Thereafter Crane cherished a beautiful hatred for this professor. The Greek war broke out. Crane was sent to “cover it” tor a newspaper. One day he found himself with a companion between the two lines. He could go in neither direction. With his friend he lingered in the hills. They lay under a tree one night, and just as they were about to roll over to sleep the sound of breaking twigs fell upon their ears. Both men looked whence came the sound. Out into the moonlight stepped a man. He was Crane’s old professor. The correspondent called him. and he joined the two men. He had come to the country to study the archaeological remains and had lost his way in the hills. He had been wandering around for three days eating berries. Crane...

Publication Title: Lompoc Journal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A Healthy Prince. [Newspaper Article] — Lompoc Journal — 2 December 1899

A Healthy Prince. Many stories are current about the Prince of Wales’ recent visit to Marienbad. where he was most democratic. It is said that a Polish Jew, sitting on a park bench next to the prince, not knowing his Identity, began to question him about what he paid for his rooms, doctors, etc., ending with digging his royal highness in the ribs and telling him he looked too healthy to need the water cure. DIDN’T NEED WATER CURE.

Publication Title: Lompoc Journal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
James Whitcomb Hlley’x Joke. [Newspaper Article] — Lompoc Journal — 2 December 1899

James Whitcomb Hlley’x Joke. J. Whitcomb Riley did his llrst literary work in the early seventies, for the Indianapolis Journal, under an assumed name. The first pay he ever received for a poem was a suit of clothes from tlie late George Harding of the Indianapolis Herald. About 18iO Riley went east and was welcomed by Holmes, Whittier and Longfellow. The New England newspapers made much of his visit, and when he returned he was a hero. “I can remember,” said an old Journal man the other day, “when Riley, with his smooth, boyish face, slender figure, clad in sacerdotal garb, used to come to the office and sit on my desk and dash off nonsense verses In the same copperplate, microscopic handwriting that he uses today. Elijah Halford, now a paymaster, with the rank of major, in the United States army and President Harrison’s private secretary, was the editor, and it used to be Riley’s chief delight to submit some of hi's most meaningless jingles to Halford for the editorial page. The m...

Publication Title: Lompoc Journal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
What He Wanted to Be. [Newspaper Article] — Lompoc Journal — 2 December 1899

What He Wanted to Be. Lord Charles Beresford as a boy was the despair of both his parents and teachers. On his thirteenth birthday his father gave him his choice whether he would enter the army or the navy or take up orders. “Well,” he concluded, “what is it to be, my lad?” “The navy, my lord.” “And why the navy, boy?” “’Cause I’d like to be an admiral, like Nelson.” “Pshaw—like Nelson! Why Nelson?” “ ’Cause I want to.” “But, even if you were to join the lavy, why do you think you will ever become an admiral, Charlie?” “ ’Cause I mean to,” was the blunt reply. He had his wish and entered the navy.—Collier’s Weekly. •*

Publication Title: Lompoc Journal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Kitchener’* Compliment to the Queen. [Newspaper Article] — Lompoc Journal — 2 December 1899

Kitchener’* Compliment to the Queen. Lord Kitchener of Khartum is a straightforward soldier, but he does not scorn the art of turning a compliment gracefully. It has long been said of him that he Is proof against all feminine charms, and when he waited upon her majesty at Windsor the queen was curious enough to put a pointed question. “Is it true, my lord,” she asked, “that you have never yet cared for women?” “Yes, your majesty,” replied the sirdar, “quite true—with one exception.” “Ah!” said the queen, “and who is she?” The sirdar bowed. “Your majesty.” said he—Youth’s Companion.

Publication Title: Lompoc Journal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Manner* In Public. [Newspaper Article] — Lompoc Journal — 2 December 1899

Manner* In Public. The person who has been trained from childhood to consider the comfort and convenience of others at the expense of his own will instinctively take the least comfortable seat In a car and get on or off the car in a way which will others the least inconvenience. The person who has not been trained iu this way will make himself obnoxious and cause much inward swearing among his neighbors. Let the children be trained to be poHte—Washington Times.

