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Title: Dunmunkle Standard Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 8,667 items from Dunmunkle Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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How Horses and Sparrows Work Us Mischief. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 20 February 1914

How Horses and Sparrows Work Us Mischief. • ♦ Kecent scientific discoveries are gradually making us aware of the fact that the horse, long consider ed one of man's most useful friends, is in many ways one of the worst enemies. Lockjaw is only one of tho deadly perils for which, .the horse is dirtclly responsible. It is now known that the germ 'of;' lockjaw, or "tetanus," as science terms it, is a common inhabitant oi" the intestinal c;tiial of the equine beast. When, as often hup-' pens. gardens are fertilised .with', horse manure, their soil becomes rich in tetanus microbes. It -is; very dangerous for children Co run about barefooted in tho strcots, be cause. if they happou to cut their foot, lockjaw gorms tiro Jiablo to iii feet the wounds. It is estimated that 95 per cent, of all the. houseflies in cities are bred i(i stables whore horses aro kept—horse munure beiti# preferred by tho insects to all othor sub stances as incubating material for their oggs. IJenco it is o'.vjou.-? t...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Titles Nobody Claims. ROMANCES OF THE PEERAGE. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 20 February 1914

Titles Nobody Claims. 1 ROMANCES OF THE PEERAGE. The betrothal of the Duchess of Fife to her relative, Prince Ar- j thur of Connaught, is a reminder ; that the late duke's kinsman, Mr. ' Duff, who resides in Australia, at St. Kilda, Melbourne, has so far not troubled to establish his right to tlie Fife earldom in the Irish peerage. The honour is his if he cures to claim it, but. realising' that | there is no property attaching to , the title, Mr. Duff lias no desire to be 'Earl Fife without adequate , 'means to sustain the dignify. j Though people arc so eager tc | obtain handles to their names, iiu mense sums being contributed to ! i the party funds )>y ambitious indi- , viduals in the hope of getting a knighthood, baronetcy, or peerage, a good many titles are awaiting claimants. On the death of the. seventh Karl of Milltown in 1891, ; the honour became dormant, as no heir came forward, but one, it is alleged, to be found in the person of a guard on an Indian railway, who marrie...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Lord Roberts' 81st Birthday. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 20 February 1914

Lord Roberts' 81st Birthday. ■ t From for and wido congratula tions hava boon extended to Earl Roborts on hit eighty-first birthday anniversary, the Veteran lUeld-Mar shal having beon born on Septem ber 00, 1S32. Hia career is port of the history of tho country. The siego of Delhi, tho relief of Luck now, tho battlo of Cawnpore, anil tho pursuit and defeat of the CJwa lior contingent, tho engagement nt Khudaganj, in which ho won tho Victoria Cross—these figuro among his record of services in the dark days o^r tho Indian Mutiny. It Was tho Afghan War of 1878-81. that stamped Lord Roberts as a mili tary leader of the first rank. His famous telegram when lie set om on the march to Kandahar will be recalled to-day. "You need have no fears," he informed the Indian Government, "about my division. It can tnko cure of itself, and will reach Kandahar under a month." All the world knows how that pro mise was brilliantly fulfilled to the letter. At an age when most sol diers have rotired from ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SIX MILES UP! [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 20 February 1914

SIX MILES UP I f , (By GAHHET P. SERV1SS.) The greatest peril for those who ascend to great altitudes above the earth is not that of fulling, but that of being suffocated, like fish taken out of water. . It vus the climbers of high - mountains „ who first discovered tho ' fact that ft is often dilliculb for .men to breatho at a height of I from two and a half to three ( miles above sea level. But more recent study has shown! that the dilliculty arises mainly j frqin the comparative lack of oxy-1 gen in the upper nir, and that this may be overcome by means of appa ratus supplying extra oxygen to the lungs. The two principal constituents of the atmosphero are oxygen and ni trogen. Mixed, these are near the earth's surface, "in the proportion of about four volumes of nitrogen.! to one of oxygen, the air is re-1 spirable, and the inertness of the ! nitrogen does no harm. But if the : proportion of oxygen is reduced, the air becomes stifling. ! -Now, oxygen is heavier than ni-1 trpgen in...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WARRACKNABEAL RACES. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 20 February 1914

