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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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AUTOMOBILE NOVELTIES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

AUTOMOBILE NOVELTIES. MOTOR FUNERAL CAR. MOTOR FIRE ENGINE.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LITTLE BOY BLUE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

    LITTLE BOY BLUE.   The little toy dog is covered with dust, But sturdy and stanch he stands; And the little toy soldier is red with rust, And his musket moulds in his hands. Time was when the little toy dog was new, And the soldier was passing fair, And that was the time when our Little Boy Blue Kissed them and put them there.   "Now, don't you go till I come," he said,   "And don't you make any noise!"   So toddling off to his trundle-bed   He dreamt of the pretty toys.   And as he was dreaming an angel song   Awakened our Little Boy Blue—   Oh, the years are many, the years are long,   But the little toy friends are true.   Aye, faithful to Little Boy Blue they stand,   Each in the same old place,   Awaiting the touch of a little hand,   The smile of a little face.   And t...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BIRTHDAY HONORS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

BIRTHDAY HONORS.   Complaint is made (says London "Truth") that in the Birthday Honors the claims of literature are ignored. I trust that they ever will be. A shower of baronetcies, knighthoods, stars, and ribbons rained down on popular authors, as though they were Mayors or contractors, would by no means tend to the dignity of literature. The aim of a literary man should be to rise to being spoken of without even the prefix of Mr. Who—to cite modern instances—speaks of Mr. Thackeray, Mr. Dickens, Mr. Darwin, Mr. Froude, or Mr. Ruskin? How would their fame have been   increased if their breasts had been plastered over when alive with stars, and hung round with ribbons? "I can understand," adds the writer, "a person who has inherited a great historical title through a long line of ancestors deriving some pleasure in its possession. But for a new man to accept an hereditary title, and to be proud of it, is foolish."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BRITISH POLICE COURT JUSTICE. The way they dispense justice in some of the British police courts is past understanding. Here are a few typical cases in parallel columns, from London "Truth," to show exactly what is meant:— [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

BRITISH POLICE COURT JUSTICE. The way they dispense justice in some of the British police courts is past understanding. Here are a few typical cases in parallel columns, from London "Truth," to show exactly what is meant:— Aberdeen Police Court. Before Bailie Mait- land. Peter Fraser, convicted of assaulting his wife by striking her about the face to the effu- sion of blood. Fined 15s, or five days. Epping Petty Sessions. Before Messrs. J. Todhunter, W. Palchett, W. Smith, C. Hurford, and W. C. Waller. George Wheeler, laborer, charged with assaulting James Judd, an old man of over 70. Complainant remonstrated with de- fendant for picking up some change belonging to him, in a public-house. The defendant replied by knocking the old man down, inflicting a severe wound on his head and rendering him insensible. He had been laid up since the date of the assault, and now appeared with his head bandaged. The Bench said it was a cowardly assault. Fined 5s and 11s 6d costs. Brierley Hill Poli...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ANOTHER PENTRIDGE PLOT. PRISONERS PLAN TO ESCAPE. BY AN INGENIOUS METHOD. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

ANOTHER PENTRIDGE PLOT.   PRISONERS PLAN TO ESCAPE. BY AN INGENIOUS METHOD. A sensational attempt was made on Saturday by two prisoners to break away from Pentridge (Vic). The plot was carefully prepared (says "The Age"), and to a certain stage carried out, and but for a mere accidental discovery the Sparkes and O'Connor episode would in all proba- bility have been successfully repeated. The two men concerned in the attempt were Richard Buck- ley and Alex. Ward, better known as Ray- bould. Raybould had practically no time to do as his discharge was due in three or four weeks, and he took part in the enterprise evidently only to get Buckley out of prison along with himself. Buckley, who is doing a 22 years' sentence for burglary, is a desperate character. Raybould was working in the woollen factory, and, having such a short time to serve, had the privilege of moving about more freely than most of the other prisoners; while Buckley was working in the boot factory, and sho...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHERE MICROBES ARE OUTLAWED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

WHERE MICROBES ARE OUTLAWED.       The following drastic regulations for the con-   duct of barbers' shops have recently been adopted   by the Board of Health of San Francisco, U.S.A.   Mugs and shaving brushes shall be sterilised by   immersion in boiling water after every separate   use thereof. Razors shall be wiped with alcohol   before and after being used. Hair brushes known     as "sanitary brushes" must be used after first   being sterilised. Razor stops must be kept clean,     and never wiped off with the hand, or blown upon     with the breath. A separate clean towel shall   be used for each person. Barbers shall keep their   finger nails cut and clean. Alum or other   material used to stop the flow of blood shall be &nbsp...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CURIOUS BETTING CASE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