Publication Title: Lompoc Journal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Lompoc Journal — 2 December 1899

NEW MORRIS HOUSE OPENED MARCH 5,1895. UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT. Rates $1.85 and $2 per Day. - 1 * Room for Commercial Me FREE *BUB TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS. W) Brennan & Callahan. - - - - Proprietors. It Stands to Reason That it pays to buy of ... . McPhail because he is selling Furniture of All Kinds At astonishingly Low Prices Have you seen his magnificent stock of WALL PAPER Which he is offering at from 5c to 15c a Roll. Floor Coverings Way Down - AT - MoPHAILH J. B. DEAN Leading Druggist. Prescriptions Accurately Compounded. A LA ■» ♦ ♦ RQ E STOCK OF" PURE DRUGS . . . . PATENT MEDICINES. The Acme Electric Belt For Sale. STATIONERY AND S LOMPOC. - CAL. Agricultural Implements, HAY, GRAIN and FEED, CQRN MEAL and GRAHAM FLOUR MADE to ORDER. JOHN SPANNE. MANHOOD RESTORED & “CUPIOENE” This great Vegetable Vi taUxer.theprescrlpif all nerCons'lpation.**l t stops aIT losses by day dr night. ’ Prevent* quickness of discharge, w hlch If not checked leads to Spermatorrhoe...

Publication Title: Lompoc Journal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Lompoc Journal — 30 November 1901

The Lompoc Journal. A Local Family Paper Devoted to Home Interests and Local Industries. VOL. 12. LOMPOC, SANTA BARBARA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1901. NO. 33.

Publication Title: Lompoc Journal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
F~F?GDIVL pOORHOUSE TO pALACE [Newspaper Article] — Lompoc Journal — 30 November 1901

F~F?GDIVL pOORHOUSE TO pALACE CHAPTER XVI. “Oh, mother, won’t yon take this pillow from my head and put another blanket on my feet, and fix the fire, and give me some water, or something? Oh, dear, dear!” groaned poor Rose Lincoln, as with aching head and lungs she did penance for her imprudence in crossing the wet, slippery street in thin slippers and silken hose. Mrs. Lincoln, who knew nothing of this exposure, loudly lamented the extreme delicacy of her daughter's constitution, imputing it wholly to Mount Holyoke discipline, and wishing, as she had often done before, that “she'd been wise and kept her at home.” Jenny would have wished so, too, if by this means Rose's illness could have been avoided, for it was not a very agreeable task to stay in that close sick-room, listening to the complaints of her fault-finding sister, who tossed and turned and fretted, from morning until night, sometimes wishing herself dead, and then crying because she “wanted something, and did not know w...

Publication Title: Lompoc Journal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HUNTING WITH THE CAMERA. A Delightful and Profitable Way of Stndyinjr Bird Life. [Newspaper Article] — Lompoc Journal — 30 November 1901

HUNTING WITH THE CAMERA. A Delightful and Profitable Way of Stndyinjr Bird Life. Of the many delightful birds I had the good fortune to know, the wormeating warbler family have afforded me the greatest pleasure; for they become absolutely fearless of the camera, and they place a degree of trust in one that was as unusual as it was delightful. Being anxious to secure photographs of the young. I paid frequent visits to the nest, and what a wonderfully concealed nest it was, tucked away in n small depression and hidden by the roots of an oak sapling. It would forever have remained undiscovered by me had I not, by lucky chance, observed one of the parent birds visiting it. Only at first did the owners object to my intruding, and by various methods did they try to coax me away from their homo. First one and then the other would feign broken wings, and half - rolling, half - scrambling, they would make their way down the steep hillside in the hope of luring me away. Then, finding that I w...

Publication Title: Lompoc Journal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
“Stracis ’ Bring High Prices. [Newspaper Article] — Lompoc Journal — 30 November 1901

“Stracis ’ Bring High Prices. A genuine Stradivarius violin is worth whatever the person owning it may ask. At $l,OOO It would not bo deemed extravagant.

Publication Title: Lompoc Journal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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