WARRACKMABEAL RAGES. The Warracknabeai races were held on Wednesday and Thursday, and were highly successful. There was a record attendance, good fields and excellem racing. Very few favorites got home, • hut no rank outsider scored. Book makers were plentiful, and there was a good amount of speculation. Mr. Brannigan, stipendiary sieward, was present, and everything was conducted in first-class order. Results :— First Day. Hurdle Race—Newton's Duke i, Armstrong's Neitierby 2. Neil Geddes, the favorite at odds on, came in an easy first, but weighed in 4lbs li.uht and was disqualified. 5 to 1 against Duke. Maiden Plate—M'Phee's Yen Error 1, Byron's Wieroona 2, Phillips and M'Kenzie's Brittanica 3. All three started at 2 to x. Cup—\V. Dean's Golden Princess (Turner) 1, D. M Rse's Yatla 2, J. Williams' Eucador 3 Florrie Park and Miss Merriang also started. The Ararat mare won comfortably by half a-length. She and Yatla started at 2 to 1. Trot—L. S. M'Rne's Prinz r, L. G. Glenister's La...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Clergyman Began It. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 20 February 1914

The Clergyman Began It. i . Tlii.' following story is <>[ a Yorkshire parish. A \o'inn" clergy :man was taking holiday iluty in a moorland district, wheiv the church goers went largely made up <■[ far mers and shepherds. Tho latter ut'i'i' in the habit <_>f bringing their dogs with t.hcui In church, and, li:.r their masters, they listened quiet Iv dering I In; s<ti;i(111. The new r[. n,';. 111:111, :ihis lir.st. service, started intoi.ing, which the people c<.>i\si<J• *ri■< 1 Komish, and, unused to s'ii<i( an iniKical ion, one of the dogs commenced to yowl. " Take that dog out !" enjoined the clergyman; but 110 one moved, and he proceeded with the service. The intoning- was renewed, and so also was the howl ing. "Tal e that dog' out !" com manded (he clergyman. "I told you before to huvo it removed." One of the shepherds rose from his seat and dragged the animal out side. Presently shutt...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A MOTHER'S DEVOTION. A REMARKABLE CASE. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 20 February 1914

A MOTHER'S DEVOTION. a remarkable case. Twenty-one years ago one of the sons of Mr. and Mrs. C. Peters, a well-known /arming family in the Warracknnbeal district, was stricken down with rheu matic fever, which left him completely paralysed. From thai time on he has not been able to move hand or foot, and had lain on his bed or where he might be carried day and night. His mother has nursed him continually, and has read to him all the events of interest in the daily papers and the Bible through and through. As the ye^rs went on his limbs have grown to gether and his sight has completely gone, but body and digestive organs are abnormally strong and healthy, and hfs weight has increased until' he now weighs over 12 stone. All his strength appears'to be centered in the faculty of the mind, and his memory and rapid brainwork are marvellous. ' Although quite blind he can, through his mother's; constant reading, to him, discuss and argue intelligently on almost any sub ject or event of inte...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HORSHAM RACE CLUB. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 20 February 1914