CURIOUS BETTING CASE. Two omnibus conductors were summoned at North London recently, for gambling in an omni- bus at Holloway. One of the men was ill in a hospital, and unable to appear, but the other— who gave the name of Kitchen—appeared and pleaded not guilty.—Constable 178 Y said that he saw the defendants and other conductors in a 'bus playing at cards. He saw money pass be- ween the defendants. In reply to the magistrate,   the constable said that the 'bus was third on the   stand, and the driver was not in his seat.   There were no passengers in it. Mr. Baggallay   said that gambling with cards was not in itself an   offence; it became one, however, when the game   was played in a public place or a place to which   the public had access. In his opinion no offence   had been proved in this case, as the omnibus   was not opened to the public at the time. It &...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PROTECTING CLOTHES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

PROTECTING CLOTHES. Clothes put away for the winter should be   protected by being sprinkled with naphthalene,   packed completely in brown paper, and then   wrapped in newspaper. It is advisable to   unpack and shake them well every two months   or so.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE KOZOS OF JAPAN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

THE KOZOS OF JAPAN.   In Europe apprenticeship in the proper sense     of the term is practically a thing of the past;   but in Japan, where it was probably in vogue   long before its institution in the West, it is still   in force to a very great extent.       A "kozo"—literally "a little priest"—is the   name by which apprentices are known in the   land of the chrysanthemum; and though the   youngsters usually have to work hard, and have long hours, they are generally fairly happy, for "nagging" is practically unknown.     "Kozos" are usually the sons of poor or mid- dle-class parents, who cannot afford to support or educate them at home. It is a good system,   because it enables them to thoroughly master   some useful trade, which is the best possible   way of pr...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TRICKS OF VENTRILOQUISM. STAGE DODGES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

TRICKS OF VENTRILOQUISM. STAGE DODGES. We can no longer be sure that the ventrilo- quial effects of the stage are honestly obtained, inasmuch as contrivances have been patented recently for producing them artificially.   In the mouth of a doll, for example, is con- cealed the receiver of a telephone, with a wire communicating with the mysterious region known as "behind the scenes." When the man- nikin is desired to talk, a hidden confederate furnishes the utterance, the effect being highly satisfactory to the deluded audience, which sup- poses that the performer behind the footlights is doing it all. Of late ventriloquists have tried to vary their performances by introducing, in addition to the old-fashioned dolls, stuffed animals, such as dogs, cats, and even horses, which appear to join in the conversation. This likewise is some- times managed by the telephonic method, the receiver being placed in the mouth of the figure. In this way even a pig may acquire articulate ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Extraordinary Golfing Performances. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

Extraordinary Golfing Performances. Perhaps the strangest golfing feat on record in the world is that depicted in sketch No. 1. On a Scottish links a player lately made a drive, and, owing to a miscalculation, the ball struck a boulder, and bounded on to the roof of a cottage situated on the links, finally lodging behind the chimney. "The player, being of the pertinacious sort, climbed on to the roof, and, sitting astride it, took careful aim, driving the ball from its hiding place, and thereby finishing a long hole in six strokes. The other day a sparrow happened to be in full flight across a golf course in the Midlands (Eng.) just as a player had sent his ball on a long drive. The bird and the ball came in contact in mid-career, and it is difficult to determine which was the harder hit, since both fell to the ground together. This is shown in sketch No. 2. Sketch No. 3 depicts a remarkable drive. A modest-looking Scotsman—for some Scotsmen can look modest even when they are playin...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MISPLACED CONFIDENCE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

MISPLACED CONFIDENCE. Visitor (at school treat): "Here is sixpence for you, little boy; I saw you give the whole of your apple to that sickly-looklng little girl over there.     Now, tell me, what prompted the noble action?"   Little Boy: " 'Cause I see a lot o' maggits a   crawlin' in an' aht that 'ere apple, and it give me     the fair creeps."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PING PONG IN THE KITCHEN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

PING PONG IN THE KITCHEN. —LONDON "PUNCH."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MACHINE-MADE MEN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

MACHINE-MADE MEN.   Everyone who thinks at all must have now and   then reflected how modern conditions of life tend to whittle away all individuality and impart a monotonous sameness to human kind. Our working classes, for instance, are in a sense machine-made, says "Country Life." They are sent to schools that are like factories, put through certain processes called passing the standards, and the pedagogue's ambition is to get them all to the same dead level. It is in no wise his interest to find out peculiarities or de- velop special talent. He counts it a success to have them all as much alike as bricks turned out of a kiln or screw nails from a factory. After leaving school the tendency of modem conditions is to crucify individuality. Go to the boot factories of Northampton, and it will be seen how to each individual one tiny monotonous task is set. For a lifetime one is condemned to make uppers—probably only a part   of the uppers—and fro...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SIBERIAN SULPHUR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