HORSHAM RAGE CLUB. The following weights have been de clared by Mr. W. Robinson for the races to take place next Wednesday and Thursday :— Hurdle Race.—Neil Geddes ii.6, Cranley Chase 10.12, Ballapur 10.7, Merrinita 10 2, Duke 9.T2, Ivy May 9.10, Netherby 9.4, Kroth 9 o. Ladies'Bracelet.--Valwick 12 2, Boy Casey 11.9, M'Dougall io.to, Doctor Jack 10 9, Fiery Bob 10 9. Davey 10.7, Wimmera • King 10.0, Bobby Dear 10,0. Horsham Cup.—Stick Up rr.r2, Demolition 10.7, Yatla 9 o, Ruapare 8.io, Spearfish 8.o, Hopevale 8.0, Florrie Park. 7.13, Miss Meriang 7.10, Kidman 7.6, Ecuador 7 4, British Lass 6.12, Byock 6.10, Bobby Dear 6.7. Pony .Race.—Mela 9.12, Junar 9.0, Brilliant 8.13, Our Three 8. to, Sim merette8 6, Aurate 8.5, Wee AggieS.o, Voyarrie 8.0, Lady Mary 8 o, Little Vera 7.13, Little Skinner 7.12, Le Grande 7.12, Tdeal 7.12, The Pin 7.9, Assembler 7.6, Lady Sim 7.4, Minimay 7 4, Peerless 7.2, Carchap 7.0, Thunder King 7.0, Renewal 6. to. Flying Handicap—-Moon Moth 9 4, Ruapare 9.2, ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DISTRICT DIVORCE CASE. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 20 February 1914

DISTRICT DIVORGE CASE. Kangroo-hunting and charcoal-burn= ing were the occupations that took Ernest Ethelbert Jones, of M^Kenzie's Creek, Horsham, to the Roeburne dis- trict of West Australia. This, as he explained in the Divorce Court on Tuesday to Sir John Madden, was the course of the trouble which has led to his application to the Court. While in West Australia his wife, Frances Jones, made the acquaintance of Hiram Naismith, a constable of police, with whom, the husband stated, she sub- sequently confessed to having miscon ducted herself. A decree nisi was granted, and the petitioner was given the custody of the two eldest children, seven years and four years respectively. The parties were married on 2nd May, 1906, at Mount Arapiles. There are four chil- ren. Ernest Jones gave evidence that he lived happily with his wife till 1908, when they went to West Australia   His wife and he at first camped, but afterwards he took a house for her in the town of Roehurne. He ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Woman's "No" all Powerful. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 27 February 1914

Woman's "No" ail Power ful. —.—f A manuscript dealing with Gudu la. Jiothschiiti, the mother of the great banking family, and wife of Maier Anisehel Rothschild, the foun der of tlie financial dynasty, has -Just been unearthed - in a family that at her time lived in the Ghetto at Frankfort, Germany. One. of the most interesting, entries is this : "liC&rning that another war was in the air, I went to Mother Gudula, saying thai; I didn't liavo the. money to buy 6fT my son, that ho u'ould probably be taken for the military and might-be killed. Mother Gudula said she would sec about that, and told mo to , coine back the next day, for in the evening her sons -would arrive from Lou don, Naples, Paris, and Vienna to talk business with h civ for all theso gre.lt bankers wont to seek the acl vic.c of . Mother Giisula in business matters of. international magni tude. • When I went to sec Mother Gudula again she was all stnilcs. ' 15e of good cheer,' she said, 'there will' be 110 war. I...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
An Ingenious Defence. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 27 February 1914

. An Ingenious Defence. At Munchen-Gliulbacli, an import ant West-German manufacturing town, a short time ago, a defend ant in the police-court was ques tioned why he had not answered a summons on an earlier date, and, without * further persuasion, lie re plied that lie had been unable to read the signature appended to the document; nml 'therefore considered himself justified in doubting" its authenticity. . The' defendant's solicitor enlarged on the pointy of-the illegibility of the signature, " and surprised the court intensely by. pleading that Uv»- uiooftlVln_ ciaimt.urG rendered tlie document totally void "of"legal value. This; original standpointhe man aged to support with .such a mass of ~ legal precedent that the court decided that a. summpns signed ■.with an illegible signature could "have no value in law.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Was Nursed by Napoleon. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 27 February 1914

Was Nursed by Napoleon. | ♦ Thi' centenary of the battle of Waterloo >vill fall due within an other two years, and, naturally, old people who can remember that epoch making ovent are very few. I'ro bably the. most interesting link with those old dnys is'the centenarian at Kc.iilly, France, , who . claims that when ho was a. „:chiM he was often held in the ar.ma of the great Na poleon himself. TTG -was born iiv 1807, four years' before the Em peror's- son, the King of Rome With whom ho played in the park^ ai'^ St. (JIoimI. He still possesses one of the dolls which contributed to the amusement of "I/Aiglon," as Napoleon's ill-fated heirhas been historically nick-named. The pa triarch is a bachelor, and without relatives. For fifty years milk 1ms been his only food. ITc keeps a r'oof/ above his head and clothes himself decently on thirty cents a day allowed him by the Assistance Publique. I