SIBERIAN SULPHUR.   The sulphur deposits discovered in Siberia, 100 miles from Kwiva, are estimated to cover 15,000   acres, and to contain 9,000,000 tons.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MARTYRED MISSIONARIES. RECOGNISING THEIR HEROISM. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

MARTYRED MISSIONARIES.   RECOGNISING THEIR HEROISM.     A meeting was held one evening last week at   the Independent Church, Collins-street, Mel-   bourne, to inaugurate a fund designed to com-   memorate the work in New Guinea performed by   the late Revs. James Chalmers and Oliver Tom-   kins, who were killed by the cannibal natives   at the mouth of the Aird River in April last.   The fund is to be devoted to providing a vessel   for the Fly River mission, and to promote the   evangelisation of the Aird River district. The   chair was taken by the moderator of the Presby-   terian Church of Australia, the Rev. Dr. Meikle-   john.   An apology for non-attendance was read from   Lord Hopetoun, the letter concluding thus:—   "I need hardly assure you t...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
COSTLIER THAN DIAMONDS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

COSTLIER THAN DIAMONDS. Diamonds are so generally quoted as emblems of wealth that it may surprise many people to learn that rubies are far more rare and costly. "A perfect ruby, if it is of a fine quality, will fetch several times the price of a diamond of the same weight," observed a dealer in precious stones. "One reason for the extreme costliness of fine rubies is the fact that when it reaches a certain size the average ruby is almost always full of flaws. "The most beautiful as well as valuable rubies are the Oriental variety. They are of a deep blood color, and full of fire, sending out rays of such intense brilliance that the ancients believed that they were actually luminous, and would light up a dark room. "The largest ruby in Europe is owned by the Czar, and was brought from China many years ago. But the most beautiful is owned in France. Of this stone it is said that, owing to its curious shape, it could not at first be cut without in- jury; but an ingenious diamond-cutte...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
INTERESTING TO PHILATELISTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

INTERESTING TO PHILATELISTS. There are some interesting statistics in the   third edition of the Postage-Stamp Catalogue   of Messrs. Whitfield King and Co., Ipswich. The   total number of all known varieties of postage   stamps issued by all the Governments of the   world up to the present time is 16,081. Of this   number, 141 have been issued in Great Britain,   and 4342 in the various British colonies and   protectorates, leaving 11,739 for the rest of the   world. Dividing the totals amongst the Con-   tinents, Europe issued 3823, Asia 2966, Africa   2775, America, (including the West Indies) 5268,   and Oceania. 1249 different varieties.   A comparison of these figures with those pub- lished in April, 1900, will show that 1455 new varieties of stamps have been issued throughout the world in the space of 18 month...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HEROIC RESCUE AT SEA. GRAPHIC STORY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

HEROIC RESCUE AT SEA. GRAPHIC STORY. A great number of ships of varied nationalities arrived in Shields Harbor on November 14th., many of which were seen to have suffered severe- ly in the great gale. The Intrepid, a collier steamer, well known in that port, had a most in- teresting story to tell of trial and stress, and   brought with her the master and fourteen of the crew of the German steamer Agnes, who were rescued in a most heroic manner. Captain Rosaltri, the German captain, inter- viewed by a press correspondent, said he and his companions owed their lives entirely to the bravery of Captain Dyer and the gallant crew     of the Intrepid. The Agnes was caught in Tues- day's gale some thirty miles east by north of the Tyne, and they soon had their hands well occupied. The vessel was struck by a succession of tremendous seas during that and the following day, and the boats one by one were washed away, the skylight was knocked in, the cabins...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHERE LIFE IS HELD CHEAP. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

WHERE LIFE IS HELD CHEAP.     There are great prisons around Irkutsk (says the "Anglo-Russian"). To these for generations men have been sent from Russia to expiate mur- der and unmentionable horrors. At the end of   their imprisonment they have been released. But the Russian authorities have not taken them back to Russia. They left them free to do as they liked—preferring they should stay in Siberia. They made for the big towns, chiefly Irkutsk, be- cause it is the gold centre. Accordingly a great part of the population consists of such men and the children of such men. There is, on an average,   one murder a week in the town. There are drunk- en quarrels, and then a hit over the head with a spade. Life is held cheap, and murders are com- mitted in order to steal a few shillings. Robberies with violence are common. Burglary is prevalent. Yet there are hardly any police in the town. Everybody is supposed to look out for himself. It ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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