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Animals as Weather Prophets. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 27 February 1914

Animals as Weather Prophets. Shepherds and others who spend .much time in the open air say that we 11105'- always know when it will ' rain by watching the wsi.vs of ani-J mals. Thus, if donkeys bray more often thun usual, or if they hang their ears downwards and forwards and rub against walls, rain wilt come on. When cats sneeze, and when they also give up chasing their tails, look out for rain. It. will be rainy if the dogs oat grass or be drowsy and stupid. Kxpect rain when sheep turn their backs to the wind and when peacocks squawk n great deal, and when pigs carry straw to their styles or are. very restless and given tognuch grunting, and when the molo throws up plenty of soil. Haiti will come when horses stretch out thsir nccks and snifT the ah'. 1 Jn districts where bh'ts are found it will rain if they fly into the houses' and cry much. And should oxen kick their forefeet or turn up their nostrils and snifi„the air, or lie on their right, sides, we may count j confidently upon...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Earth as Food. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 27 February 1914

^ Earth as Food. ' Among many strange foodr. which ' the inhabitants of this world j>:ir tako of, and consider delicacies, perhaps the .strangest of all is earth. Yet there arc tribes, the Lust inns of Siam, who actually eat and enjoy earth. 7t has never been discovered where these peculiar peo ple contracted this habit, though it is generally beliovod that it probably came about in the time | of a famine when there was no- ! thing else (o be had. However, the 1 habit has now got such a hold 1 upon them that, old ;wid young, ! rich and poor, alike indulge freely ! in its consumption. I II is preferred u lion it lias been-' acquired from the vicinity of waters ' so tlnil it carries with it a. taste of ; fish. It is made into n pasty sub-, stance and smothered into the' ground in a hol_,fir«. '11 can be obtained at markets and at stores, anil is served at dinners and at big functions of any description. . Jn some [tarts of the Congo earth is sold in the shape of apples and • orange...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Koopo Or[?]tuff Fresh. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 27 February 1914

Koopo..Or.iiCii3Lu.(t Prcah. - One pf iW clijicf causes/.of failure in the backyard' .".pouUry.. run is ...on insuflicicii't supply .. offresh, green stuff. ' Even . whoa "green meat is available in plenty, the/-usual prac tice is. to throw ' it into the,, runs,, where it is trampled up.on and very soon becomes uimt for food. , "I have tried 'inany ways .of keep ing the 'greenstuff' given, to my birds clean and /fresh,'", writes, a corres pondent, "but the following method is the only one 'that has answered, my purpose - '; - "I got a pieco of wide-meshed netting citui mndo it into a b«£, fastening a wire ring at the top iyj shown in the sketch.- Then I nVado handles of string, anil filing', it up within easy reach ..of the fowls' beaks, but out of the way of their feet.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
(All Rights Reserved.) THE Secret Island. A Story of a Strange and Exciting Adventure. CHAPTER I. AN OCEAN MYSTERY. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 27 February 1914

(All Rights Reserved.) TR Story of a Strange and Exciting Adventure. i By W. Murray Graydon, Author of "Matthew Quin," "The Curse of the Cardews," etc., etc. CHAPTER I. AN OCEAN MYSTERY. Seven bells had just struck, signi fying that an hour yet remained of the.morning: watch, when Dick Valen tino turned out. of his cabin and mounted to the deck of the Boadiceu. With conscious pride his eyes swept fore and aft, resting in turn on the polished brass railings, the ample deckhouse in the contrc, and the fun nel with its tip of crimson. For this finely-built schooner-rigged yacht of about five hundred tons had been his own property less than six months, and the novelty of possession was not even beginning to wear off. From the deck he climbed to the bridge, ■where a rugged-featured man was standing "alertly. "Good morning, Captain Brand," he said, cordially. "What sort of weather are wo going to have ?" "Fair and calm, sir, I think," the skipper replied ; "there's a bit of a breeze comin...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Carrying a 20-ton Engine on a Cable. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 27 February 1914

Carrying: a 20-ton Engine on a Cable. i. The strength of p;ihlo is jjraphi- j cally ilhist rnlocl in a photograph from Mexico, vv'horc rngim.'erinp plant hn.s had to he transported l>y caljlcway over llie Uio CJrantlo River. : ■ The scries of cnblewnys erected at Elephant Butte, New Mexico, have been employed to weighty ad van tage in transporting many thou sands of tons of material apd ma chinery. Recently it was found no cess'ary' to transfer a 20-ton engine across the canyon. Fearing the .weight of the engine .might, too .'"severely test- the strength of a.single cable, the engine was syfuug across on two cables and was safely landed-; at jts destination^ on the other side. The length of the cableways from one tower.-to the other is 1,4 oO feet and the height of span above river bed is about 280 feet.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHYPTER III. TWO MEETINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 27 February 1914

' CHYPTER III: TWQ MEETINGS. Well-groomed, frock-coated, with a sprig of violets in his button-hole, Dick left his chambers in the Albany about noon, and turned towards Pic cadilly Circus. He (lid not" look like a man who -was on the verge of go ing to the dogs or the Jews—who had less than five pounds in cash to his name. It was the day following the stormy interview at Heron, Court, and for many hours,- over "many pipes he had calmly reviewed the situation". Now lie had doggedly braced himself for the future, and to him that ; meant no reconsideration. It is usual ly the man of breeding, the upper > class plunger and spendthrift, who meets ill-fortu.ne like a stoic ; and. ; Dick'-Valentine was of that sort. | * Ho-know that the reckless pnst was done and ovor'with ; that he must" drop out of club-land, vanish from his particular circles of Upper Bohe ,mia, as so many liad done before him. In a new country, under a false I name, perhaps, lie must seek and woo I the. fickle godde...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Asleep in the Dustbin. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 27 February 1914

Asleep in the Dustbin. ? The dustbins of Rouen, which the authorities of that mwn boast are of the most modern type in France, have been nearly responsible for the ' death of a mnn, When the dust- | bins Ipve been collected early in the morning they are hooked on to an endless chain which; carried tlieni up to the top of a furnace and there automatically empties them. When tlua was being' done on Friday, a workman noticed what, looked like a good pair of trousers in one of the dustbins, as it was about to be emptied into the furnace. Anxious to Siivo the garment for his own use, he pulled the lever which stops the ' movement of the chain. Looking closer, he found a man asleep in the dustbin. The man had been put in tlie dustbin to sleep, as a joke, by several companions with whom lie had spent the evening, and who j were intoxicated. |

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LIVE STOCK in DRY FARMING. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 27 February 1914

LIVE STOCK in DRY FARMING. To get at the importance of live stock in (lry farming, Prof. Shcpperd sent a list of questions to the Direc tors of the Experimental Stations in the North Western, b"cates. of Amer ica. Among, these questions was the following-: Do you consider live, stock husbandry essential to success ful dry land -farming in your State ? Why? • * The directors of the Experiment Stations are probably in ^closer touch .with the best systems of farm man agement than any other set of. men. Their answers are as follows : Thatcher, Washington.—Yesr-where rain fall is enough to grow forage. Webster, Kansas.—Absolutely. | Burnett, Nebraska. — By men. of small means designed to build homes; not for traction, and. farming work, j McKillican, Manitoba.—Yes ; to be permanent it is essentials I : Mackay, Saskatchewan.—Yes ; to be] permanent. I '-Forbes, Arizona.—Yes. ; Hobbs, Nevada.—Yes. j Humbert, New Mexico.—Yes ; be- J cause dry land farms produce coarse feeds best, and these c...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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